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Full text of "Clarion Call, September 9, 1993 – May 5, 1994"

LIBRARY 

CLARION UNIVERSITY OF PA 
CLARION. PA 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1993/94 



AASUjuestions^omn^^ 



Accounting semin ar to be held 



8 



10 



ActivityJeejTiayberaisecl 



Activity fee raised $5.00 



Activi ty fee: students reject hike 



Advi^o^c^ncil^Ya^^ 



AID Alliance recieves major grant 



^^'5?Lh?L^?^^L?0^^?fe[toyL'?^^ 



AIDS: students careless about prevention 



ALF: leafs huskies mushing in defeat 40-18 



IL ^ti^jJgggl^j'jJgg^lggniPQ^Q for Miss teen 



12 



13 



14 



15 



16 



ALLIES: fight for homosexual rights 



Alumni Associationjonors^past faculty members 



Arr\r\\A Dnx!^. l-»_ :_i-^ '• i T—- •' 



Arn old, David: leaves jnterjmdean position 



17 



18 



19 



20 



21 



22 



23 



Autumn Leaf Fest jyah^ele brating 40 years 



A utumn Leaf Festival: homecomming queen 



Baschnagel, Norbert assumes VP of PSAHPERD 



BasebalMeariTsplitsw^^ 



Baseball: Adams, Billy 



Baseball: boys of summer set to take the field 



Baseball: team blows away Slippery Rock 



24 



25 



26 



27 



28 



29 



Baseball: team splits with lock haven 



Bas eball: team wins one over Edinb oro 
Basketball team wins one drop s two 



B asketball: Can Kwame play i nthe NBA 



Basketball^^oaches^a^^ 



30 



31 



32 



33 



34 



ggg'^g^^MlLggg'iyyglBgl spli^ road games 
Basket ball: eagles crush UPJ improve to 5-2 



Basket ball: eagles invite expunged national pow ers" 



Bas ketball: eagles lar Tdbignamgrecruits 



Bas ketball: lady e aglesdoseouU uccessful se ason 
Baske tball: lady eagle sonjiightto playoffs 



35 



36 



^^^'^^^^^Ll^dy^aglesjv^^ 



M??k?tbalUetVfil[W^^ cheer them on 



37 



38 



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41 



Basketball: men beat crimson eagles 



?5?'^?tbalhJIie[L^'^^ but lose to lUP 



Basketball: mens team splits two games 



5^^§iiLno!^amsabou^^ 



42 



43 



44 



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46 



47 



48 



^??'<?t^?!ll^'!^2nTenaH^^ 



B 



Februrary 17, 1994 



March 17, 1994 



Basketball^won^^ 



??5!^_?L!!]i_^?Ilds^*ij;ockscl^ 
BlOSclub saves environment at Mill Creek 



Blooddri ye: clarion wins cha llenge 
lioo^^rlvercupjTas^^ 



Board of Govenors 



Book Center: running in red 



March 17, 1994 



April 14, 1994 



March 24, 1994 



March 24, 1994 



November 4, 1993 



December 9, 1993 



February 24, 1994 



October 14, 1993 



September 30, 1993 



March 24, 1994 



April 21, 1994 



September 30, 1993 



April 14, f994 



September 30, 1993 



October 7, 1993 



February 3, 1994 



April 14, 1994 



September 23, 1993 
March 24, 1994 



April 28, 1994 



Mays, 1994 



April 21, 1994 



Februrary 10, 1994 



February 3, 1 994 
November 18, 1993 



February 3, 1994 



December 9, 1993 



December 9, 1993 



September 9, 1993 



April 14, 1994 



Februrary 10, 1994 



February 24, 1994 



Februrary 10, 1994 



February 3, 1994 



February 24, 1994 



Februrary 17, 1994 



Februrary 17, 1994 



November 11, 1993 



November 18, 1993 



March 17, 1994 



February 3, 1994 



December 9, 1993 



October 21, 1993 



October 14, 1993 



April 28, 1994 
October 28, 1993 



_C_ 
5 



14 



7 



11 



8 



19 



11 



15 



12 



8 



11 

8 

24 
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24 
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19 



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18 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1993/94 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1993/94 





A 


B 


C 


49 


Brown, Tim: records take back seat 


October 21, 1993 


18 


50 
51 


Bus - to mall now provided for students 


Februarys, 1994 


14 


Cable TV: service agreement reached 


October 14, 1993 


5 


52 


Campus Ministry: travels helps the poor 


April 14, 1994 


13 


53 


Career in your chosen field? Maybe and maybe not 


September 30, 1993 


6 


54 


Carlson Library: old hours to be reinstituted 


September 9, 1993 


1 


55 


Carlson Library: three new security officers hired for library 


September 23, 1993 


6 


56 


Cheated on exams and will do it again Clarion Students 


November 18, 1993 


6 


57 


Chinese acrobats to appear and amaze 


February 24, 1994 


11 


58 


Clarion County has its homeless 


October 28, 1993 


7 


59 


Clarion Express Store: work experience benefits CUP students 


September 16, 1993 


8 


60 


Clarion graudates release first recorded album 


December 9, 1993 


12 


61 


Clarks: activities day is full of events, exhibits and concerts 


September 16, 1993 


11 


62 


Class cancellations: once agin frigid winter weather 


Februarys, 1994 


1 


63 


College Papers: anti-abortion groups target 


October 21, 1993 


1 


64 


Comic: Carrot Top celebrity to appear and intrigue 


November 11, 1993 


11 


65 


Courses: new minors to be offered in music and geronotology 


November 18, 1993 


5 


66 


Crime: group focuses on 


October 28, 1993 


6 


67 


Crime: chair set afire on steps of President house 


November 4, 1993 


1 


68 


Crime: clarion athelete faces two charges 


April 21, 1994 


5 


69 


Crime: clarion borough police seek public assistance in assault case 


September 9, 1993 


8 


70 


Crime: false fire alarms plague dorms 


November 4, 1993 


7 


71 


Crime: Indecent assault in residence hall under investigation 


November 4, 1993 


1 


72 


Crime: plea bargains entered in borough burglary cases 


April 21, 1994 


5 


73 


Crime: recent incidents do not show an upward trend in crime 


September 23, 1993 


1 


74 


Crime: resolution to assault outside Campbell reached 


November 4, 1993 


1 


75 


Crime: sexual assault suspect bound over for trial 


Februarys, 1994 


5 


76 


Crime: student faces sexual assault charges 


Februrary 10, 1994 


6 


77 


Crime: students report another morning incident 


September 16, 1993 


1 


78 


Crime: three former CUP students bound over for trial 


Februarys, 1994 


8 


79 


Crime: three freshmen arrested on burglary charges 


December 9, 1993 


5 


80 


Crime: three students face theft and conspiracy charges from store 


March 17, 1994 


7 


81 


Crime: three students suspects in burglaries 


November 11, 1993 


1 


82 


Crime: two theft reported in Clarion 


September SO, 1993 


1 


83 


Crime; sentence handed down in sexual assault case 


April 14, 1994 


5 


84 


Crime; students charged in drug bust 


March 17, 1994 


10 


85 


Cross Country squad making great strides 


September 23, 1993 


24 


86 


Cross Country Team preparing for PSACs 


October 2 1,1993 


16 


87 


Cross Country: Griffo medals 


September 30, 1993 


20 


88 


Cross Country: teams struggle at PSACS 


November 4, 1993 


16 


89 


CSA constitution is ratified 


November 11, 1993 


5 


90 


Cultural Night: spend an evening going around the world 


November 11, 1993 


12 


91 


CUP students voice opinions on Somalia 


October 14, 1993 


6 


92 


Dance Concert: dancers to perform a step in time 


December 9, 1993 


19 


93 


Daniel Pruehs theatre award 


April 21, 1994 


15 


94 


Dean, Howard proves nice guys do not always finish last 


April 28, 1994 


13 


95 


DeLuca, Richard: new faculty 


October 7, 1993 


14 


96 


Disabilities handbook to be distributed on campus 


September 16, 1993 


8 



97 



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102 



5r!!2k!'T9gamesjT^^ than you think 



Earth day jam 



ElieWieseLPrize: students win national ethics essay contest 



^IlI^r^iP^triciaT^ro^^ 



E mergency Phone: in stallation to^efinisheid^Ma^ 



103 



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105 



106 



107 



108 



109 



110 



Ethics essay contest announced 



Faculty contract: APSCUF 



Feigel. Eric: hi^TTorjasT ture healing^p QweT ~ 
f^TSy^niMaymard?^^ 



Financial Aid: new forms announced 



griPjgyentjon^arTT paign kicks^fTthJs^veeira t^UP' 



Fjscu s^ Brian & Matt: ea^ lejrvthejDotlight 



Football: Clarion comeback falls short 35-23 



111 



112 



113 



114 



115 



116 



Football: clarion hoping to regroup 



Fo otball: clarion stripp edon9 92 PSAC ti tle 
Football: Clarion. I UPTernatcFon Saturday 



Foot ball: Cramer fiel d goal sinks Shipp 34-32 



^^5*^5!'i^??!?i^?9iildefens^^ Edinboro 



Football: eagles host shippensburg on Sat 



117 



118 



119 



120 



121 



122 



Football: eagles let one slip away 19-17 



Fo otball: eagles look for first conference win on Saturdav 



Football: eagles lose on paper cover Rock 29-25 



Football: eagles meet up with lUP once again 



Football: eagles pick lock haven apart 37-26 



Football: edinboro crushes eagles 28-0 



123 



124 



125 



126 



127 



129 



Football: fourth quarter rally fell Titans 23-20 



Football: lUP scores early often 44-7 



Footb all: only list that couj TtsjTeal[males team 



f22?bal!ifSACWes[Ch^^ 



Football: Vulcans overcome weather Clarion 26-14 



Fore man, Julia: former C UPjpublicjafety^^ 



^28 FoundersHall^^^ 



130 



131 



132 



133 



134 



135 



136 



137 



Founders Hall: renovations to start 



Fratornit\//Ci-iri-ii-i*«»». u : ~~: : 



^'^^^^iiiiM^^r^iites^^ 



B 



October 14, 1993 



April 21, 1994 



May 5, 1994 



February 24, 1994 



Februrary 10, 1994 



October 14, 1993 



April 14, 1994 



May 5, 1994 



November 4, 1993 



October 28, 1993 



September 16, 1993 



April 28, 1994 



September 23, 1993 



October 7, 1993 



December 9, 1993 



November 11. 1993 



October 28, 1993 



September 30, 1993 



October 21, 1993 



September 16. 1993 



October 14. 1993 



November 11, 1993 



November 11, 1993 



October 21, 1993 



October 7, 1993 



September 30, 1993 



November 18, 1993 



Februrary 10, 1994 



September 9, 1993 



November 4, 1993 



Februarys, 1994 



September 16, 1993 



April 28, 1994 



Fratornih/- /«min/«:i ...:-_ ±-. — — 



Fraternity: council wins prestig ious award 



fratemity^Delta^^ 



f[???n}ityLPE2!?55^^ 



138 



139 



140 



141 



142 



143 



144 



Fra ternity: Sigma P hjjpsjIorT^yict ed from house 
Generaleducatior^^ 



^■^^^L^^SI^D^!^^ 



Golf: Allegheny Invitational 



December 9. 1993 



March 17. 1994 



February 3, 1994 



April 14, 1994 



September 23, 1993 



Mays, 1994 



Mays, 1994 



April 21, 1994 



Golf: Clarion finishes thi rdatjyiercvhurst 



Golf ^agle take first plac e^twestmirister 

Golfj jolfers place 1 g th^ 

Golf: placed fifth at conference tourney 



Golf: start well 



April 14, 1994 



Mays, 1994 



Septem ber 30, 1993 



April 21, 1994 



November 4, 1993 



April 28, 1994 



April 14, 1994 



14 
1 



12 



6 

21 



19 
27 



23 



_11 
22 

17 



19 

19 
21 



15 



25 
19 
17 
21 

15 



10 



13 



11 



12 



6 



21 



21 



25 

ii. 

19 
21 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1993/94 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1993/94 





A 


B 


C 


145 


Golf: win at Edinboro 


October 14, 1993 


20 


146 


Graduates successful 


October 28, 1993 


5 


147 


Greek Week: with spring comes more friendly competition 


March 24. 1994 


13 


148 


Greek: traffic campus with rush hours 


February 3, 1994 


15 


149 


Greeks: will self police alcohol policy 


September 16, 1993 


5 


150 


Greja, Ed: professor meet Mandela 


November 11, 1993 


7 


151 


Group fights campus prejudice 


March 24. 1994 


1 


152 


Habitat for Humanity aids homless victims 


March 24, 1994 


13 


153 


Hall of Fame: CUP to induct 


April 21, 1994 


22 


154 


Herman's store: a pack of gum and a piece of history 


October?, 1993 


19 


155 


HIV/AIDS Clarion students tell what they know 


November 11, 1993 


6 


156 


HIV/AIDS service available locally 


September 9, 1993 


7 


157 


Hoover, Brian: named to student seat on Board of Trustees 


September 23, 1993 


8 


158 


Hoover, Brian: says involvment on campus is key 


March 17, 1994 


15 


159 


Hufnagel, Jeanne: clarion artist displays work 


September 23, 1993 


13 


160 


IFC elects new executive board 


Februrary 17, 1994 


14 


161 


Instructional appropriations request 


October 28, 1993 


1 


162 


Interfraternity council plans ahead for winter 


April 28, 1994 


14 


163 


International students get firsthand view of Clarion lifestyle 


September 23, 1993 


11 


164 


Jablonski, Joyce: new faculty 


October?. 1993 


14 


165 


Jewart, M and Donahue, A: stive to maek a difference for CU students 


September 16, 1993 


14 


166 


Johnson, Lisa: jazz band to present totally jazzalicious 


April 21, 1994 


17 


167 


Jones, Janet writes biography about MS 


March 17, 1994 


14 


168 


Kelly and Condo lead the way for new look eagles 


September 9. 1993 


21 


169 


King and Campbell promote positive environment 


October 28. 1993 


10 


170 


King, Karl sets example for everyone 


February 24. 1994 


12 


171 


Klicker, Ralph: recall your past life experience 


March 24, 1994 


15 


172 


Krauss, Iseli elected to chair national committee 


December 9. 1993 


8 


173 


Krauss, Iseli: studies memory skills in older adults 


September 23, 1993 


7 


174 


Learn how to reduce student drop outs 


April 28. 1994 


12 


175 


Leas, Don: receives honor 


March 17, 1994 


25 


176 


Lee, Li Young: poet to read at Clarion 


April 14. 1994 


13 


177 


Legal Education Seminar 


October 21. 1993 


1 


178 


Link, Angela: student senator 


October?, 1993 


16 


179 


Literacy council searches for student volunteers to assist specialized progr 


April 28, 1994 


6 


180 


Loan default rate threatens colleges 


September 9, 1993 


6 


181 


Luke, Malen: new coach to head eagle football team 


February 24, 1994 


21 


182 


Madrigal Dinner: celebrate the holidays old english styel 


December 9, 1993 


11 


183 


McAleer Colleen: senate is authority on education policy 


April 21, 1994 


7 


184 


McDonald, Sean chosen to attend multicultural seminar 


April 28. 1994 


13 


185 


McGreevy, Patrick: publishes book aboutr Niagrar 


April 21, 1994 


15 


186 


Midsemester break: students favor break over ALF week 


October?, 1993 


7 


187 


Migyanka, Amy: eagle in the spotlight 


Februrary 10, 1994 


20 


188 


Mill Creek coalition receives state award 


April 28, 1994 


8 


189 


Mitchells Coffee Cafe opens doors downtown 


May 5, 1994 


11 


19C 


Mong, Melisssa: compete for Miss PA crown 


Mays, 1994 


11 


191 


Morton, Kwame breaks scoring record 


Februarys. 1994 


23 


192 


Morton, Kwame named PSAC all time leading scorer 


April 28, 1994 


19 



193 



194 



Morton, Kwa me receive honors 



195 



196 



197 



198 



199 



200 



201 



iy!2[!2['LKy^fa^erp^^ 



M?yiiR?v!ew^fir^ 



Muchia do about matchmaking Shap kespeare way 



K^i loir^* Dim A^>%^— _i. i_ t^ 1 ~^ ; '~. — ^ — 



^y^y^iciDuo^oricertari^^ 



202 



MH^i^L^cultyrecital^^ 

Music: marching band performs in Pittsburgh Pj rade 



203 



204 



205 



206 



207 



Musicj^ resents first harp concert 



Musicjj tudents participa te ¥intercollegial ebandfestivar 
Nightshift, acoustic trio working ^^ 



NortonJBoiTnie_ Silvertongue faculty membe rdies 



Organ donation campaign: Clarion part of 



208 



209 



Organ donation the gift of a lifetime 



Parker, Kris, raps leading activist to deliver lectu re 



210 



211 



212 



213 



214 



215 



216 



Parking: committee reviews suggestions 



Parking: student woes continue 



Peskin, Carole: VP post candidate is interviewed 



POSE programenable rural sj udentsjorea^hgTj^^ 



Postlewait, John: jj rofessor P amazes with hypnotic feats 



President and student trade places 



PROUD campus organization 



217 



218 



219 



220 



221 



222 



223 



224 



PSEA named outstanding chapter 



P^jMJgjgfej^yLJLJggj all parking tickets 



Public Safety: move sparks student controvers y 
Rape Crisis Center: take back the night 



Reinhard. D: now serving on the top NCAA cou ncil 



Rejnhard, D: welcome new year and new challenges 






Ren ovation: Admisstionj jndRjIbicSafetynffif^^ 



225 



226 



227 



228 



229 



230 



231 



232 



Rickard, John: selected for Humanities award 



Rightner, Ron chosen to coach team 



Room and Board prices to increase next year 






Sabbatical leave come under fire 



Sabbatical leave grievance filed 
Sabbatical leave grievance settled 
ggnMriggjjg^LMedje^ art displayed" 



233 



234 



235 



236 



237 
238 



239 



Sanford Gallery: mixed mediasculpture exhibit 






Sanfrod Gallery: Mary Collins on display 



Schattauei\J_esjie_^^ — 



Ml!!!i^^?!?n?l^?n^P^!^fo^ crown 

l^hoiarship^^^^^ 



^ ^ — ■ - ~..-^.,gjw W illi I l|./U«^ 

240|See you at the pole: Kolri^m^dTil^ti^r^^ 



B 



October 28, 1993 



Februarys. 1994 



Februrary 10. 1994 



Februarys, 1994 



November 18, 1993 



November 18. 1993 



October?. 1993 



November 4. 1993 



March 17. 1994 



April 28, 1994 



March 17, 1994 



December 9. 1993 



Februrary 10. 1994 



Februrary 17. 1994 



Februrary 17, 1994 



Februrary 10. 1994 



November 4. 1993 



September 23. 1993 



February 24. 1994 



Februrary 17. 1994 



November 18, 1993 



October 28, 1993 



Februrary 17, 1994 



April 28, 1994 



October?. 1993 



Februarys. 1994 



April 28, 1994 



September 16, 1993 



S eptember 9. 199 3 
Februrary 10 , 1994 
November 18. 1993 
April 28, 1994 



Februrary 17. 1994 



March 17, 1994 



December 9, 1993 



February 24, 1994 



November 11, 1993 



March 17, 1994 



October?. 1993 



March 24, 1994 



Februrary 10, 1994 



September 23, 1993 



April 14, 1994 



September 30, 1993 



April 14, 1994 



Mays, 1994 



I October 14, 1993 



September 23, 1993 



16 



25 



15 
18 



10 



10 



18 



12 



13 



8 



12 



11 



8 



11 



11 



12 



14 
21 



18 



16 
12 



15 
14 
12 



21 



11 



12 



Clarion Call 



Sept-May 1993/94 





A 


B 


C 


241 


Sexual Assault : now is the time to become aware of the danger 


September 16. 1993 


12 


242 


Sexual Assault : wha to do if it happens 


September 30, 1993 


5 


243 


Sexual assault forum demands an end to our rape fostering society 


Februrary 17, 1994 


1 


244 


Sexual Crimes: what are the legal definitions 


September 30, 1993 


5 


245 


Shropshire, John: elected to two positions 


April 14, 1994 


6 


246 


Skovera, Dave: eagle in the spotlight 


March 24. 1994 


20 


247 


Sobolewski, Gene: steps down after 1 1 years 


November 18, 1993 


1 


248 


Softball team keeps improving 


April 21, 1994 


26 


249 


Softball: team finishes season 


Mays, 1994 


21 


250 


Softball: team gets first win 


April 14, 1994 


20 


251 


Softball: team has tough string of games 


April 28, 1994 


20 


252 


Softball: team looking for improvement 


March 24. 1994 


20 


253 


Sorority: Phi Sigma Sigma recieves national awards 


September 23. 1993 


12 


254 


Spangler, Bill: comic book writers to appear in Clarion 


September 30, 1993 


12 


255 
256 


Stanboro, J.J. in the spotlight 


Februrary 17. 1994 


21 


Steam line project 4.2 million reach construction phase 


April 28, 1994 


7 


257 


Steel Bandits: truly qunique diverse talent 


March 17. 1994 


13 


258 


Step program: preschool programs provide positive development 


April 21. 1994 


14 


259 


Stinging Rain: its time to meet the greeks 


September 16. 1993 


11 


260 
261 


Stoner, Dan: eagle in the spotlight 


March 17. 1994 


24 


Strawbridge, Kim eagle in the spotlight 


February 24, 1994 


22 


262 


Stress on the campus can lead to clinical depression 


December 9, 1993 


6 


263 


Student Authors: English Dept honors 


September 23, 1993 


15 


264 


Student loans: default rate below average 


December 9, 1993 


8 


265 


Student Senate election rules clarified 


November 11, 1993 


5 


266 


Student Senate opens the year 


September 16, 1993 


7 


267 


Student Senate: considers adoption of constitution 


October 28, 1993 


1 


268 


Student Senate: in need of representatives to serve on equality 


February 3, 1994 


7 


269 


Student Senate: new elected 


November 18, 1993 


1 


270 


Student Senate: new elected 


Mays. 1994 


1 


271 


Student Senate: new student officers elected 


December 9, 1993 


7 


272 


Student Senate: petition questioned 


April 28. 1994 


5 


273 


Student Senate: Schaub and Thompson 


September 23. 1993 


15 


274 


Study Abroad: students have chance in Malta 


September 23, 1993 


11 


275 


Swimming team pulls in three honors 


April 14, 1994 


21 


276 


Swimming: Clarion men prepare for 1993-94 campaign 


November 11, 1993 


22 


277 


Swimming: Clarion women seeking 19th straight title 


November 11, 1993 


20 


278 


Swimming: men lose but both swim teams look impressive 


February 3, 1994 


26 


279 


Swimming: swimmers and divers fare well at nationals 


March 17, 1994 


24 


280 


Swimming: team delve into season remain unbeaten 


December 9, 1993 


28 


281 


Swimming: women win 19th straight PSAC crown 


February 24, 1994 


22 


282 


Talent search program to receive federal funds 


April 28, 1994 


6 


283 


Tate, Davis: to replace Watkins in office of social equity 


December 9, 1993 


8 


284 


Taxi Service: interraternity council closes for reorganization 


Februrary 17, 1994 


5 


285 


Tennis: excellence is synonymous with Clarion 


September 9, 1993 


21 


286 


Tennis: clarion drops EUP.IUP 


October 7, 1993 


26 


287 


Tennis: eagles drpo 1-5 


September 23, 1993 


20 


288 


Tennis: golden eagles struggles at conference championship 


October 21. 1993 


16 



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Sept-May 1993/94 





A 


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337 


Wright, David: requests probe of state AG 


October?, 1993 


5 


338 


Wurm, Michael clarion baits 


Decembers. 1993 


25 


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February 3, 1994 


6 



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Volume 74, Issue 1 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 9, 1993 

Old library hours to be reinstituted 

Widespread student demand has been acknowledged 



News 

Council of Trustees 

Hew Council of Trustees! 
»amed pg.7| 

Features 

Feldman's private battle 

Movie star Corey FelUmanl 
talks about his fight agaiiist| 
aibstance abuse pg> H 



Sports 



CUP home opener 

piarion football teatnl 
peadying for home opener] 
gainst West Chester. . .pg. 19 



1 Clarion's 

iVeather Outlook 

thursday: Partly sunny, 
high SO 



p'iday: 

II 

liatttrday: 

iiinday: 



Partly cloudy, 
chance of rain, 
high 77 
F^urtly cloudy, 
high 70 
Sunny, high 70 



McHiday: Partly cloudy, 
high 75 

lluesday: Psfftly sunny, 
high 75 

liiedBesday: Pautly cloudy, 
high 76 



Index 



Ccanmentary pg. 2 

ews pg.5 

iV Guide pg.lO] 

paftires. Pg- Ji 

IntertainmeBt Pg- 16| 

Sports Pg.l9 

Classifieds Pg-23 



by Chad Briggs 
News writer 



Duiie to the dismay expressed by 
Clarion University students, 
Carlson Library study hours will 
be returned to normal in the near 
future. The decision was made 
late Tuesday night by President 
Diane Reinhard, university 
librarians and Provost John 
Kuhn after hearing complaints 
earlier in the evening, 
concerning the reduction of 
hours, from student leaders 
gathered at an unofficial meeting 
hosted by Student Senate. 

Jason Renda, a snident senator, 
told the Call Wednesday 
afternoon, "I'm pleased to see 
Uiat the adminisu^tion has seen a 
problem with the library hours 
and has changed it back to the 
original hours this quick." 

The outcry over Carlson 
Library's hours began last week 
when returning students 
discovered the operating 
schedule had been cut by 15 
hours per week. 

The proposal to reduce the 
hours came from the library staff 
at the end of last school year and 
was approved by Provost Kuhn 
over the sununer. 

In a memo to the Call, Deon 
Knickerbocker, chair of library 
faculty, cites that one of the 
reasons for the proposed cut in 
hours was the decrease in the 
number of people using the 
library after 9 p.m. 

On the average, she said, 45 to 
50 persons were counted exiting 
the library during late night 
hours last year. She added, 
however, that most of those 
people were either staff members 
or people looking for friends. 
Therefore, the library staff were 
often left "house sitting" an 
empty facility. 

She also said that the 
university did try to stretch hours 
despite staff shortages last term 
which, however, resulted in 
frequent acts of vandalism such 
as the loss of lilnrary materials. 




Chad Briggs/Clarion Call 
Senior Tammie Snyder spends her off hours studying in Carlson Library. Plans to scale 
bacl( library hours have recently been reconsidered due to heavy student input. 



Financial reasons also played a 
large part in the proposal and 
final decision, stated 
Knickerbocker in the memo. "In 
times of budgetary exigencies 



and deficient staffing, it simply 
is not economical to spend 
money monitoring a contingency 
study hall. It seems far more 
responsible to concentrate 



revenues to ensure that services 
and resources are available when 
needed during the day and early 
evening hours." 

(Cont. on pg. 4) 



Students slapped with tuition hike... again 



by Alan Vaughn 
Managing Editor 



Again this year, students in the 
State System of Higher 
Education had to dig a little 
deeper into their pockets to 
attend classes this fall. 

Graduate and undergraduate 
tuition for Pennsylvania 
residents rose $125 this year to 
$2,954. Non-resident under- 
graduate tuition jumped $1,230 
(20.09%) to $7,352 per year, 
while out of state graduate 
tuition rose $1,000 (23.83%) to a 



total of $5,196 per year. 

The 4.4 percent raise for 
Pennsylvania residents was just 
low enough to squeak under the 
4.5% limit on in-state tuition 
hikes in order to release another 
$13.99 million dollars into 
SSHE, through the tuition 
challenge program, on top of the 
$357.9 million aheady allocated. 
The money will be divided 
between the 14 SSHE 
institutions using the same 
formula used to divide up the 
base allocation. Variables 
include institution enrollment. 



historic cost of operation and 
other factors. 

The raise in out-of-state tuition 
is part of a phase-in plan that 
will eventually have out of state 
students pay the entirety of their 
academic costs, according to 
Scott Shewell, press secretary fOT 
SSHE. 

"Charges for non-resident 
tuition reflect more of the actual 
instructional and academic 
support costs for undergraduate 
and graduate students," said 

(Cont. on pg. 4) 



Celebrating over 70 years as a student nezuspaper 



Page 2 - The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 




The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chief 

Alan Vaughn 

Managing Editor 

Rodney Sherman 

News Editor 

Amy Gerkin 

Features Editor 

Ben Vessa 

Sports Editor 

Ray Henderson 

Photography Editor 

Samantha White 

Ad Design 

Chris Clouse 

Advertising Manager 

Troy Meeker 

Business Manager 

Bridget Josefczyk 

Circulation Editor 

Hans Dovenspike 

Copy/Design Editor 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the schcxil 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 12:00 p.m. on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
hcxly. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
arc due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 
advfilising revenue. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 2380 

Advertisinj; Kates 

Display Ads: I'cr Column 

"lnch...$5.50 

Classiried Ads...$I.(M» for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $.50 

SuKscription.s 

Semester...$7.0<) 

Aca<lemic Year...$10.00 

The Clarion 

Call is 

printed on 

recycled 

newsprint 



w 




The way I see it 



Editor-in-Chief 



We begin 
again 



Yet another new semester 
breaks in upon our summer lives 
interrupting so many wonderful 
moments of recreation. 

Now it's time for a little 
creation; work, writing, study; 
research. 

I certainly hope this is a good 
year for all concerned. There are 
cautious notes of optimism being 
sounded. Perhaps the university 
will be in a better financial 
situation; perhaps last year was 
our time of maximum constraint; 
perhaps we can get back to 
university life as we used to live 
it: simple restfaint. 

One clear and strong ray of 
light is the reaffirmation of 
accreditation given CUP by 
Middle States. This success 
completes a ten year cycle for 
the university and signifies that 
the university is, indeed, doing 
its job and in several cited areas 
is doing it admirably. It's almost 
non-news now that the site visit 
is over and the report is in, but 
the work consumed thousands of 
hours of effort, involved many, 
many, members of the total 
university community and the 
outcome was never guaranteed. 
Middle States. Accreditation is a 
seal of approval not a rubber 
stamp. 

The easing of the budget crisis 
and the success signaled by the 
Middle States reaccreditalion 
clears the way for more attention 
to our central tasks: teaching, 
learning -- somewhat refreshing, 
eh? 

Now, a few words about Hide 
Park -- the column has run 
uninterrupted since its inception 
on October 24, 1984. As 
promised there have been many 
speakers and many points of 
view. Occasionally there has 
been rebuiial, but mostly it has 
been a place where one can 
speak and be heard. Forum or 




A. Barlow 

safety valve, Hide Park has 
afforded the opportunity for all 
members of this university 
community to exercise their right 
of Free Speech. I, as 'self- 
appointed Groundskeeper' have 
been satisfied that the Park has 
served this vital purpose, and I 
have been particularly pleased 
that the student editors have seen 
fit to continue this column. 

So why does this column seem 
so eulogistic? Well, I'm setting it 
fully free. When I can sustain the 
claim that the Column has run 
unbroken, lo, these nine years; I 
should also note some instances 

(Cont. on page 4) 



Greetings and salutations! 
Yes, I came back for one final 
year at the Call (I couldn't pass 
up the late evenings -- or very 
early mornings four days a 
week-- whichever way you look 
at it). 

I would like to extend a warm 
welcome to all new students 
especially freshmen. As I 
mentioned in last year's welcome 
back editorial, the weather here 
is as unpredictable as the next 
LCB raid; so, take an umbrella 
when the sun shines and snow 
boots when it calls for rain. 

But, I digress. This year, by all 
indications, promises to be a 
good one for the Call. Many of 
our assistant editors last year are 
now fulfilling the roles of their 
peers. 

Along with new people, we 
have some new features like 
syndicated columnist Dave Barry 
and the cartoon. In the 
Bleachers. In addition, we have 
brought back some of last year's 
favorites such as News of the 
Weird and the TV Guide. 

And, staff members will once 
again contribute to this column. 

If there is anything that you 
would like changed or added in 
the Call, please let us know. 
Your input is invaluable to us. 

Invaluable to the rest of the 
campus as well. Due lo student 



protest, the former library hours 
will be reinstated sometime in 
the near future. It's good to know 
that administration considers 
student input important enough 
to actually change something. 
Could this be the beginning of a 
beautiful friendship between 
students and administration? 
We'll see. 

Needless to say I welcome this 
amiability but view it with some 
hesitation. The idea of the 
beaurocrats turning over a new 
leaf just for us is a little hard to 
fathom. 

But, I'm not willing to look a 
gift horse in the mouth. I'll wait 
till the year progresses before I 
declare my hesitation unfounded. 
But along these same lines it 
should be clear that you, as 
students, can make a difference 
if you really want to. Write 
letters to the Call expressing 
your discontent about any issue 
you see is a problem. 

Keeping silent and assuming 
someone else will shoulder the 
responsibility will solve nothing. 

Only by speaking out can you 
make things happen. 

Hopefully, we haven't heard 
the last of the voices raised in 
protest. 

How about that tuition 
increase? 

Until next week. . . 




Vj- •>«• -C svt ^••^ 



The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 - Page 3 



Reader Responses 



Prbtesting 
library hours 

Dear Fellow Students: 
Welcome back to Clarion. 
During the past summer the 
University decided lo reduce 



Carlson Library's operating time 
by 15 hours per week for the fall 
1993 semester. This indicated 
the University's lack of 
responsibility to its students. 
Throughout the last week-and-a- 
half you, as a Clarion University 
student, have had no access to 
resource materials or study hall 



hours after 9:00 p.m., Sunday 
through Thursday at Carlson 
Library. The reason for the 
reduction (the University stated) 
was due to Gemmell Complex 
providing study hall service 
(which it doesn't) and reduced 
Carlson staffing. 

On Tuesday, September 7th, 



Welcome Back CUP Students 




FOUR 
S1AR 

%t... PiZZff 



%: 



226-8881 



•••• 



Sun-Wed 11AM-Midnight 
Thurs 11 AM- 1AM 
Frl-Sat11AM-2AM 



327 W. MAIN ST. CLARION, PA 



September 
Special 

Two 12" Cheese 
Pizza 



*••• 



Only $7.99 



plus tax 



$1.80/topping covers both pizzas 



We have 2 sizes of pizza 
to choose from: 
12" 8 slices 
16" 2 slices 

or 

6 different kinds of Subs 

Ham&Cheese Meatball Sub 
steak & Cheese Pizza Sub 
Italian Sub Veggie Sub 



svyr 

PIZZA 



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for two 

Only $6.00 

PLUS TAX 

Includes 12" one-item pizza 
plus 2 cups of Pepsi 

limited delivety area only Expires 9/30/93 



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Sub 
for two 

Only $4.50 

PLUS TAX 

Includes BIG 12" SUB plus 
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limited delivery area only Expires *30/93 



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I S1AR 

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Only $8.25 

PLUS TAX 

Includes 16" one-item pizza 
plus 4 cups of Pepsi 

limited delivery area only Expires 9/30/93 



Student Senate hosted an 
informal gathering of C.U.P. 
administrative leaders and C.U.P. 
student leaders. During the 
discussion, President Reinhard 
and Provost Kuhn agreed to 
negotiate a compromise with the 
student body concerning the 
library hours. Carlson Library 
will be open Sunday through 
Thursday until midnight but the 
study hall hours will be from 
9:00 p.m. till midnight. 

The main reasons for the 
reconsideration of the library 
hours is due to the great amount 
of student disapproval; it is 
because of you, the students who 
voiced your concerns and took 
the initiative to write and call 
President Reinhard. I am very 
proud of the student body here 
at Clarion. I only hope that this 
enthusiasm continues throughout 
the semester and year. Students, 
please do not hesitate about 
speaking out for what you 
believe is right. 

As I stated above, the 
University will be making its 
formal announcement regarding 
the library later this week. Please 
continue to write or call 
President Reinhard, 202 Carrier 
Hall, ext. 2220 and demand to 
have Carlson Library hours 
changed back to 92 hours per 
week instead of the 77 hours per 
week. Again, your prompt 
assistance is crucial to the 
outcome. If you have any 
questions, I can be contacted at 
the Student Senate office, ext. 
2318. Thanks again for your 
support. 

Sincerely, 
Gara L. Smith 
President, Student Senate 



Red Cross 

Volunteers 

Needed: 

Can you type, 

make phone 

calls, make 

posters? These 

things would be 

helpful to us . If 

you have a few 

hours and want 

to do a good. 

community 

service, please 

call the Clarion 

County Chapter 

Office at 

226-7040 



Dear Editor: 

As I walked down the sidewalk 
behind Carlson Library, I noticed 
there were words written in 
chalk on the cement below my 
feet. 

On closer inspection, I realized 
this was not mere graffiti from 
some overly bored vandal. These 
words were in protest of the new 
policy that Carlson Library 
closes at nine o'clock. "What's 
next? No breakfast?" 

As a transfer student, I had not 
even been thinking about 
computer or book accessibihty. It 
was my second day of classes, 
and I was more worried that I 
couldn't find the cafeteria. Once 
I figured out the basic 
dimensions of the campus, my 
mind wandered back to the chalk 
words that the rain had washed 
away. I questioned myself, "Why 
did I choose Clarion 
University?" Several things 
popped into my head, and one of 
them was the tour a now 
graduated student had given me 
on the day I came to visit the 
campus. One thing we both had 
in common is that we are both 
English majors. Any English 
major knows that half of all your 
free time is spent reading and 
researching, and the other half of 
your time is spent writing papers 
on a computer. One of the 
specific points she made to me 
was the long and great hours of 
the library and how easy it was 
lo get accessibility to a 
computer. 

I have no spirit for protest. I 
was bom in the 70's, not the 60's. 
I am glad someone else does. In 
one of my English classes a 
petition was passed around that 
was started by Student Senate 
asking that the library be open 
until midnight. I signed it of 
course, and along with this letter 
ru express my dissent. 

I wonder why a student can 
play pool or video games until 
eleven, but can only borrow a 
book from the hbrary until nine. 
I think Student Senate should 
fight and get petitions signed 
until justice . . .well, let's say 
fairness, is served. 

And if they cancel breakfast, 
then I'll protest. 



Christy Williams is a 
sophomore english secondary 
education and special education 
dual major 



Page 4 - The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 



Old library hours. . . 



(Cont. from pg. 1) 



Knickerbocker added that ihe 
library is feeling the financial 
crunch wiih the rest of the 
university which has resulted in 
the decline in the number of 
employees. 

As a result of the change in 
hours, Dr. Reinhard's office 
received over 100 letters, several 
petitions and approximately 50 
phone calls from angry students 
expressing their discontent v^ith 



the decision. 

During Tuesday night's 
meeting with student leaders. Dr. 
Reinhard said, "Students are 
more interested in having a 
facility open for study purposes 
rather than for actual library 
purposes." 

Provost Kuhn told the Call, 
"I'm glad the students have 
spoken forcefully on behalf of 
the library." 



He also said that the university 
had budgeted $347,973 in base 
support for materials for the 
1993-94 school year. 

In addition to the budgeted 
amount, added the Provost, the 
library had received an extra 
$50,000 for base support. The 
1993-94 library staff budget is 
estimated at $1.25 million. 



Tuition hike, . 



(Cont. from pg. 1) 



SSHE Vice-chancellor for 
Finance and Administration 
Wayne G. Failor. 

Still, that fails to set well with 
some out-of-state undergraduate 
students who have already 
completed a sizable portion of 
their education at SSHE schools. 

"It makes me very upset when 
my tuition increases, but at the 
same lime my quality of 
education decreases," said Sarah 
Cunningham, a senior English 
major from Hilo, Hawaii. "I 
went to Clarion because it was 
cheaper than private institutions, 
but now it's almost the same." If 
she were deciding where to 
attend college now, she said, she 
"definitely" would choose to go 
elsewhere. 

Ron Wilshire, director of 
University Relations said, "We 



were pleased that the tuition 
increase was held to under 4.5 
percent, but also said that the 
university is "concerned with the 
size of the tuition increase for 
out of state students and its 
impact on enrollment." 

According to Wilshire, 
preliminary enrollment figures 



show a 21 percent drop in out of 
state students and a 31 percent 
decrease in international 
students. It is not known if the 
rise in tuition affected these 
enrolhnents. 

Out of state students decreased 
from 310 to 243 and 
international from 125 to 86. 



Hide Park 

(Cont. from pg 2) 



of arm-twisting that bordered on 
pain, and one late night salvation 
of looming deadline and white 
space by a clever editor who 
reran an earlier Hide Park 
Column under the heading, 
reprinted by popular dem^d. 

In any event the column will 
continue, but only on demand. 
It's still an open invitation: come 



one - come all. 

The frequency of the column 
will be an indication of the 
vitality of debate on this campus, 
of the need for such a forum. 

A. Barlow is a professer in the 
Communication department at 
Clarion University as well as 
the Call's advisor. 



CATHOLIC CAMPUS MINISTRY 

FALL ACTIVITIES 

SUNDAY STUDENT MASS BEGINS SEPTEMBER 
12 AT I.e. CHURCH - 5:30 P.M. 

Mass is celebrated for the University community every Sunday during the 
semester at 5:30 p.m. (EXCEPT OCTOBER 1 7) 

NEWMAN ASSOCIATION MEETING - EVERY 
TUESDAY EVENING DURING THE SEMESTER. 

7:00 p.rn - Gemmell Student Center 

Saturday, September 1 1 C.U.P. FAMILY DAY 

After the picnic and football game have 
your family joinus at the 5:30 p.rn. mass at 
the I.e. Church. Refreshments will follow. 
FALL RETREAT WEEKEND 
Keystone State Park (between Indiana 
and Monroeville). We will join with 
students from I. UP. and California for this 
v.eekend retreat experience. We will leave 
after classes on Friday and return to 
Cainpus late Sunday afternoon. And in 
between . time to relax . . . make new 
friends . and reflect on new experiences. 
CANDLE LIGHT MASS TO 
CELEBRATE THE SEASON 

Fr. Monty's office hours at the United Campus Ministry Office - 

267 Gemmell Student Center (x2711) 
Monday 8-9 p.m., Tuesday 1:30-4:30 & 8-9 p.m. or call 226-6869 



Friday, Septefnber 24 - 
Sunday, September 26 



Sunday, December 13 




Carlson Library's hours for the fall semester are as follows: 

Sunday: 1:00 p.m. to midnight 

Monday through Thursday: 8:00 a.m. to midnight 

Friday: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Saturday: Noon to 5:00 p.m. 



Dave Barry 



What a way to go 



©1993 Miami Herald 



Eventually everybody has to 
die, except Elvis. You never 
know when your time will come. 
One minute you could be as 
healthy as a horse, and the next 
minute you could be killed by 
exploding bat dung. 

This is what nearly happened 
to rangers at Tahquamenon Falls 
State Park in Michigan, where, 
according to news articles sent in 
by many alert readers, a building 
was leveled by a monster blast -- 
audible 14 miles away -- that 
resulted when a sump pump 
spark ignited methane gas that 
had been generated by large 
quantities of bat dung. 
Fortunately nobody was in the 
building at the time except bats, 
whose names are being withheld 
pending notification of next of 
kin. 

But even if you do not set foot 
in Tahquamenon Falls State Park 
— and that is certainly my 
recommendation, at least until 
after the funeral services -- death 
can come at any time. In the 
words of the Old Testament 
prophet Abner, speaking in the 
Book of Longitudes, Chapter 
Nine, Verse Four, Sector Seven: 
"For whom amongst ye can 
know the exact day, nor hour, 
nor minute, nor GAAAACCCK 
(thud)." 

You want to spare your loved 
ones the pain and agony of 
having to make funeral 
arrangements for you later, at a 
time when, for example, they 
might have tickets to the 
playoffs. 

Now before I get a lot of irate 
mail from the funeral industry, 
let me stress that your modem 
bereavement counselor is NOT 
just out to make money. He is a 
highly trained professional who 
is interested only in servicing the 
family of the deceased at a very 
reasonable cost, if necessary 
("Well, Mrs. Deegle, if you're 
looking to save a few dollars, we 
offer a 'Basic' package that 
includes this durable, high- 
quality, four-ply 'Hefty' bag with 
a sturdy twist tie to . . ."). 

So make those arrangements 
NOW. And be sure to leave 



explicit written instructions wiUi 
your next of kin stating what 
kind of funeral service you want, 
ESPECIALLY what kind of 
music. I say this in light of an 
alarming article from The Star, 
sent in by Katherine Runyan, 
listing the most popular recorded 
songs played at funerals. These 
include "My Way," sung by 
Frank Sinatra ("Regrets, I've had 
a few, but then again, too few to 
mention"); and "Ben," sung by 
Michael Jackson. Correct me if 
I/m wrong here, bit isn't the song 
"Ben," from the movie "Ben," 
which is about a rat? Do you 
want Michael Jackson singing a 
love song to a RAT at your 
funeral? 

Of course not. You want 
something more suitable, such as 
- this would be my selection- 
"Mony Mony," by Tommy James 
and the Shondells. 

Another thing you definitely 
should do prior to dying is make 
sure you have a proper will. 
According to our nation's largest 
lawyer organization, the 
American Association of 
Aforementioned Legal 

Professionals, the best way to get 
a will is to copy down the 
following paragraph and sign it: 

"I, (YOUR NAME), being of 
sound mind and reasonable body 
do heretofore set forth the 
following (hereinafter 'the 
mortgages'), and do thereby 
attest and affirm thereto etc. blah 
blah blah there is no need to read 
this too carefully it's all just 
standard legal "boilerplate" blah 
blah blah and therefore I 
bequeath and bestow and begive 
all my money and everything to 
Dave Barry blah blah blah so I'll 
just sign this right now here I go 
I'm signing it (SIGN HERE). 

There! That pesky chore has 
been taken care of! Now you can 
forget about this morbid topic 
and get on with the rest of your 
life. Speaking purely as your 
friend, I reconunend some place 
with bats. 

Dave Barry is a 
syndicated columnist 
with the Miami Herald 



The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 - Page 5 




Summer events affect students and staff 



by Rodney K. Sherman 
News Editor 

Numerous events affecting 
Clarion University students 
happened over the summer 
months. Some affect the entire 
student population, some 
affected individual students. 

• Former Clarion University 
student John Avery Coy, 42, of 
Shippenville, pleaded guilty but 
mentally ill to a felony charge of 
aggravated assault, a felony 
charge of robbery and a 
misdemeanor charge of unlawful 
restraint Coy was sentenced to 
serve 6 to 12 years in a state 
penitentiary for his actions 
during a Nov. 12, 1992 incident 
at the Cranberry Mall near Oil 
City. 

Police said Coy attacked Karen 
Winger as she was leaving the 
Mall and forced her into her car 
where she was beaten with a ten 
inch cresent wrench before she 
escaped. 

Coy testified that he was 
under the care of a psychiatrist 
for bi-polar disorder and had 
stopped taking his prescribed 
medications at the time of the 
attack. The psychiatrist. Dr. 
Donald Hazlett of Franklin, said 
that Coy was in a manic state at 
the time of the attack and was 
close to becoming psychotic. 
Coy's decision to stop taking the 
medications was a key issue in 
the case. 

Julie Warnick, an Assistant 
Public Defender representing 
Coy, presented several letters 
sent to the court on behalf of 
Coy from several Clarion 
University professws where Coy 
was a student at the time of the 
attack. 

• A case involving Clarion 
University Student Senate Vice- 
President Michele J. Piccirillo 
has lead to a ruling by Judge 
Charles R. Alexander stating it is 
not necessary fcM" police to advise 
individuals stopped for routine 
u^affic stops that they have the 
right to remain silent. 

It is also not necessary for the 
police to have a chemical 
analysis performed on the 
beverage consumed by 
individuals suspected of 
underage drinking, according to 
the same ruling. 

Piccirillo was cited for 



underage consumption of alcohol 
on July 17, 1992. Piccirillo 
alledgedly admitted to drinking 
four "Bud Lights" and agreed to 
take a Portable Breath Test 
which showed her blood alcohol 
leve at .29. Pennsylvania's 
intoxication standard is .10. 

According to a Clarion News 
story, Piccirillo was found guilty 
at a summary trail Aug. 27, 1992 
and appealed the verdict to the 
Clarion County Court of 
Common Pleas on the grounds 
that her admission to drinking 
the four beers was given without 
her being advised of her right to 
remain silent. Piccirillo also 
claimed there was insufficent 
evidence to prove she had 
consumed beer. 

Alexander ruled against 
Piccirillo on both issues. 
Piccirillo did not appeal 
Alexander's decision and was 
fined. 

The decision could affect 
future arrest procedures in the 
borough involving under-age 
drinking. , 

• George Vargo, of Pittsburgh's 
North Side, was convicted of 
first degree murder in the 
shooting of former Clarion 
University student Michael 
Taylor. The shooting took place 
Sept 5, 1992 near the Allegheny 
County Observatory. Taylor was 
chaplain of the Tau Kappa 
Epsilion fraternity here. 

• Clarion University's Board of 
Trustees welcomed two new 
members, Michael Keefer, of 
Summerville, and Kim Kesner, 
of Clearfield. (See related story 
on page seven) 

Dr. Syed Ali-Zaidi was re- 
elected to a one year term as the 
chair of the Council of Trustees. 

• Clarion University received 
accreditarion from the 
Commission on Higher 
Education of the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and 
Schools. Strong points cited at 
CUP included strong academic 
support services, committment to 
global education and good 
academic equipment 

The reaccreditation committee 
described Venango campus as a 
"gem" with potential, but as yet 
unrealized, strength. Clarion 
campus was described as lovely 
and well maintained. 

The on-line student 




Public Affairs Photo 

John Stepulla (right) of plant services and student Scott Calderwood, a senior 
communications major, from Bradford, are shown during the placement of picnic tables on 
the north campus. Reservations for the tables can be made through the student activities 
office. Six new tables and two fire rings were added during the project. 
information system and selected by the Pennsylvania cataloging. 



telephone registration system 
were also very weU received. 

• CUP Trustees approved an 
increase in rates at the Siler 
Children's Center for the child 
care program and the Child 
Development Program. New 
fees will range from $1.50 to 
$2.50 per hour for the child care 
program. The fee for the Child 
Development Program will rise 
to $280 a semester for 1993-94, 
and to $330 for 1994-95. 
Family income will determine 
the child care rates. 

• U.S. Rep. WiUiam Clinger Jr., 
(R-5, which includes Clarion 
County) considered a bid for the 
U.S. Senate but decided not to 
run for the seat now held by 
Democrat Harris Wofford. 
Clinger feels he can better serve 
his district in the House of 
Representatives. 

• University president Dr. Diane 
L. Reinhard has been elected 
treasurer of the State System of 
Higher Education Commission 
of Presidents. In this capacity 
she also serves on die Executive 
Committee of the Chancellor's 
Executive Council. The two 
year term began July 1, 1993. 

• Kenneth Grugel, director of 
financial aid at CUP, has been 



Higher Education Assistance 
Agency (PHEAA) to serve a 
three-year term on the 
Pennsylvania Aid Adminstratiors 
Training Program, Planning and 
Program Development 

Committee. He was nominated 
for the position by the PASFAA 
executive council. 

In making die announcement 
of Grugel's selection, Barbara 
Williams, vice president for 
PHEAA Regional and Special 
Programs, acknowledged the 
many years of service Grugel has 
provided to PHEAA and state 
training efforts. 

• Dr. John Head, associate 
professor of library science, and 
Gerard McCabe, director of 
libraries at CUP, are the editors 
of a newly published book. 

"Insider's Guide to Library 
Automation, Essays of PracUcal 
Experience" was published by 
Greenwood Publishing Group 
Inc., of Westport, CT. 

The book, which took 18 
months from conception to 
publication, is a series of essays 
dealing with automation of 
libraries, automatic functions for 
acquistions, serial control, 
circulation and perhaps the most 
difficult to use well- automated 



• An increase in the late 
payment for all parking ticket 
violations issued by the Borough 
of Clarion Police is now in 
effect 

While original ticket fines 
remain unchanged, tickets not 
paid on the eighth day after 
receipt have been increased by 
an additional five dollars. 

After 12 days a citation will be 
issued. No extension will be 
granted. 

• Thomas E. Gusler was named 
associate provost for 
administration. The change in 
title from assistant academic vice 
president was announced by 
Provost John F. Kuhn. 

Gusler will continue in his 
current role managing computing 
services and institutional 
research, but his duties in 
budgeting and planning for both 
academic affairs and the 
university have been expanded. 

Gusler will also represent 
academic affairs concerning 
campus facilities. 

• Dr. Stephen Johnson has been 
named the new director for 
bands at CUP. Johnson earned 
his Ph.D in instrumental music 
education from the University of 
Maryland, College Park, MD. 



Page 6 - The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 

Clarion should "Get on with it" 



President Reinhard welcomes new year and new challenges 



compiled from speech text 

Clarion University prcsidcnl 
Dr. Disuic L. Rcinhjird welcomed 
sliidents and staff at the 
beginning of a new academic 
year August 31, 1993. 

In her address at Hart chapel 
Reinhard mentioned last year's 
cost reduction efforts and this 
year's on-going search for 
additional cost cutting measures. 
The university anticipated a 
$2.7 million shortfall in reaching 
a balanced budget for 1993-94. 

"I appreciated the genuine 
interest of faculty in helping to 
meet these (budgeting) 
challenges. Your willingness lo 
be flexible in providing courses 
and a few extra seats for 
students, agreeing to postpone 
sabbatical leaves and working 
with the Deans to examine issues 
of non-contractual release time 

CUP not affected 



was commendable," said 
Reinhiu"d. 

Reinhard announced her 
thanks to all the members of the 
committees involved in gaining 
Middle States reaccreditation. A 
special mention of thanks went 
to Professors Bill Sharpe and 
Ron Shumaker for their roles in 
the effort. 

Reinhard also complimented 
Dean Charles Duke, Professor 
Liz Brown and all the individual 
faculty members who 
participated in the work on 
behalf of Clarion's 

reaccreditation by the National 
Council for Accreditation of 
Teacher Kducation and the 
Pennsylvania Department of 
Education. Both organizations 
gave Clarion very positive 
comments. Reaccreditation is 
expected early this fall. 

During the past year, Clarion 



University made significant 
progress in meeting complex and 
demanding computer needs and 
services. 

The addition of Internet, for 
faculty and staff only, is now 
available at CUP, announced 
Reinhard. Internet is a world- 
wide computerized 
communication system. 
Reinhard feels the addition will 
enhance the university's 
potential to personalize contacts 
with prospective students. 

Addressing the future of CUP, 
Reinhard said "Clarion 
University can no longer afford 
to linger at the stage of 
discussion and analysis about 
how it will address its challenges 
or wait for better times, hoping 
certain issues go away." 
Reinhard stressed a need for the 
university to "get on with it," in 
four critical areas: enrollment 



management, the future of 
Venango Campus, general 
education reform and financial 
planning. 

"As we address these 
significant issues, and, indeed, as 
we pursue all areas of endeavor, 
I invite you to join me in making 
1993-94 a year of 'Focusing our 
Vision and Achieving our 
Goals,'" offered Reinhard. 

Reinhard announced searches 
will commence soon to fill the 
positions of Vice President for 
Financial and Administration 
and Dean of the College of Arts 
and Sciences. 

CcMiimittees have been formed 
for both and organizational 
meetings for both are be planned 
for this week. 

CUP new Vice President For 
University Advancement Mr. 
Harry Tripp was introduced by 
Reinhard, who said Tripp brings 



an "extensive background in 
development to his new role." 
Tripp assumed his duties July 1 , 
1993. 

Closing, Reinhard said, "The 
extent to which we are able to 
focus this year on the priorities I 
have discussed and get on with 
their achievement will determine 
our ability to shape our own 
future. 

"It will require teamwork, 
within and across divisions and 
between management and 
faculty. 

"It will also require an 
understanding that continued 
conversation or marginal 
changes in policies and 
procedures are simply not 
enough if we are to position 
Clarion University to grow in its 
ability to provide a quality 
education for those it serves. 
Thank you." 



Loan default rate threatens colleges and trade schools 



CPS- A new report by the 
Department of Education has 
students concerned over whether 
their school is on the list of 900 
colleges and trade schools that 
may lose federal loan funding 
due to high student loan default 
rales. 

For some of the threatened 
institutions, most of which are 
two-year, for-profit career 
schools, it could mean closing 
their doors, according to 
Stephanie Babyak, a 
spokesperson for the Department 
of Education. 

Kenneth Grugel, director of 
financial aid at Clarion 



University, said CUP is not 
affected by the default problem. 

The national default rate for 
federal student loans was 17.5 
percent in 1991, the latest year 
figures were available, a decline 
from 22.4 percent in 1990. 

"Defaults are one important 
measure of a school's 
performance," said U.S. 
Secretary of Education Richard 
W. Riley. "This year's overall 
rate drop shows most schools are 
taking their jobs seriously, but 
many others must do better." 

A law enacted in 1989 makes it 
possible for the Department of 
Education to eliminate funding 



to any school with a default rate 
of at least 30 percent over three 
consecutive years. The new 
report reflects figures from 1989, 
1990 and 1991. 

"We want students to know if 
they have a loan, and their 
school is out, they can continue 
to use that loan," Babyak said, 
noting that there are also special 
programs being set up that allow 
a student to continue his or her 
education at a neighboring 
school should a school close 
down. 

The schools can appeal and 
continue to receive funding until 
the appeal is exhausted, Babyak 




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said. 

"Schools must offer financial 
counseling. People need to 
understand their obligations to 
repay, their rights and 
responsibilities as borrowers," 
Babyak said, noting that in 
certain cases, students have not 
realized that a loan is not a grant, 
and that they had to pay back the 
money. 

It is also necessary for schools 
receiving funding to offer 
education and training to help 
students pay off their loans, 
Babyak said, "Some schools 
aren't doing this. They rush kids 
in the door, then out of the door," 
she said. 

Officials are concerned that 
many of the schools are not 
making certain that the students 
gets the training necessary to 
hold a job to pay back the loan 
when they graduate, Babyak 
said. 



In addition, colleges and trade 
schools must also make certain 
the student will benefit from the 
education. "For example, if a 
student doesn't speak English 
well, they need to take English 
language classes," she said. The 
department estimates that 
defaulted student loans will cost 
taxpayers $2.5 billion in the 
current fiscal year, down more 
than $1 billion from the 1991 
total of $3.6 billion. 

"By working closely with state 
agencies, we can better protect 
the taxpayers' and students' 
investment in education," said 
David Longanecker, assistant 
secretary for postsecondary 
education. 

Besides identifying the schools 
that may be disqualified from 
aid programs, the department 
released lender, guaranty agency, 
and state-by-state default rales 
for the first time. 



The Clarion Call news staff 

is in search of newswriters 

no experience needed 

all majors welcome 

freshmen encouraged 

call Rodney Sherman 

226-2380 



I 



CUP Board of Trustees 
names new members 



The Clarion Call - 9-9-93- Page 7 



by Christy Williams 
Newswriter 



After being nominated by 
Pennsylvania Governor Robert 
Casey and confirmed by the state 
senate, Mr. Micheal Keefer and 
Mr. Kim C. Kesner have been 
named as the newest members of 
the Clarion University Board of 
Trustees. 

Kesner is the son of Dr. and 
Mrs. L.E. Corbett, of 
Shippenville and the late Jay E 
Kesner. 

After graduating with honors 
from Keystone Oaks High 
School, Kesner was graduated 
Magna Cum Laude from Clarion 
State College in 1975 with a 
bachelor of arts degree in 
political science. 

Kesner received his Juris 
Doctorate from Duquesne 
University School of Law in 
1977. He was a member of the 
Duquesne Law review and 
served a clerkship with the 
Honorable Joseph F. Weis Jr. of 
the U. S. Court of Appeals for 
the Third Circuit. 

Kesner is currently a member 
of the bar of the U S. Supreme 




Public Affairs Photo 
New Trustee Kim C. Kesner 

Court, U. S. Court of Appeals for 
the Third Circuit, the U. S. 
District Court for the Western 
District of Pennsylvania and all 
Pennsylvania State Courts. 



Additionally, he is a member 
of the Pennsylvania Bar 
Association and the Clearfield 
County Bar Association. Kesner 
also serves as solicitor of 
Clearfield County, a position he 
has held since 1988. He is a 
partner in the law firm Sugrhue 




Public Affairs Photo 
New Trustee Michael Keefer 

and Kesner. 

"I look forward to my service 
with Clarion University," said 
Kesner. "I view the service as a 
reinvestment for those things my 
family, friends and I received 
through our education at 
Clarion." Kesner's family has a 
tradifion of earning a Clarion 
education, dating back to his 
grandmother, Elva Eraser, who 
graduated from Clarion Normal 
School. 

Although Michael Keefer, of 
Summerville, did not graduate 
from Clarion University, his 
wife, Cathy Rhoades Keefer, 
received her bachelor's degree in 
nursing from Clarion recently. 

"I have been in town seven 
years now, and 1 have been 
particularly impressed by 
Clarion," said Keefer, "I am 
pleased with my appointment 
and look forward to being an 
active member of the Council of 
Trustees." 

Keefer currently serves as 
administrator and CEO of 
Clarion Psychiatric Center. 




RayHenderson/Clarion Cal 

Kim Schwab, program administrator for the Northwest Pennsylvania Rural AIDS Alliance, 
at work in her office located in 202 Egbert. 

News Feature 

HIV/AIDS services available locally 



by Chris tin A. Mihon 
Newswriter 



Are you or someone you know 
directly affected by HIV or 
AIDS? The Western 

Pennsylvania Rural AIDS 
Alliance office, 202 Egbert, 
offers information and services 
to people in the 13 counties of 
Northwest Pennsylvania, 
(Cameron, Clarion, Clearfield, 
Crawford, Elk, Erie, Forest, 
Jefferson, Lawrence, McKean, 
Mercer, Venango, and Warren). 

The Alliance Hotline, 1-800- 
359- AIDS, is available to answer 
most questions from 8:30 am to 
4:30 pm, Monday through 
Friday. All contacts are 
confidential. Individuals with 
questions or concerns are 
encouraged to contact the 
Alliance. Education and 
awareness continue to be the 
biggest factors in halting the 
spread of the disease. 

The hotline operators are able 
to supply contact information for 
local HIV/AIDS Networks and 
Task Forces, answer questions 
about case management, give 
information about AIDS 



conferences and seminars, and 
access the caller with library 
materials available through the 
office. 

Jeanne Caldwell, Debbie 
Miller, and Tami Schilling are 
the three trained case managers 
employed by the alliance to 
provide assistance to individuals 
in obtaining financial support, 
housing, transportation, medical 
and dental care, pharmaceuticals 
and emotional support. Kim 
Schwab is the Administrator. 

The Western Pennsylvania 
HIV/AIDS Alliance is funded 
through the Department of 
Health via the Ryan White Title 
II Health Resources and Service 
Administration fund. The 
Alliance also has money 



available for pharmaceutical, 
physician and dental care. The 
Clarion University campus 
location was chosen for it's 
central locality and the public 
service offered. 

While speaking with Jeanne 
Caldwell I was surprized to learn 
that while HIV/AIDS resources 
and support remain lower in 
rural areas, it is exactly there that 
the percentage of people affected 
by HIV/AIDS continues to grow 
faster than that of urban areas. 

Ms. Caldwell also told me that 
most of the patients she is in 
contact with can trace the 
contraction of their disea.se back 
to their late teens or early 
twenties. 

Think about it. 



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Page 8 - The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 




Sparks campus debate 

University of Florida Student Government 
Association insurance will cover abortion 



Outside Clarion 



The Clarion Call - 9-9-93- Page 9 



Photo courtesy of Denny Rifenberrick 
Lightning struck this tree near Stevens Hall during a late 
August storm. The tree has been removed. 



CPS, GAINSVILLE, Fla. - 
Abortion is now covered under a 
student health insurance plan 
offered by the University of 
Florida Student Government 
Association beginning this fall, a 
move that angered anti- 
abortionists but won praise for 
those who support abortion. 

Dean of Student Affairs Art 
Sandeen said that of the 35,000 
students who attend Florida, the 
student government sells 
between 3,000 and 4,000 health 
insurance policies a year. Many 
of the policies are sold to older 
students who aren't financially 
dependent on their parents, he 
said. 

The student government voted 
in April to have a new company 
sell insurance on campus, and 
chose Scarborough Company 
Insurance. The company now 
provides students with two 
options of health insurance. Plan 
A, which costs $96 a year, 



Clarion University student sliphtlv injured 

Clarion borough police seek 
public assistance in assault case 



Clarion Borough police are 
investigating a possible assault 
on a Clarion University student. 
The incident happened August 
31, at approximately 1:24 a.m. 
The student received only minor 
injuries, suffering an abrasion on 
her left elbow. 

According to a news release 
from the borough police. Public 
Safety officers from Clarion 
University contacted Clarion 
Borough police to respond to an 
assault on Wilson Ave., adjacent 
to the CUP campus. 

An investigation revealed that 



the Public Safety officers had 
heard screams in the area and 
responded. They reportedly 
found a 21 -year-old female 
between Payne and Corbett 
streets. 

The alleged victim reported 
she was assaulted by a white 
male suspect near a residence in 
the area. 

The alleged victim said she 
was approached by the suspect, 
who asked for assistance. The 
suspect then allegedly spun the 
student around, placed her in a 
chokehold then placed a metal 




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object to her throat and told her 
to be quiet. 

The alleged victim struggled 
and screamed before falling to 
the concrete. At this point the 
suspect fled the scene. 

A passing motorist, driving 
what may have been a 1988-90 
dark colored Ford Mustang, 
stopped to speak to the alleged 
victim as the assault concluded. 
The driver was described as a 
white male in his early twenties. 

Clarion police are asking this 
person to contact borough police 
immediately. His information 
may be valuable in the on-going 
investigation. 

Police are looking for a 
suspect, described as: 

White male, late teens to 
early thirties in age. Tall and 
heavy set (not fat, but chubby), 
baby faced (roundish face), 
dark hair and dark eyes. 

Last seen wearing a dark tee- 
shirt and lighter colored 
shorts. 

The suspect fled on foot in 
the direction of Grand Ave. 

Anyone with information 
should call borough police at 
226-9140. 



doesn't cover abortion. 

However, Plan B, which costs 
$507 annually, includes up to 
$300 coverage for abortion. "I 
think that it is very unfortunate 
that the medical facilities at the 
University of Florida consider 
killing an unborn child as health 
related," said Lois Anne 
O'Malley, director of Gainesville 
Right to Life. "Pregnancy is not 
a disease, so there is no reason 
from a medical point of view, for 
the health of a woman, that all of 
a sudden this health coverage is 
available." 

Campus National Organization 
for Women co-president Pennie 
Foster told the Independent 
Florida Alligator that her 
organization is working to have 
abortion covered under the less- 
expensive policy. "It's only right 
that they include abortion on the 
policy," she told the campus 
newspaper. "No other medical 
procedure is discriminated 
against as much as abortion." 

Sandeen said that university 



officials have not had any 
complaints from parents or 
students yet. 'There has been no 
fallout to my knowledge," he 
said. Abortions on these policies 
are usually classified as "any 
other sickness," Sandeen said. 

O'Malley said her cM-ganization 
has no plans to protest the 
inclusion of abortion, but will 
continue to lecture against 
abortion on campus or wherever 
else they are invited to speak. 

"It's a real lack of moral 
commitment, a lack of self- 
esteem, that women seem to feel 
that they have to acquiesce to 
sexual pressures of society to 
prove themselves," she said. "In 
the end, the women are hit 
hardest with it, men don't have 
to go out and have abortions." 

Foster told the Alligator she is 
pleased with the abortion 
coverage. "This is a positive, 
especially for students, because 
younger women are affected 
more than any other group," she 
said. 



Public Safety 
Blotter 



The following is a brief synopsis of criminal investigations 
conducted by Public Safety for the week of August 30,1993 
through September 5, 1993. 

On August 30, at approxiamately 12:15 a.m., a female student was 
cited for Public Drunkenness after she was observed urinating 
between Chandler Dining Hall and Parking Lot "D". The student was 
then escorted to her room. 

A theft was reported to have occurred at the stadium training room 
when two Gott brand 106 quart coolers were reported missing. The 
coolers were last seen during the spring football i^ogram. The value 
of the coolers is approxiamately $175 each. 

At approxiamately 12:25 a.m., on September 3, an unknown 
person activated a smoke alarm on the first floor of Wilkinson Hall. 
The incident is currently under investigation. 



If anyone has any information concerning these or other crimes, 
please contact Public Safety at 226-2111. 



The Clarion Gall photography 

e^itorneeds staff 

photographers. AU majors 

welcome. Call Ray Henderson 

at 226-2380 or 227-2734. 



Clinton and Gore promise to make government work 



courtesy of Associated Press 

National 



Clinton backs Gore's reforms 

Seizing on public 
dissatisfaction with the 
government. President Clinton 
unvieled a plan engineered by 
Vice President Al Gore designed 
to shrink the federal workforce 
by as many as 252,000 people 
and save taxpayers an estimated 
$108 billion. 

"The government is broken, 
and we need to fix it," explained 
Clinton. 

The overhaul plan was 
developed by Gore over a six- 
month study period. More than 
half of the proposals would 
require congressional approval. 

Elders named Surgeon 
General 

Dr. Joycelyn Elders, President 
Clinton's choice for surgeon 
general was confirmed by the 
United States Senate Tuesday 
night. 

^f^Boaunation was debated 
six hours on the senate floor. 
Elders was not present for the 
final 65-34 vote. 

Elders had come under fire for 
some of her controversial 
decisions made while serving as 
the head of the Arkansas Health 
Department. 



Kansas abortion doctor shot 

An anti-abortion activist 
charged with wounding a doctor 
outside his abortion clinic was 
ordered Tuesday to stand trial on 
attempted murder and assault 
charges. 

During a preliminary hearing, 
two workers at Dr. George 
Tiller's clinic identified Rachelle 
"Shelly" Shannon, 37, of Grants 
Pass, Ore., as the woman who 
shot Tiller on Aug. 19 and 
pointed a gun at them. 

Judge Michael Corrigan 
ordered Shannon held in lieu of 
$1 million bail and scheduled 
trial for Nov. 15 on one count of 
attempted first degree murder 
and two counts of aggravated 
assault. 

Tiller described being shot as 
he pulled out of the driveway of 
his Women's Health Care 
Services clinic. 

He testified he was "absolutely, 
unequivocally terrified" as he 
chased a woman who had fired 
five shots and wounded him in 
both arms. 

Tiller said he drove after his 
attacker as she ran from the 
clinic, pulliag into a driveway 
ahead of her to cut her off He 
recalled realizing that he was 
putting himself in danger. "She's 
already shot me a couple of 
times. She could shoot me 
again. What am I doing here?" 

Shannon has been protesting 
abortions since 1988. 



State 



Another entrant for governor 
race 

Earl Baker, a state senator 
from the Philadelphia area, is the 
latest candidate to announce his 
intention to run for Pennsylvania 
governor. 

Baker, during a news 
conference, said he advocates a 
suing of business tax cuts, paid 
for by cuts in government 
spending cuts and a reduction in 
bureaucratic red tape. 



Casey visits hometown over 
Labor Day weekend 

Gov. Robert Casey spent tlie 
Labor day weekend back at his 
old hometown in Scranton, his 
first there since his June heart- 
liver U"ansplant. 

Casey and his wife, Ellen, 
were driven to Scranton on 
Saturday. They spent the 
weekend with family and 
returned to Harrisburg by car on 
Monday. Casey said he felt fine 
following the trip. 

Casey was discharged from a 
Pittsburgh hospital July 27. 



Women's group in court 

Women's right's lawyers asked 
a federal judge in Philadelphia 
Tuesday to hold the nationwide 
Operation Rescue and four other 
of its anti-abortion organizers in 
contempt of court for violating 
an injuction restraining them 
from blocking abortion clinics. 

"It is time their mob rule 
tactics were stopped," said Linda 
Wharton, an attorney for the 
Women's Law Project, which 
filed the notion with U.S. 
District Judge Clarence 
Newcomer. 





News 



courtesy of 

College Press Service 

Woman can't enroll at the 
Citadel 

A federal judge has ruled 
against Shannon R. Faulkner, 18, 
of South Carolina, in her bid to 
become the first female to attend 
the state-run, all-male military 
institution. 

Faulkner deleted references to 
her gender on her application 
form and was originally 
accepted. 



RAX 

"All You Can Eat" 
SPECIALS 

(includeing endless food bar) 

Wed. & Thurs....- Wings (deep fried & buffalo) $4.29 ii am-s pm 

Friday. - Seafood Buffet $5.99 4 pm- 9 pm 

Saturday - Pizza and Lasagna $4.99 11 am-spm 

Sunday. - Breakfast Buffet $4.29 9 am- 2 pm 

Sunday. - Turkey Buffet (Carve it yourself) $5.99 ham- s pm 

Located Across from the Clarion Mall 

STUDENT DISCOUNT CARDS AVAILABLE 



Harvard tests male 
contraceptive 

A male contraceptive that 
blocks the production of sperm 
while preserving the libido has 
been tested and found successful 
by Harvard medical researchers. 

The contraceptive, which is 
given by injection, surpressed 
sperm production in over a 
dozen volunteers who reported 
no loss in sexual desire. When 
the injections were terminated, 
sperm counts returned to normal 
within approximately 90 days, 
the Harvard Gazette reported. 

At this point in the testing, 
volunteers had to submit to a 
daily injection, which chief 
researcher Syros Pavlou termed 
"not practical." He said, 
however that several 
laboratories were attempting to 
create a longer-lived injection, a 
birth-control nasal spray or an 
underskin implant. 

Employment outlook brightens 

The hiring outlook is 
improving for the fourth quarter 
and should exceed hiring 
patterns from a year ago, said 
the Employment Oudook Survey 
conducted by Manpower. 

In a survey of nearly 15,000 
U.S. firms, Manpower found that 
22 percent of the businesses 
surveyed are planning to hire, 
compared to 2 1 percent last year. 

Employers in the Northeast 
and West will be hiring below 
the national level, the Midwest at 
about 22 percent, and the SouUi 
above the average. 



Service with a smile 

Texans apparently have a 
different style of helping new 
and returning students move into 
their dorms - at least at the 
University of Texas at Austin. 

President Robert Berdahl and 
about 300 other faculty and staff 
members participated in the 
"Mooov In" event in late 
August, officials said. 

The volunteers were stationed 
at four residence sites. As 
students and their parents drove 
up to move in, the volunteers 
assisted by carrying boxes, 
luggage, stereos and oUier items 
into dorm rooms. A campus 
news release said the first ever 
event was designed to give the 
students an informal "Texas 
style" howdy. 

You may be wondering just 
why it was called a "Mooov In." 
The University of Texas teams 
are called the Longhoms, that's 
why. 

Students support speech code 

Just over half of Stanford 
University .seniors questioned in 
a recent poll said they support 
the university's policy on free 
expression, and 80 percent said 
they do not feel Uiat it hindered 
bringing up sensitive subjects in 
the classroom. 

Stanford adopted a policy 
entitled "Fundamental Standard 
Interpretation: Free Expression 
and Discriminatory Harassment" 
after concern mounted over 
racially-motivated incidents 
which occurred on the campus. 



I'asc S - The Clurion Call - *)-9.93 




Sparks campus debate 

University of Florida Student Government 
Association insurance will cover abortion 



Photo courtesy of Denny Rifenberrick 
Lightning struck this tree near Stevens Hall during a late 
August storm. The tree has been removed. 



CPS, (iAINSVILLH, Fla. - 
Abortion is now covered under a 
student health insurance plan 
offered by the University of 
Florida Student Government 
AssiKialion beginning this fjdl, a 
move that angered anti- 
abortionists but won praise for 
those who supptirt abortion. 

Dean of Student Affairs Art 
Sandeen siiid that of the 35,000 
students who attend Florida, the 
student government sells 
between 3,000 and 4,000 health 
insurance policies a year. Many 
of the policies are sold to older 
students who aren't financially 
dependent on their parents, he 
said. 

llie student government voted 
in April to have a new company 
sell insurance on campus, and 
chose Scarborough Company 
Insurance. The company now 
provides students with two 
options of health insurance. Plan 
A, which costs $96 a year, 



Clarion University student slightly injured 

Clarion borough police seek 
public assistance in assault case 



Clarion Borough police are 
investigating a possible assault 
on a Clarion University student. 
The incident happened August 
31, at approximately 1:24 a.m. 
Ilie student received only minor 
injuries, suffering an abrasion on 
her left elbow. 

According to a news release 
from the borough police, I^blic 
Safety officers from Clarion 
University contacted Clarion 
Borough police to respond to an 
assault on Wilson Ave., adjacent 
U) the CUP campus. 

An investigation revealed that 



the Public Safety officers had 
heard screams in the area and 
responded. They reportedly 
found a 21-year-old female 
between Payne and Corbett 
streets . 

The alleged victim reported 
she was assaulted by a white 
male suspect near a residence in 
the area. 

The alleged victim said she 
was approached by the suspect, 
who asked tor assistance. The 
suspect then allegedly spun the 
student around, placed her in a 
chokehold then placed a metal 




CH SHOP 

BOB'S WELCOME BACK SPECIAL 

[ BUY ANY SENIOR SUB RECEIVE 

j ONE JUNIOR OF YOUR (^HOICE FOR $1.00 

Spend Huh (-ash .... (i(t seniceJdsi 



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Carry Out Only 501 MAIN SI 

Not valid with any other offer. 



object to her throat and told her 
to be quiet. 

The alleged victim struggled 
and screamed before falling to 
the concrete. At this point the 
suspect fled the scene. 

A passing motorist, driving 
what may have been a 1988-90 
dark colored Ford Mustang, 
stopped to speak to the alleged 
victim as the assault concluded. 
The driver was described as a 
white male in his early twenties. 

Clarion police are asking this 
person to contact borough police 
immediately. His information 
may be valuable in the on-going 
investigation. 

Police are looking for a 
suspect, descTibed as: 

White male, late teens to 
early thirties in age. Tall and 
heavy set (not fat, but chubby), 
baby faced (roundish face), 
dark hair and dark eye.s. 

Last seen wearing a dark tee- 
shirt and lighter colored 
shorts. 

The suspect fled on foot in 
the direction of Grand Ave. 

Anyone with information 
should call borough police at 
226-9140. 



d(x,'sn't cover abortion. 

However, Plan B, which costs 
$507 annually, includes up to 
$300 coverage for abortion. "I 
think that it is very unfortunate 
that the medical facilities at the 
University of l-lorida consider 
killing an unborn child as health 
related," said Lois Anne 
O'Malley, director of Gainesville 
Right to Life. "l\egnancy is not 
a disease, so there is no reason 
from a medical point of view, for 
the health of a woman, that all of 
a sudden this health coverage is 
available." 

Campus National Organization 
for Women co-president Pennie 
Foster told the Independent 
Florida Alligator that her 
organization is working to have 
abortion covered under the less- 
expensive policy. "It's only right 
that they include abortion on the 
policy," she told the campus 
newspaper. "No other medical 
procedure is discriminated 
against as much as alxMtion." 

Sandeen said that university 



officials have not had any 
complaints from parents or 
students yet. " Ihere has been no 
fallout to my knowledge," he 
said. Abortions on these policies 
are usually classified as "any 
other sickness," Sandeen said. 

O'Malley said her organization 
has no plans to protest the 
inclusion of abortion, but will 
continue to lecture against 
abortion on campus or wherever 
else they are invited to .spciik. 

"It's a real lack of moral 
commitment, a lack of self- 
esteem, that women seem to feel 
that they have to acquiesce to 
sexual pressures of society to 
prove themselves," she said. "In 
the end, the women are hit 
hardest with it, men don't have 
to go out and have abortions." 

Foster told the Alligator she is 
pleased with the abortion 
coverage. "This is a positive, 
especially for students, because 
younger women are affected 
more than any other group," she 
said. 



Public Safety 
Blotter 



The following is a brief synopsis of criminal investigations 
conducted by Public Safety for the week of August 30,1993 
through September 5, 1993. 

On August 30, at approxiamately 12:15 a.m., a female student was 
cited for Public Drunkenness after she was observed urinating 
between Chandler Dining Hall and Parking Lot "D". The student was 
then escorted to her room. 

A theft was repealed to have cKcurred at the stadium training room 
when two Gott brand 106 quart coolers were reported missing. ITie 
coolers were last seen during the spring football program. The value 
of the coolers is approxiamately $175 each. 

At approxiamately 12:25 a.m., on September 3, an unknown 
person activated a smoke alarm on the first floor of Wilkinson Hall. 
The incident is currently under investigation. 



If anyone has any information concerning these or other crimes, 
please contact Public Safety at 226-2111. 



The Clarion Call photography 

editor needs staff 

photographers. All majors 

welcome. Call Ray Henderson 

at 226-2380 or 227-2734. 



Outside Clarion 



The Clarion Call - y-9.y.V I'asc 9 



Clinton and Gore promise to make government work 



courtesy of Associated Press 

National 



Clinton backs Gore's refornis 

Seizing on public 
dissatisfaction with the 
government. President Clinton 
unvieled a plan engineered by 
Vice Resident Al Gore designed 
to shrink the federal workforce 
by as many as 252,000 people 
and save taxpayers an estimated 
$108 billion. 

"The government is broken, 
and we need to fix it," explained 
Clinton. 

The overhaul plan was 
developed by Gore over a six- 
month study period. More than 
half of the proposals would 
require congressional approval. 

Elders named Surgeon 
General 

Dr. Joycelyn Elders, President 
Clinton's choice for surgeon 
general was confirmed by the 
United States Senate Tuesday 
night. 

Her nomination was debated 
six hours on the senate floor. 
Elders was not present for the 
final 65-34 vote. 

Elders had come under fire for 
some of her controversial 
decisions made while serving jls 
the head of Uie Arkansas Health 
Department. 



Kansas abortion doctor shot 

An anti-abortion activist 
charged with wounding a dwtor 
outside his abortion clinic was 
ordered Tuesday to stxind U-ial on 
attempted murder and assault 
charges. 

During a preliminary heiuing, 
two workers al Dr. George 
Tiller's clinic identified Rachelle 
"Shelly" Shannon, 37, of Grants 
Pass, Ore., as the woman who 
shot Tiller on Aug. 19 and 
pointed a gun at them. 

Judge Michael Corrigan 
ordered Shannon held in lieu of 
$1 million bail and scheduled 
trial for Nov. 15 on one count of 
attempted first degree murder 
and two counts of aggravated 
assault. 

Tiller described being shot as 
he pulled out of the driveway of 
his Women's Health Care 
Services clinic. 

He testified he was "absolutely, 
unequivocally terrified" as he 
chased a woman who had fired 
five shots and wounded him in 
both arms. 

Tiller said he drove after his 
attacker as she ran from the 
clinic, pulling into a driveway 
ahead of her to cut her off. He 
recalled realizing that he was 
putting himself in danger. "She's 
already shot me a couple of 
times. She could shoot me 
again. What am I doing here?" 

Shannon has been protesting 
abortions since 1988. 



State 



Another entrant for governor 
race 

Earl Baker, a state senator 
from the Philadelphia <u"ea, is the 
latest candidate to announce his 
intention to run for Pennsylvania 
governor. 

Baker, during a news 
conference, said he advocates a 
string of business tax cuts, paid 
for by cuts in government 
spending cuts iuid a reduction in 
bureaucratic red tape. 



Casey visits hometown over 
Labor Day weekend 

Gov. Robert Casey spent tlie 
Labor day weekend back at his 
old hometown in Scranion, his 
first there since his June heiu't- 
liver iTiinsplant. 

Casey and his wife, Ellen, 
were driven to Scranton on 
Saturday. They spent the 
weekend with family and 
returned to Harrisburg by car on 
Monday. Casey .said he felt line 
following the U"ip. 

Gasey was dischiirged from a 
Pittsburgh ho.spital July 27. 



Women's group in court 

Women's right's lawyers asked 
a federal judge in Philadelphia 
Tuesday to hold the nationwide 
Operation Rescue imd four other 
of its anti-abortion organizers m 
contempt of court lor violating 
an injuction restraining them 
from blocking abortion clinics. 

"It is time their mob rule 
tactics were stopped," s[iid Linda 
Wharton, an attorney for the 
Women's Law Project, which 
filed the notion with U.S. 
District Judge (Tarence 
Newcomer. 





News 



courtesy of 

College Press Service 

Woman can't enroll at the 
Citadel 

A federal judge has ruled 
against Shannon R. Eaulkner, 18, 
of South Carolina, in her bid to 
become the first female to attend 
the state-run, all-male military 
insUtulion. 

Faulkner deleted references to 
her gender on her application 
form and was originally 
accepted. 



RAX 

"All You Can Eat" 
SPECIALS 

(includeing endless food bar) 

Wed. & Thurs....- Wings (deep fried & buffalo) $4.29 11 am- s pm 

Friday - Seafood Buffet $5.99 4 pm- 9 pm 

Saturday - Pizza and Lasagna $4.99 11 am-spm 

Sunday - Breakfast Buffet $4.29 9 am- 2 pm 

Sunday - Turkey Buffet (Carve it yourseio $5.99 ham- 8 pm 

Located Across from the Clarion Mall 

STUDENT DISCOUNT CARDS AVAILABLE 



Harvard tests male 
contraceptive 

A male contraceptive that 
blocks the production of spenn 
while preserving the libido has 
been tested and found successful 
by Harvard medical reseiirchers. 

The contraceptive, which is 
given by injection, surpressed 
sperm production in over a 
dozen volunteers who reported 
no loss in sexual desire. When 
the injections were terminated, 
sperm counts returned to normal 
within appro.ximately 90 days, 
the Harvard Gii/ette reported. 

At this point in the testing, 
volunteers had to submit to a 
daily injection, which chief 
researcher Syros Pavlou termed 
"not practical." He said, 
however. that several 
laboratories were attempting to 
create a longer-lived injection, a 
birth-control nasal spray or an 
underskin imphmt. 

Employment outlook brightens 

The hiring outlook is 
improving for the fourth quiu"ter 
and should exceed hiring 
patterns from a yeiu- ago, said 
the HmplovTHcnt ()utJ(X)k Survey 
conducted by Manp<wer. 

In a survey of neiu^ly l*i,0(X) 
U.S. firms. Manpower found that 
22 percent of the businesses 
surveyed are planning to hire, 
compared to 21 percent last year. 

limployers in the Northeast 
and West will be hiring below 
the national level, the Midwest at 
about 22 percent, and the South 
above the average. 



Service with a smile 

Texans apparently have a 
different style of helping new 
and returning students move into 
their dorms - at least at the 
University of Texas at Austin. 

President Robert Berdahl and 
about ?>0() other faculty and staff 
members participated in the 
"Mooov In" event in late 
August, officials siiid. 

Ilie volunteers were stationed 
at four residence sites. As 
students and their parents drove 
up to move in, the volunteers 
assisted by carrying boxes, 
luggage, stereos and other items 
into dorm rooms. A campus 
news release said the first ever 
event was designed to give the 
students an informal "Texas 
style" howdy. 

You may be wondering just 
why it was called a "Mcxxn' In." 
The University of Texas iciuns 
are called the Longhorns, that's 
why. 

Students support speech code 

Just over half of Stanford 
University seniors questioned in 
a recent poll said they support 
the university's policy on free 
expression, and HO percent said 
they do not leel that it hindered 
bringing up sensitive subjects in 
the classrmMn. 

Stanford adopted a policy 
entitled "Fundmnental Standiu-d 
Interpretation: I ree Hxpression 
and Discriminatory Harassment" 
after concern mounted over 
racially -motivated incidents 
which (K'curred on the cjunpus. 



Page 10 - The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 

Cable Chi.nnels 




THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 9, 1903 1 




4:00 1 4:30 


5:00 1 5:30 | 6:00 


6:30 1 7:00 | 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 


9:00 1 9:30 1 10:00 | 10:30 


11:00 11:30 


12:00 


2 


(3:00) Buddy Holly" 


: *** ■■Beetleiuice'{\%d, Comedy) PG 


: ♦♦♦ The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976, Western) Clint Eastwood. PG 


: ♦*V2 'Quick "{mz, Drama) Ten Polo (In Stereo) R' g 


Inside the NFL g 


"Sexual R. " 


4 


Donahue (In Stereo) Q 


Newsg 


Newsg 


Newsg 


ABC News 


Hard Copy g 


Ent. Tonight 


Missing Persons "Pilot' (R) 


In Stereo) g 


Primetime Live g 


Newsg 


Cheers g 


Nightline g 


6 


Edition | Cheers g 


Cheers g 


News 


News 


NBC News 


Jeopardy! g 


Wh. Fortune 


Mad- You 1 Wings (R) g 


Seinfeld "The Pilot" (R) g 


Larroquette [Second Half 


News 


Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 1 


7 


Oprah Winfrey g 


Design. W. 


Murphy B. 


News 


CBS News 


Copsg 


Married... 


Billy Graham Crusade g 


Eye to Eye (In Stereo) g 


Angel Falls "Traps ' g 


News 


Late Show (In Stereo) g I 


8 


Les Brown 


Oprah Winfre) 





Newsg 


CBS News 


Am.Journal 


Billy Graham Crusade g 


Eye to Eye (In Stereo) g 


Angel Falls "Traps" g 


Newsg 


Edition 


Late Straw gl 


10 


Beetiejuice 


Tom-Jerry 


Tiny Toon 


Batman g 


Full House g|Ro8eanne g 


Roseanne g 


Married... 


Simpsons g 


Living Single 


In Color iHerman 


Mama 


MarrM... 


Chevy Chase In Stereo) g 


Night Court | 


11 


Copsg 


Cur. Affair 


Newsg 


Newsg 


NBC News 


Jeopardy! Q 


Wh. Fortune 


Mad-You 


Wings (R) g 


Seinfeld "The Pilot" (R)g 


Larroquette 


Second Half 


Newsg iTonight Show (In Stereo) Q 


14 


(3 00) Montun i]%b) 


: «*♦ A High Wind'm Jama/ca" (1965) Anttiony Quinn 


: ♦** 'Move Over. Dartn^ (1963, Comedy) Dons Day. 


: ** "Author! Author! ' {]%2, Comedy) Al Pacino. PG' 


: **V2 "The Fortune" {W5) PG' 


17 


PGA Golf: Canadian Open -- First Round. (Live) 


Sf.PGA 


Up Close 


Sportscenter 


CoHefie Foott)^: Syracuse at East Carolina (Live) 


Baseball Sportscenter 


18 


U.S. Open Tennis: Mixed Doubles Final 


G.I. Joe 


Ghostbust. 


Uncle Buck 


U.S. Open Tennis: Mixed Doubles Final and Men s Quarterfinals. (Live) g 


Quantum Leap (In Stereo) | Equalizer 


21 


(3.15) S/ess-Seasfs |: ♦* "Buckeye and Blue '{^9B6)^PG 


■Naked Gun 2 1/2: Fear ' 


: ** "Moving" {]%&) Richard Pryor R' g|: ♦♦ "Almost Pregnant" {^%2) R' 


: ♦ "Hellmaster i\m] John Saxon. NR' 


22 


(3:00) 


: ♦** 'The Band Wagon (1953, Musical) Fred Astaire. 


"Cheech & Chongs Corsican Brothers 


: ♦* "The Mean Season ' (1985) Kurt Russell. 'R' 


Fallen 


Angels 


: "Delta Force 3. The Killing Game" (1991) 


25 


Underdog 


Muppets |HeyDude(R)|Quts 


What You Do 


Crazy Kids 


Looney jBullwinkle 


Partridge Get Smart 


Dragnet |Van Dyke 


M.T. Moore 


M.T. Moore 


Lucy Show |A. Hitchcock Superman 


26 


: t*'/? -Valley of the Dolls (1967, Drama) Patty Duke. 


Supermarket 


Shop-Drop 


Unsolved Mysteries 


L.A. Law 


: **♦ "Absolute Strangers" 099^) Henry Winkler. 


Unsolved Mysteries 


Mysteries I 



FRIDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 10. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



(3 30) Sylvester" jmS] Q 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 



Edition 



U.S. Open Tennis 



[Cheers g 



U.S. Open Tennis 



Beetiejuice Tom-Jerry 



Cops ! 



Cur. Affair 



(3 30) The Fortune (Wb) 



5:00 



5:30 



: ♦♦ The Cannonball Run' 



Newsg 



Cheers g 



Design. W. [Murphy B 



Newsg 



1981) Burt Reynolds PG 



News 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Tiny Toon [Batman g 



News g 



6:00 



6:30 



News g ABC News 



News 



News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsg 



Full House g Roseanne g 



News g 



NBC News 



PGA Golf: Canadian Open - Second Round (Live) 



There s No Business Like Show Business' (1954) 



Pyramid [Pyramid [Two Dads [Ten of Us 



(3.45) **v? "Fat Man and Little Boy (1989) PG-13' g 



: **''2 "Cabin in the Sky (1943, Musical) Ethel Waters. 
Underdog jMuppets [Hey Dude (R)|Guts 



*• "A Change of Seasons (1980) Shirley Madame 



Yearbook Up Close 



G.I. Joe 



Ghostbust. 



7:00 



7:30 



Inside the NFL (R) g 



Hard Copy g Ent. Tonight 



Jeopardy! g 



Copsg 



CBS News 



Roseanne g 



Jeopardy! g [Wh. Fortune 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



Am.Journal 



Married... 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



: *V2 "Showdown in Little roAyo (1991 



. f* f£ uuunuurrii III uttiv /unyu pjji; viy|/t i pica 

Family [Thea (R) g [Step by Step Mr. Cooper 

AwAkeninn I anil (Rl Hn c;torsnt /Part 9 nf ^\ n 



9:30 



Crypt Tales 



Awakening Land (R) (In Stereo) (Part 2 ot 3) g 



How'd They Do That? (R) g The Building Boys g 



How'd They Do That? (R) g 



Brisco County, Jr. 



The Building [Boys g 



X-Files q 



*♦ 



■The Sluggers Wife" (1985) Michael Keefe. 



Awakening Land (R) (In Stereo) (Part 2 of 3) g 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



■** "flap/dF/Ae (1992) Brandon Lee. 'R' 



20/20 g 



Trade Winds (In Stereo) g 



Picket Fences "Sightings ' 



Picket Fences "Sightings" 



Mama 



Manied... 



♦* 



Trade Winds (In Stereo) g 



Sportscenter [Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced (Live) 



Bloodhounds of Broadway' {^98B) Madonna. PG 



Newsg 



News 



Cheers g 



News 



Newsg 



Chevy Chase (In Stereo) g 



11:30 



Sanders 



12:00 



Comedy Jam 



Nightline g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Late Show (In Stereo) g 



Edition 



Late Show g 



Night Court 



News g [Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



** 



The Survivors" (1983, Comedy) R' 



MacGyver The Survivors ' 



*•• 



■Irreconcilable Differences' (1984) Ryan O'Neal, g 



»*V2 ■Gross Anatomy' (1989) Matthew Modine. g 



What You Do 



Supermarttet 



Crazy Kids 



ShO£;DrO£_ 



Looney 



Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Murder, She Wrote g 



**V2 "Extreme Prejudice ■ (\W , Drama) Nick Nolle 



Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live; 



**V2 "Story of Boys and Girls" (1991) [: ♦•V2 'Poison />^k" (1992, Suspense) R 



*♦♦ 



The Player" {)922, Satire) Tim Robbins. 'R' g 



Partridge [Get Smart 



L.A. Law 



Altman 



"The Sex Puppets (1993) Dana Plato. 



*** 



Dragnet [Van Dyke [M.T. Moore |m.T. Moore [Lucy Show 



Sex, Shock & Censorship 



'Alien 3 ' (1992) Sigourney Weaver. 



**V2 "Farewell to the King' (^%9, Drama) Nick Nolle, Nigel Havers. 



** 'The Other Woman' 



A. Hitchcock [Superman 



Unsolved Mysteries 



SATURDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 11. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



*'2 



"Caddyshack // "(1988) Jackie Mason. PG' g 



College Football: Regional Coverage 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



**'/2 'The Jewel of the Nile" (1985) Kathleen Turner, g 



War by the Shore 



[Drag Racing: US. Nat Is [News 



NBC News 



U.S. Open Tennis: Women's Final and Men's Semifinals (Live) g 



U.S. Open Tennis: Women's Final and Men s Semifinals (Live) g 



(3:00) 'e/qS/iote (1987) 



War by the Shore 



American Gladiators 



Drag Racing: US Nat Is 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



News g [NBC News 



(3:30) Bloodhounds Of Broadway (^989) [: *** 'I Deal in Danger' {]%&) 



PGA Golf: Canadian Open - Third Round. (Live) 



(3 00) 4fl HAS (1982) [Gossip! 



B. Buddies 



Greysloke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes' 



(3 30)*** Farandylwat^' 1992) Tom Cruise 'PG-13' 



Can't on TV Arcade 



Freshmen Salute 



Man Against the Mob T he Chinatow n Murders (1989) 



Horse R. [Sportscenter 



Swamp [Beyond 



News g 



Night Court 



Jefferson 



Wh. Fortune 



Untouchables (In Stereo) g 



Crusaders 



Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



Jeopardy! g jWh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



10:00 



*** 



"And the Band Played On" (1993, Drama) Matthew Modine. g 



College Football: Washington at Ohio State. (Live) g 



10:30 



Dream On g 



Empty Nest [Empty Nest 



Medicine Woman 



Medicine Woman 



Copsg 



Empty Nest 



Cops (R) g 



Empty Nest 



*** 



■Dear Bngitte" (1965, Comedy) James Stewart. 



"Miss America: Behind the Crown" (1992, Drama) g 



■■For Love and Gfory (1993, Drama) Robert Foxworth. 



■'For Love and Glory" (1993, Drama) Robert Foxworth. 



Front Page (In Stereo) g j Catwalk "First Gig' (R) 



"Miss America: Behind the Crown' (1992, Drama) g 



Football [College Foottiall: Georgia at Tennessee. (Live) 



: **V2 "ffo//fes "(1980, Adventure) Roger Moore. PG 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



** "Loverboy [\989] Patrick Dempsey 'PG-13' g 



**V2 "Housesitter" {m2, Comedy) Steve Martin. 'PG' 



Double Dare [Legends [Doug 



[Rugrats 



: **V2 ''Pink Lightning" (\m , Comedy) Sarah Buxton. 



*** 



"Trading P/aces' (1983, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, Dan Aykroyd 



**y2 "One False Move"' (1991) Bill Paxton. 'R' 



*** 



"S/ste/-/4cr(1992) Whoopi Goldberg. PG' g 



Clarissa [Roundhouse [Ren-Stimpy [You Afraid? 



*♦* "Prison Stories: Women on the Inside' 



(1991) 



Football 



11:00 



Crypt Tales 



Newsg 



News 



News 



Newsg 



11:30 



12:00 



*** 'The Untouchables' 



Design. W. [Ent. Tonight 



Saturday Night Live (R) 



Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



Untouchables (In Stereo) g 



Comic Strip Live (In Stereo) [Arsenio Hall 



News g [Saturday Night Live (R) 



**V2 ""/Legend' (1985) Tom Cruise. PG' 



Baseball 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) g 



*V2 ■■Protect: Shadowchaser {}992) R 



*•* 



■■Honeymoon in Vegas" (1992) g 



Sportscenter [NASCAR 



** 



"The Toxic Avenger " 



"r/;eStvordsmaff"(1992) 



Very Very Nick at Nite 



"When Stranger 



Hidden [Hidden [Unsolved Mysteries 



Superman 



China Beach 



SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 12, 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(3:00) 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



** 



■■Dream Machine' {^99^) PG' g 



(3:30) ***'/? "Meet John Doc (1941) Gary Cooper. 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



** ■Big Girls Don't Cry... they Get Even" (1992) 'PG 



Newsg 



ABC News 



NFL Football: Pittsburgh Steelers at Los Angeles Rams. From Anaheim Stadium. 



U.S. Open Tennis: Mens Final. (Live) g 



U.S. Open Tennis: Men's Final. (Live) g 



**'^ ■The Shaggy DA. " (1976, Comedy) Dean Jones. [Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



NFL Football: Pittsburgh Steelers at Los Angeles Rams. From Anaheim Stadium 



(3:00) •*V2 ■ffolkes" (\9B0) \: **'; "Legend' {)%5) Tom Cruise. PG' [Short Sub. 



PGA Golf: Canadian Open - Final Round. (Live) 



(2:30) Trading Places 



(3:30) Top Secrer^' (1984) 



Gossip! 



[Sister Sam 



Baseball Tonight 



Two Dads 



** 



"3 A/OT/as "(1992) Victor Wong. PG 



Can't on TV Arcade 



[Wild Side 



Chris Cross 



Fifteen 



*** 



"When He's Not a Stranger" (1989, Drama) 



Two Dads 



Bradymania: Very Brady 



I Witness Video g 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) g 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) g 



Townsend Television g 



Fifth Quarter Video 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



*V2 "The Stjper" (1991) Joe Pesci. R" g 



Lois & Clark: Adventures of Superman 



Seaquest DSV "To Be or Not to Be " g 



9:30 



Age-lnnoc. 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



♦* 



"Sexual Response" 0%2) R' 



How I Spent My Summer Vacation (R) g 



Murder, She Wrote (R) g 



Murder, She Wrote (R) g 



Martin g [Living Single 



[Larroquette [Wings (R)g 



"Sherlock Holmes Returns" (1993) Anthony Higgins. g 



'Sherlock Holmes Returns'' (^993) Anthony Higgins. g 



Married... 



Dearest 



Seaquest DSV "To Be or Not to Be " q 



*•'/; "SK/yesfe/- (1985) Richard Farnsworth. PG' 



NFL Primetime 



MacGyver "Cleo Rocks " g 



Were Talkin' Serious Money (1993) [: *'/2 'Ski Patrol' (1990) Roger Rose. "PG" 



**V2 "77?e Cutting £rfqe"(1992) D B. Sweeney. "PG" 



Double Dare [Legends [You Afraid? [Looney 



•** "Stolen Babies ' {"\99Z, Drama) Mary Tyler Moore. 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



Larroquette jWings (R) g 



•**V2 "'Brazil "{^985, Satire) Jonathan Pryce. (In Stereo 



Major League Baseball: Oakland Athletics at Baltimore Orioles. (Live! 



: ** "The Secret Passion of Robert Clayton" (1992) g 



: **• ■School r/es" (1992) Brendan Fraser PG-13" g 



Counterstrike "D.O.A " (R) 



Newsg 



News 



News 



Newsg 



Paid Prog. 



News 



11:30 



Real Sex 4 (R 



Cheers g 



Night Court 



12:00 



Roggin's 



Cur. Affair 



Star Search (In Stereo) 



Love Con. 



Paid Prog. 



Rescue 911 



Baywatch g 



Perspective 



Suspect 



Sportscenter 



Cleopatra Jones " ( 1 973) 



** 



*** 



■■Hook""{m\. Fantasy) Robin Williams. (In Stereo) PG' g 



"Ulterior Motives" {W2, Drama) R' 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) g 



Nick News Mork 



[Lucy Show [Van Dyke [M.T. Moore 



*•* "Claras Heart (1988, Drama) Whoopi Goldberg. 



NFL 



Hollywood 



** 



"Sunset Grill" {m2) 



***Vi "Terminator 2: Judgment Day " i^99^) R' q 
Donna Reed [ Dragnet [A. Hitchcock Superman 



Night Out 



Speciality Update 



Physicians 



MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 13, 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(2:30) 



4:30 



5:00 



1993 

"~r 



5:30 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 



■'Police Academy 5: Miami Beach^ 



Edition 



Oprah Winfrey g 



[Cheers g 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry 



Cops g 



Tiny Toon 



Cur. Affair 



(3 00) Sylvester" {\98b] 



Max Out (R) 



Ninja Turtles 



(2:30) 



(3:00) 



Muppets 



Dream Lg. 



Ninja Turtles 



News g 



Cheers g 



Design. W. 



Newsg 



News 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Murphy B. 



Animaniacs 



Newsg 



Batman g 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



** "/Arena "(1989) Paul Satterfield. 'PG-13' g 



Newsg 



News 



News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsg 



Full House g 



Newsg 



Roseanne g 



NBC News 



**'/; "fasf (^harlie - The h/loonbeam Rider' (1979) 



NFL Yrbk. 



Ninja Turtles 



Max Out 



Ninja Turtles 



Th'breds 



Ninja Turtles 



: **'2 "White Lightning' [Wi] Burt Reynolds. PG 



: **** 'T^e Charge ot the Light Brigade jmS) 
Crazy Kids j Hey Dude (R)| Guts 



Warm Hearts. Cold Feet (1987) Tim Matheson. 



What You Do 



Supermarket [Shop-Drop 



Up Close 



Ninja Turtles 



Hard Copy g 



Jeopardy! g 



Copsg 



CBS News 



Roseanne g 



Jeopardy! g 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



Am.Journal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



**'''2 "Point Break" {^99^, 



Day One g 



Drama) Patrick Sway ze R' 



Fresh Prince 



Shade 



Shade 



Blossom g 



Major Dad g 



Major Dad g 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



**V2 "White Sands'" (1992) R' g 



11:30 



12:00 



""Whispers in the Dark'Q 



NFL Football: San Francisco 49ers at Cleveland Browns. From Cleveland Stadium, g [News g 



**V; "Secrets {^992. Drama) Chnstopher Plummer. g 



Murphy B. 



Murphy B. 



Dave's 



Dave's 



Just One of the Girls " (1993, Comedy) Corey Haim. g 



Fresh Prince 



**';"' The Golden Seal " (1 983) " PG ' 



MacGyver g 



Blossom g 



Short Sub. 



Sportscenter |NFL Prime Monday 



1/We S'Sfe/- (1992) PG-13" 



: *'/; "Baby on Board" (1991) PG" 



Looney 



Looney 



Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Murder, She Wrote g 



Northern Exposure (R) g 



Northern Exposure (R) g 



Mama 



Mama 



: *»'/2 "Secz-efs" (1992, Drama) Christopher Plummer. g 



**'/2 "The Outsiders" {\982) Matt Dillon jShort Sut 



Beach Blowout 



*♦ 



WWF: Monday Night Raw 



"Class Act (1992) Christopher Reid. 'PG-13 g 



*♦ 



"Straight Talk (1992) Dolly Parton 



Bob Newhart Bob Newhart 



L.A. Law 



Bob Newhart 



Jump Roping 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) g 



News 



News 



Newsg 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Late Show (In Stereo) g 



Edition 



Chevy Chase Tom Selleck. 



Late Show g 



Love Con. 



News g [Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



*** 



"Bite the Bullet " jmS) "PG' 



Baseball [Sportscenter 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



*** 



♦♦ 



"City of Joy (^992) Patrick Swayze. •PG-13' g 



""Ulterior Motives 0992, Drama) R' 



Odd Couple 



'"K2 "(\992) 



Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart Bob Newhart 



** 



"The Worlds Oldest Living Bridesmaid' (1990) 



*'/2 "S?/-eefCffmes" (1992, Drama) R 



Bob Newhart Bob Newhart 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Bob Newhart 



Mysteries 







4:00 


4:30 5:00 1 5:30 


6:00 1 6:30 1 7:00 1 7:30 


8:00 1 8:30 [ 9:00 [ 9:30 [ 10:00 


10:30 11:00 1 11:30 


12:00 


2 


(3:00) 


: **"2 'The Outsiders ^^963) Matt Dillon 


: *♦ "The Karate Kid Part III (1989) Ralph Macchio.q 


: *** '"And the Band Played On "(1993, Drama) Matthew Modme □ 


: *♦ "Only Vou "(1992) Andrew McCarthy. 


Bill Hicks 


4 


Donahue (In Stereo) g 


Newsg 


Newsg 


Newsg 


ABC News 


Hard Copy g 


Ent Tonight 


Full House g 


Phenom g 


Roseanne g 


Coach g 


Other Epidemic -Cancer 


Newsg 


Cheers g 


Nightline g 


6 


Edition Cheers g 


Cheers g 


News 


News 


NBC News 


Jeopardy! g 


Wh. Fortune 


Saved-Bell 


Saved-Bell 


Larroquette 


Second Half 


Dateline (in Stereo) q 


News 


Tonight Show 


(In Stereol D 


7 


Oprah Winfrey g 


Design. W. 


Murphy B. 


News 


CBS News 


Copsg 


Married... 


Rescue 911 g 


; "Distant Cousms (1993, Drama) Mel Harris, g 


News 


Late Show (In Stereo) g 


8 


Les Brown 


Oprah Winfre 


f^ 


Newsq 


CBS News 


Am.Joumal 


Rescue 911 g 


: ■Distant Cousins {"^993. Drama) Mel Harris, g 


Newsg 


Edition Late Show g 


10 


Tom-Jerry 


Tiny Toon 


Animaniacs 


Batman g 


Full House g 


Roseanne g 


Roseanne g 


Married... 


Rocg 


Bakersfield 


America's Most Wanted q 


Mama [Mama 


Chevy Chase 


In Stereo) n Love Con. 


11 


Copsg 


Cur. Affair 


Newsg 


Newsg 


NBC News 


Jeopardy! g 


Wh. Fortune 


Saved-Bell 


Saved-Bell 


Larroquette Second Half 


Dateline (In Stereo) g 


News g [Tonight Show (In Stereo) qp 1 


14 


(3 00) Truly. Madly 


: **''2 "The Fortune ^^9^b) PG 


Short Sub. 


: **i'2 The American Success Company' 


1979) PG 


: ** "Tess of the Storm Country' {^960) Diane Baker. 


: ♦*V2 "Without a Trace 119831 "PG" 1 


17 


Max Out (R) 


Dream Lg. 


NFL Yrbk. 


Max Out 


NBA Today 


Up Close 


Sportscenter [Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) IMaior Leaaue RasAhalt Tpam. tn Rp AnnnunroH a ,.o\ 1 


18 


Pyramid 


Pyramid 


Parker Lewis 


Facts of Life 


Ninja Turtles 


Ninja Turtles 


MacGyver g 


Murder, She Wrote g Boxing: Bert Cooper vs. James Bone Crus 


her Smith. Quantum Leac 

' Sleeping Dogs Lie 0992) 1 


) (In Stereo) Odd Couple 1 


21 


(230) 


: "The Fearless Vampire Killers' 09S7] 


: *'2 "Poltergeist III {]98B] Tom Skerritt PG-13 g 


: *** "A Midnight Clear' (1992) Peter Berg. PG 


: ttV} When 


SonolDarkn" \ 


22 


(3 00) Promise at Dawn 


: ***'? Dead Poets Society' (1989 Drama) Robin Williams. "PG" q 


Chris Cross 


: *** "The Player {^992. Satire) Tim Robbins. R" g 


Altman 


Brett Butler 


: *** "American Me' (1992 Drama) R" 1 


25 


Muppets [Crazy Kids 


Hey Dude (R) Guts 


What You Do 


Looney 


Looney 


Bullwinkle 


Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart 


Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart 


Bob Newhart 


Bob Newhart 


Bob Newhart Bob Newhart 


Bob Newhart! 


26 


: ** Bridesmaids (1989, Drama) Shelley Hack 


Supermartcet 


Shop-Drop 


Unsolved Mysteries 


L.A. Law 


: ** "KiUer Instinct 0988, Drama) Melissa Gilbert 


Unsoh^ed Mysteries 


Mysteries 1 



WEDNESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 15. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



4:00 



4:30 



(315)** High Ice 0980) 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 



Edition 



Cheers : 



Oprah Winfrey l; 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry 



Cops: 



Tiny Toon 



Cur. Affair 



(3.30)*** 7"<n7 (1979) 



Max Out (R) 



Pyramid 



Dream Lg. 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



*»'/; Bebe s Kids 0992) "PQ02 g 



Newsg 



Cheers g 



Design. W. 



Newsg 



News 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Murphy B. 



Animaniacs [Batman g 



Newsg 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



"Fast Getaway 0991) 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Full House g 



Newsg 



Roseanne g 



NBC News 



There s No Business Like Show Business 09bA) 



Pyramid 



Yearbook 



Part(er Lewis 



Max Out 



Facts of Life 



(300) 



City Heal (1984 Comedy) Clint Eastwood PG g 



26 



♦'? 



Lobster Man From Mars (1989) 



Muppets jCrazyKids [Hey Dude (R) [Guts 



The Woman He Loved (1988) Jane Seymour 



Inside PGA 



Ninja Turtles 



Up Close 



Ninja Turtles 



Hard Copy g 



Corey Haim 



Jeopardy! g 



Copsg 



CBS News 



Roseanne g 



Jeopardy! g 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



Am.Joumal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



*♦'.> 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



*** 



The Untouchables (1987) Kevin Costner R 



Home Imp [Thea g 



Unsolved Mysteries g 



Larry 



Larry 



TaW Hopes g 



Tall Hopes g 



Beveriy Hrtls. 90210 g 



Unsolved Mysteries g 



Convicts Four (1963. Comedy) Ben Gazzara 



10:00 



Sanders 



Home Imp [Moon Over Miami Pilot g 



Now-T. Brokaw & K. Couric 



Ned Blessing: My Life 



Ned Blessing: My Life 



Melrose Ptace (In Stereo) g 



Now-T. Brokaw & K. Couric 



10:30 



Dream On g 



Coach (R) g 



Law a Order Sweeps g 



48 Hours: Armed-Pang 



48 Hours: Armed-Pang 



Mama 



I Mama 



Law A Order Sweeps g 



Sportscenter [Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live 



***''2 "T/iefloatftVa/T/o/- (1981) Mel Gibson R 



MacGyver The Challenge 



9 to 5 (1980. Comedy) Jane Fonda PG 



Perry Mason The Case of the Fatal Framing (1992) 



What You Do 



Suoermwket 



Looney 



Shoo-Droo 



Looney 



Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Myxteo** 



Murder, She Wrote g 



Baseball 



S/>a<(ma (1990. Horror) Christopher Atkins R 



Rubdown (1993. Drama) Jack Coleman (In Stereo) g 



**'2 The Cutting Edge 0992)0 B Sweeney PG 



Bob Newhart \Bcto Newhart 



I A I am HiclLji 



Bob Newhart [B<rt) Newhart 



11:00 



Crypt Tales 



Newsg 



News 



News 



Newsg 



11:30 



12:00 



Rapid Fire' 0992) 



Cheers g [Nightfine g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Late Show (In Stereo) g 



Edition 



Chevy Chase (In Stereo) g 



News! 



Late Show g 



Love Con. 



**'j 



[Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Sportscenter 



The Big Gamble" 0%1) 



*** 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) 



Foxworthy 



South Central 0992 Drama) R j: "Livin Large' 099^) R 



Bob Newhart 



Red Shoe 



Bob Newhart 



f 



Ch. Flag 



Odd Coulee 



Almost Pregnant (1992) R 



Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart Bob Newhart 



aiiiJllJSJIiiiLi!^^ i; i ri'u i-iWi mM i Wi Mfflfl' i ' i V i Wu , ■ i , ; i , , ; . ,, , , , 1 1 1 1 . i . . i r . : : : : " ■ 



The Clarion Call - 9-9-93- Page 11 





Young actor shares personal struggle 



by Suzanne Hildebrandt 
Features Writer 

Television and movie actor 
Corey Feldman was the first 
speaker in the Clarion University 
Activities Board lecture series 
for 1993-94. 

His presentation on September 
7th at 8:00 p.m. in the Marwick- 
Boyd Auditorium was titled 
"Alcohol and drug abuse: A 
personal struggle," which, as the 
title indicates, touched on the far 
too common problem of drug 
addiction. 

Of the 700 seats in the 
auditorium, 697 of them were 
reserved by university students 
alone. Many came just to have 
something to do or to see the 
"movie star" Corey Feldman, but 
they came out both entertained 
and, if not informed on new 
things, then at least reminded 
how bad addiction can really get. 
In words that anyone could 
relate to, Corey recounted his 
own struggles in life from his 
abusive home life and nightly 
attempts of suicide to his esc^)e 
into the fantasy wwld of acting. 
His escape, however, led to his 
capture into the imprisoning 
world of addiction. 
At 14, he was introduced to 
alcohol and marijuana in the 
town hosting the filming of 
"Stand By Me", and in a matter 
of only two years he had moved 
on to bigger and "better" drugs, 
known as cocaine and heroin. 



He went from hanging out with 
his Hollywood friends doing 
drugs in his Beverly Hills 
apartment, to hanging out on the 
streets of downtown Los 
Angeles making deals with 
ganglords to keep his $250 a day 
habit in supply. He managed to 
survive three more years of this 
slow suicide with drugs until 
finally getting arrested and 
waking up to a little bit of 
reality. 

When the media slammed his 
face all over every TV screen in 
America and brought his 
problems to public, Corey woke 
up to a little bit of reality, but not 
enough to quit drugs. Instead he 
entered into a rehabilitation 
program on the court's order, 
only to leave in 35 days-not 
much better off than when he 
began. 

Before his next arrest he met 
Vanessa Marcil who, after a 
romantic get-away to Las Vegas, 
became his new wife. Even with 
a family in the making, he 
continued his drug abuse, 
eventually resulting in another 
arrest and another rehabilitation 
program mandated by the court. 
This time he was out by the next 
day and arrested again facing 
federal penitention time if he 
didn't give the program a chance. 
In debt $150,000, his career at 
a stand-still and a marriage on 
the rocks, he finally made a 
decision to change. With a will 
to do things differently, Feldman 



stayed in the facilities for nine 
months, and this time facuig his 
past for the first time instead of 
hiding it in the dark comers of 
his mind. 

Feldman now has three years 
of sobriety behind him and has 
found a new purpose in life. For 
the past two years he has been 
lecturing for different 
organizations and schools and 
donating much of his time to 
various foundations. 

Feldman will "continue to do 
this for as long as there is a 
need," in order to fulfill what he 
calls his "role in the universe." 
"Addicts are not bad people 
trying to get good but sick 
people trying to get better and if 
I can help even one person then 
I've done my job." 

Feldman's first priority is 
spiritually driven now instead of 
confusion's desperation. He 
hopes that people can learn that 
ccxnmunication is the first step in 
the whole spectrum of 
prevention. 

"Addiction lies in the barriers 
we place within ourselves, and 
conmiunication allows us to not 
build up the pain within 
ourselves that creates the walls." 
For those that are already 
caught up in the "escape" of 
drugs Corey Feldman just warns, 
"Stop now; it only gets worse, it 
never gets better." 

Feldman's life is moving on in 
a positive direction now. 
Corey wrote and produced all of 




Katie Zaikoski/Clarion Calll 
Famous young actor Corey Feldman spills his emotions about his 
drug addiction struggles to large audience Tuesday night. 



the soundtrack of "Rock and Roll 
High School Forever," and has 
now formed his own music 
publishing company, 

Coreyography Music, and is in 
the process of starting his own 
publishing company, 

Coreyography Film. Soon to be 
released is National Lampoon's 



movie "Last Resort," which pairs 
up Feldman with his long time 
co-star Corey Haim, whom he 
could also be seen with in an 
upcoming TV series. Also in the 
makes is a kickboxing film "A 
Dangerous Place." Back on 
track and putting out some great 
stuff, Corey Feldman is 



Find your pot of gold at Pittsburgh's Irish Festival 



by Ron SantiUo 
Features Writer 



All are welcome to join in on 
the fun as the Pittsburgh Brewing 
Company brings "Halfway to St. 
Patrick's Day" to the I.C. Light 
Amphitheatre and tent. Station 
Square, September 10-12. 

Traditional and contemporary 
entertainment, Irish foods and 
refreshments, children's 
activities, Irish dance lessons, 
Irish musical intruments 
demonstrations and many other 
activities will highlight the 
weekend of Irish food, fun and 
customs. Those schedulded to 
appear and entertain include 
Dermot O'Brien, Cabal Dunne, 



Celtic Rocker Sean Fleming, 
Mary O'Dowd, Tip Splinter, Sean 
O'Neill and many more. 

Enter the I.C. Light 
Amphitheatre and tent and feel 
yourself being carried off to the 
Emerald Isles as the sweet 
aromas of Irish soda bread, thick 
hearty stew, and buttery new 
potatoes fill the air. While you 
stuff yourself with the delicious 
Irish foods, enjoy the sounds of 
traditional and contemporary 
minstrels and musicians playing 
Irish ballads and rousing 
folksongs. 

More highlights include 
Pittsburgh's Irish organizations, 
leprechauns, "pots of gold," 
shamrocks, shillelaghs, and a 



wealth of Irish customs. 

Children are also sure to enjoy 
themselves with a variety of 
Celtic entertainment, including 
sing-a-longs, Irish storytellers, 
performances and Irish musical 
instmments demonsuations. The 
Irish Dog Display tent will give 
the children a firsthand and up- 
close look at six different Irish 
dogs like the Irish Wolf Hound, 
Irish Setter, the Terrier, and 
more. 

The fun begins on Friday 4 
p.m.-midnight, Saturday 11 a.m.- 
midnight, and Sunday 9:30 a.m.- 
6 p.m. Highlighting Sunday's 
entertainment will be a Gaelic 
mass at 10 a.m. The mass will 
be led in the Gaelic language by 



Father Michael Cahill. 

Use your own "pot-of-gold" to 
take home a bit of Ireland when 
you visit the Irish marketplace. 
Authentic merchandise such as 
Aran knit sweaters, Irish sweets, 
tapes and CD's, books, 
monogrammed crystal, and little 
knick-knacks will be available 
for purchase from the nation's 
leading Irish impon stores. 

AdmissicHi is $5 for adults and 
$2.50 for children twelve and 
under. Children under three are 
admitted free. Admission is also 
free for the first hour of each day 
of the festival. 

Volunteers are also needed for a 
variety of jobs and shifts. 
Admission is free for all 









•I 'l V k\i?^ 



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volunteers and no experience is 
necessary. Those interested in 
volunteering are invited to a 
Volunteer Kick-Off party on 
Thursday, September 9 at 7 p.m. 
at Mullaney's Harp and Fiddle 
Irish Pub on 24th and Penn 
Avenue in the Strip District. 
Free refreshments will be served 
and all volunteers will have a 
chance to become more 
acquainted with each other and 
enjoy the company of old 
friends. 

For more information, 
schedule of events, future 
mailings or involvement, please 
contact Nan Krushinski at (412) 
422-5642 or (412) 422-6630. 






Page 12 - The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 



Simon says 'What's so funny about magic?' 



by Katie Zaikoski 
Features Writer 



Calching him on the rebound 
after his five day tour in 
Instanbul, Turkey, magician 
extraordinaire Sam Simon will 
dazzle the minds of his audience 
with his dynamic new illusions 
jmd comical one-man stage show 
on Saturday, September 11, at 8 
p.m. in the Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Rcx)m. 

The 60-minute performance 
will be the first time that Clarion 
University has been inu-oduced 
to the three spectacular illusions 
that Simon has inserted into his 
program. Saturday's show will 
consist of a combination of both 
the new illusions and his original 
one-man stage show that he is 
best noted for. 

Simon's wife and now business 
partner, Rhea, has been assisting 
Simon in the shows for over a 




public affairs photo 
UAB presents comic-magician Sam Simon this Saturday at 8 p.m. 



year, and will be featured in all 
three spellbinding illusions 
which she says "can be 
compared to David Copperfield- 
lype stunts." 

Rhea Simon says, " I will 
actually participate in the 
Twister, Houdinni's 

Metamorphosis and the Zig Zag 
illusions." She also added that 
during the Zig Zag illusion she 
will be pulled apart by her 
entertaining spouse. 

Simon has been in the art of 
magic for fifteen years and has 
presented his show to over 200 
colleges and universities since 
1986. Other areas that he has 
debuted in are Tampa, California 
and Paris. In addition to the 
performing business, the Simons 
operate the Concert and Event 
Productions which promotes and 
books headline entertainers. 
"We are looking to get 



involved with the music for 
upcoming Clarion University 
events this year," Rhea Simon 
adds. 

Simon is very big on audience 
participation and will be 
performing favorite tricks and 
acts such as the "restored 
newspaper," the "pom pom pull," 
and, of course, the three thrilling 
illusions thai look to provide an 
enjoyable evening for all who 
attend this performance. 

Sam Simon's show is free and 
everyone is welcome to attend. 
This Special Comic Event is 
sponsored by the Clarion 
University Activities Board, and 
is the special feature for 
Saturday's Family Day 



Recognitions to be awarded to outstanding individuals/groups 



by Amy Gerkin 
Features Editor 



With close to six thousand 
students roaming this campus, it 
is difficult for some students to 
be recognized when it is 
deserved. Therefore, beginning 
this month Student Senate will 
be implementing three kinds of 
monthly awards to those 



outstanding students, 

organizations, and organization 
advisors. 

According to the guidelines, in 
order to be awarded Clarion 
Students' Association Student of 
the Month, the recipient must be 
a full-time student with good 
academic standing (2.0 or 
above). The recipient must have 



displayed outstanding service 
and made positive contributions 
through involvement in campus 
activities during the month of 
recognition. 

The Organization of the Month 
goes to any Clarion Students' 
Association recognized or 
approved organization that must 
have displayed outstanding 



UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES BOARD 

PRESENTS 

MICHAEL KESSLER'S 

ERACISM 




MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 13TH 
GEMMELL MULTI-PURPOSE ROOM 

8 PM FREE! 

"IF 5% OF THE PEOPLE WORK FOR PEACE, 
PEACE WILL PREVAIL" ... ALBERT EINSTEIN 



service and made positive 
contributions to the university 
and/or the surrounding 
community during the month of 
recognition. 

Lastly, the Organization 
Advisor of the Month is given to 
any organization advisor of an 
approved or recognized Clarion 
Students' Association. Like the 
recipients of Student and 
Organization of the Month, the 
organization advisor must have 
displayed outstanding service 
and made positive contributions 
to the organizauon during the 
month of recognition. 

The intention of these awards 
is to distinguish those 
individuals and organizations 
with selection based on 
involvement in campus 
acuvities, positive contributions 
and service to Clarion 
University. The students, 
organizations, and organization 



advisors may be nominated by 
any member of the Clarion 
Students' Association, (x Clarion 
University's administration, 
faculty or staff. 

The recognition panel who will 
be evaluating the nominees 
consists of Dr. Diane Reinhartf.f 
President of Clarion University; 
Dr. George Curtis, Vice- 
President for Student Affairs; Dr. 
Colleen McAleer, Professor of 
Speech Pathology and 
Audiology; Mr. Hal Wassink, 
Coordinator of Student 
Activities; Michelle Sporer, 
Editor for The Clarion Call; and 
Gara Smith, President of Student 
Senate. 

Applications for these awards 
will be at the Student Senate 
office (269 Gemmell) and are 
due no later than the first day of 
the following month of 
recognition. The recipients of 
these awards will be announced 
in The Clarion Call each month. 



PREGNANT? 
NEED HELP? 

Free pregnancy test 
Coufidcnlial 
Counseling 



AAA PREGNANCY 
CENTER 

Vor appointment call: 
226-7007 

open Mon.-Wed.-Fri. 10-2 
Mon. 7-9 PM 



Student Body Week 

Sunday, September 12 
UAB presents: 

White Water Rafting 

at Ohio Pyle 
$15 includes: 
*2-way transportation 
*3-5 hour rafting trip 
*All-you-can-eat lunch 
SIGN UP NOW! 
Room 247 Gemmell 



1 

j 

1 
! 


i\ e 


\\ s 


by Chuck Shepherd 





f 



t' 




-In a June profile, The New 
York Times reported that New 
York City Sanitation 
Department's "artist-in- 
residence," Mierle Laderman 
Ukeles, has accomplished the 
following: built an archway 
made of gloves discarded by city 
employees and a structure made 
of piled steel shavings from 
subway car wheels; 
choreogr^^jhed a dance of street- 
sweeping machines; and 
conducted a performance art 
piece in which she shook hands 
with all 8,500 employees of the 
department. On the side, the 
self-described "maintenance 
artist" conducted a ballet of 
garbage barges in Pittsburgh. 

-Police in Gonzalez, Louisiana, 
arrested Garrick "Lucky" Lewis, 
20, in April on the complaint of 
a 21-year-old woman. The 
woman said Lewis broke into her 
apartment, lectured her about the 
need to lock her windows and 
doors, and left. A half-hour 

-U Mi,.. 



later, Lewis broke in again and 
allegedly tried to rape her 

-Former Hemet, California, 
high school quarterback A.T. 
Page, who had sex more than a 
hundred times with the wife of 
his coach, Randy Brown, in 
Brown's presence, said Brown 
called the adventures "astronaut 
training" and said they would 
make Page a better football 
player Said Page, "Just as (sex) 
would be going on with (Mrs. 
Brown), (the coach) would plug 
in a videotape of a scrimmage or 
a practice and say, 'Now this is 
what you're doing wrong, A.T.'" 
-In December, at the University 
of Colorado, three-hour final 
exams in French classes were 
cancelled halfway through when 
women's basketball coach Ceal 
Barry commandeered the gym 
where the exam was being held 
for a team practice. All 580 test 
takers received an A because of 
the inconvenience. 

-The Syracuse Herald-Journal 
reported in January that its 
telephone hotline, featuring 



excerpts of presidential debates 
last fall, was successful except 
for one glitch: Ross Perot's 
voice sometimes hit a pitch that 
mimicked a certain telephone 
tone that automatically shut 
down the system. 

-In July, Donald Wyman, 37, 
gained national notoriety when 
he rescued himself from 
underneath a fallen tree near 
Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, by 
amputating his own leg at the 
knee with a small pocket knife 
and then driving for help. A few 
days earlier, a 31 -year-old 
Tacoma, Washington man cut off 
his arm and nose with a bread 
knife because he was depressed. 
And the family of a 15-year-old 
boy in Elkton, Maryland, is 
suing the county board of 
education for $3 million because 
a dog stepped on the boy's groin 
before school one day, resulting 
in the need to amputate a testicle. 

-According to several news 
reports, the latest synthetic drug 
craze in some U.S. cities is 
methcathinone, or "Cat," which 



Welcome to the real world: Jeff 

Powell speaks 'Straight from the Hood' 



by Melissa Caraway 
Features Writer 



Tonight the Minority Student 
Services Speaker Committee of 
Clarion University will introduce 
student activist and poet Kevin 
Powell. The topic of Powell's 
lecture will be "Student 
Activism and Campus Racism." 

Although Powell has lectured 
at such prestigious universities 
as Princeton, New York and 
Rutgers, the New Jersey native is 
best known to this MTV 
generation as one of "seven 
strangers picked to live in a loft 
and have their lives taped" on 
MTV's docu-soap "The Real 
World." He was also the host 
and writer of the music channel's 
documentary "Straight From the 
Hood." 

Before lecturing at universities 
around the country on black 
male-female relationships, hip- 
hop culture and other topics 
affecting young black men, 
Powell was a student at Rutgers 
University. There the outspoken 
scholar acted as chair of the 
African Student Congress, leader 



of the 100 Black Men of Rutgers 
University and concentrated on 
speaking out against campus 
racism and tuition inaeases. He 
is also an advocate of 
multiculturalism on our 
counuy's campuses. Powell has 
also spent time as a social 
worker and a New York 
University English instructor. 

Powell's poetry and 
journalistic works have appeared 
in "Essence", "Emerge", and 
"Rolling Stone" magazines as 



well as being recognized by the 
African Poetry Theatre's Annual 
Poetry Contest and the 
Nuyorican Poets Cafe Grand 
Slam Contest for their 
powerfully honest and timely 
content. His first volume of 
poetry, entitled "don't feel no 
way," was published last spring. 
Kevin Powell's lecture, which 
will be held at 7:30 in the Hart 
Chapel, is free and all are 
welcome to attend. 



Poetry Contest 

$12,000 in prizes 

Each original poem entered in the North 
American Open Poetry Contest also has a 
chance to be published in deluxe anthology. 

Contest is free and open to everyone. Send one 
original poem of any subject and style to The National 
Library of Poetry, 11419 Cronridge Drive, P.O. Box 
704.ZI, Owings Mills, MD 21117. 

Deadline is September 30, 1993 (New contest Oct!) 



is manufactured with various 
industrial chemicals, including 
battery acid and Drano — thus 
requiring police to treat all 
manufacturing and sales sites 
they raid as toxic waste dumps. 
Symptoms of use include: 
sweating, quivering, shaking, 
experiencing long periods of 
stupor and paranoid 
hallucinations, and, said Wausau, 
Wisconsin sheriff's deputy Tom 
Kujawa, smelling bad. Said 
Kujawa, "The people who use it 
sunk." 

-The class president of third- 
year graduate students at Duke 
University Divinity School was 
expelled in April for a scheme in 
which, in words and deeds, he 
faked a case of terminal cancer, 
to the point of keeping his head 
shaved to mimic the effect of 
chemotherapy. 

-In January, a Dallas recording 
company mistakenly sent the 
wrong compact discs to about 
three dozen of the 1,000 radio 
stations that were to receive 
religious programming 

sponsored by the Southern 
Baptist Radio-TV Commission. 
Instead, the company had sent 
the alternative music band Dead 
Kennedys' album "Fresh Fruit 
for Rotting Vegetables," which 
includes the song "I Kill 
Children." 

-The Associated Press reported 



The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 - Page 13 

in April that the Red Belle 
Saloon in Salt Lake City is 
prospering under its new owners. 
Last year, bikers in a motorcycle 
gang called the Barons, whose 
clubhouse is near the bar, 
became angry at seeing the drug 
dealing, prostitution and violent 
crimes taking place at the bar, so 
they bought it, rehabilitated it 
and set the clientele straight. 

-In March in Port St. Lucie, 
Florida, four Christian pastors 
and two parishioners performed 
an exorcism of an oak tree just 
off Interstate 95. It has long 
been known in the community 
that two victims of a mass 
murderer were hanged from the 
tree in 1977, but things became 
more urgent recently when two 
kids reported being chased away 
from the tree by people in hoods 
shouting, "We want your blood." 
Instead of razing the tree, the 
property owner elected the 
exorcism and the erection of a 
cross nearby. 

-Seattle, Washington police 
arrested a 27-year-old man in 
April after he attempted to 
deposit a check into his account 
at a Washington Mutual Bank 
office. According to a teller, he 
is the same man who robbed the 
branch two days earher. 

-(C) 1993 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



Activities Day 

Sunday, Sept. 19, 1993 

Outside Gemmell Center 



Events include: 
*Book Center Sidewalk Sales 
*UAB Rock Concert with "The Clarks" & 

"Stinging Rain** 
^Organizational Exhibits & International 

Food Booths 
*UAB Drive-In Movie **Point of No Return" 



SPORTSMAN S COVE 

30% off all Fishing Gear 
with this ad. 




1\rchery Season is right around the 
corner. Get all of your supplies from 

Sportsman's Cove. 

Ammo Winchester - Federal 

Exit 9 off I '80, behind Perkins 

226 - 6272 



Page 14 -The Clarion Call- 9-9-93 



The Unlvefsity Book Center 

welcomes students 

T^ THIS FALL 
I'TEN PLUS BOOK CLUB" 

Just stop by and ask our cashiers how to get FREE trade books! 





•-MX ••UPS 

•-SPECIAL ORDERS •'POSTAGE STAMPS 

PRESUME PREPARATION *MONEY ORDERS (due Sept. 1) 

*GIFT CERTIFiaTES ^CUSTOM IPRINTING 

•-LAMINATING •'DELIVERY 

•-REPORT BINDING (balloons, flowers, care packages) 




Of^fl 



c 



\)ttys h 



% 



C; 

^ 



<>?> MONDAY ^*« 






THRU 

FRIDAY 

9AM - 4PM 

for 
FOLLETT COLLEGE BOOK CO. 

^ ^ S"" SPECIALS 

THROUGHOUT THE STORE! 
Shop the UBC, where your $$$ continue to work for you! 



Have dinner and a movie... 
in downtown Pittsburgh 



The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 - Page 15 



by Crystal Janis 
Features Writer 



Wanna catch a movie? Even 
with the Orpheum's newly 
remodeled neon glow, where else 
would be a cool environment to 
go see a movie? Were you 
thinking Pittsburgh? Good 
answer. The pink and blue neon 
on Main Street really doesn't 
come close in comparison to the 
numerous mystical lights shining 
from downtown Pittsburgh. 

You could take a roadtrip to 
this h^penin' city and watch a 
movie at Pittsburgh's Playhouse. 
With so many neat pubs, bar and 
grills, and restaurants all around 
the area, treating yourself to 
something tasty could also work 
into your trip. 

Here is a listing as to what will 
be playing at the Rockwell and 
Hamlet Street Theaters during 
the month of September "Much 
Ado About Nothing," starring 
Micheal Keaton, Kenneth 
Branagh, Emma Thompson, and 
Denzel Washington, is a rousing, 
wonderfully entertaining and 
funny film ver*sion of 
Shakespeare's play about people 
falling in love. This film runs 



until September 9. 

"Un Coeur En Hiver" (A Heart 
in Winter) is highlighted 
September 10-30. Starring 
Daniel Auteuil, Emmanuelle 
Beart, Maurice Garel, and Andre 
Dussollier, this film is about two 
men whose friendship is 
disrupted when they both fall for 
the same young, beautiful 
violinist. 

Also featured by the Playhouse 
Film repertory are favorites such 
as "The Lover" (Sept. 1), 
"Strictly Ballroom" (Sept. 3), 
"Dave" (Sept. 4), "Lost in 
Yonkers" (Sept. 10). "The 
Crying Game" (Sept. 11), 
"Malcolm X" (Sept. 17), 
"Othello" (Sept 20), and "Spike 
and Mikes All Sick and Twisted 
Festival of Animation" (Sept. 
24-30) which includes over 
eighteen underground animation 
hits including "Beevis and 
Butthead." 

So, grab some friends and 
jump into your car and enjoy the 
sites of Pittsburgh. Tickets range 
in price from $3-$5. For more 
information, location and film 
times, the Film Line can give 
you all the necessary details at 
621-6601. 



Civil Rights: Then and Now 



by Toni Ross 
Features Writer 



The issue of Civil Rights will 
be discussed in a lecture given 
by Julian Bond, a civil rights 
activist, politician, writer and 
teacher. The lecture, "Civil 
Rights: Then and Now," will be 
presented on Wednesday, 
September 15 at 7:30 p.m. in the 
multi-purpose room of the 
Gemmell Complex. 

Bond has dedicated his life to 
the struggle for equality in this 
counu^. He has taught at many 
universities and has received 14 
honorary degrees including 
Lincoln University. Bond also 
served on the Georgia State 



Senate and has been elected to 
public office more times than 
any black Georgian. 

Today, Bond is the host of 
"America's Black Forum," and 
has published many books on the 
subject of Civil Equality. He has 
also been a conmientator on the 
"Today" show and was the 
author of a nationally syndicated 
newspaper column called 
"Viewpoint." 

The lecture is part of the 
Clarion University Visiting 
Scholars Series and is free and 
open to the public. Following 
Bond's lecture, there will be a 
reception hosted by President 
Reinhard at Moore Hall. 



Super Tuesday 

$10 Student Haircuts 

(must have Student I.D.) 

mmmmmuf 



^y^ 



li 



'\ 



m\> 



^> 



^^^ 



A^ 






rvv>^*e.tf- 



V' 



Stand-up Booth 
& Tanning Beds 

Tanning Specials 

15 sessions for $35 

Must use within 3 months 



'Eracism* speaker celebrates loyalty to planet 



by John Martinec 
Features Writer 



Clarion University will play 
host to Eracismist, song writer 
and essayist Michael Kessler on 
September 13 at 8 p.m. in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. 

The basis of Kessler's work is 
called Eracism (AIR-uh-cism). 
Eracism is a word coined by 
Kessler and calls for loyalty to 
the planet that is equal to the 
loyalty one feels for their 
country. He also envisions the 
world on the verge of a new 
historical era which will begin 
with making a counuy out of the 
planet. 

Kessler has personally 
composed one hundred songs 
and sixty more in collaboration 
with others. The basic theme of 
his songs stress his desire for 
world peace. His music has been 
performed in the United States 




public affairs photo 
Eracism speaker Michael Kesssler signifles loyalty to our planet. 



The 'Fire' will be burning at Carnegie 



by Sherry Dickerson 
Features Writer 



Attention artists and art lovers! 
If you love art in any fcam, come 
witness Formed Bv Fire at the 
Carnegie Museum of Art in 
Pittsburgh before the fire goes 
out. 

Formed Bv Fire is a creative 
display of works by seven glass 
and metal artists that can be 
observed September 11 through 
November 7. For the anxious 
artists and art lovers, a special 
preview of the crafts will be on 
display Friday, September 10 
from 5-10 p.m. 

The exhibition Formed Bv Fire 
includes a select group of artists, 
such as Jonathan Bonner, 
Michele Oka Doner, Joey 
Kirkpatrick, Flora C. Mace, 
Dante Marioni, William Morris, 
and Albert Paley, who will 
expose their works of art. 

" Formed Bv Fire demonstrates 
the diversity of approaches 
among contemporary artists 
working in the traditional craft 
media of metal and glass," says 
Sarah Nichols, curator of 
antiquities, oriental and 
decorative jtffe,- 

"For these artists, technical 
mastery of glass aiid metal is 
merely the starting point for their 
own creative and personal 
exploration of the media. They 
have chosen media that excites 
and inspires them," Nichols 
adds. 

Catch a glimpse of the 
transformation of raw glass and 
metal changing into creative art 



formations with the use of fire. 
This spectacle will include 
various processes such as 
forging, hand forming, casting 
and blowing, which results in 
brilliant colors, a sense of 
motion and an awe-inspiring 
scale. " ' 

In Formed Bv Fire, these 
contemporary artists will 
demonstrate different approaches 
of transforming glass and metal 
into their own decorative arts. 
This art diversity. Formed Bv 
Fire, can be viewed in the Forum 
Gallery and the Hall of Sculpture 
at the C^amegie Museum of Art. 
Tours of the displays will be 
available. For tour information, 
call (412) 622-3218. 



Formed Bv Fire is part of a 
nation-wide commemoration of 
"The Year of American Craft: A 
Celebration of the Creative Work 
of the Hand." In cooperation 
with Formed Bv Fire, a city- 
wide celebration that will be held 
by the Pittsburgh Craft 
Consortium begins on September 
10 in fifteen areas throughout the 
city. 

Also, as a part of the 
observance, the Carnegie 
Museum of Art will hold its 
annual decorative arts 
symposium on October 25. 
Many presentations are planned 
for this annual symposium. For 
more information concerning the 
symposium, call (412) 622-3208. 



WELCOME BACK! 
rCotvers 'n Boivs 

625 Wood St. 
226-7171 

20% OFF 

any fresh flower sale of $10,00 or more 
(*Excludes wire orders) 

WE DELIVER 

Expires: 9/30/93 



and in the former Soviet Union 
with his group, "The Working 
Class" who performed on 
national Soviet television for an 
audience of 100 million. 

Michael Kessler spreads his 
message of world peace and the 
creating of a constitutional, 
global society in other ways 
besides music. He is a globally 
published essayist. He is also a 
public speaker who presents his 
work via a slide/lecture program 
called the "Einstein Express." 
Kessler has been the guest of 
many television and radio shows 
both here in the United States 
and in the U.S.S.R., and hosted 
his own television series called 
"Archimedes* Lever." 

Kessler also co-delivered a 
presentation to the USSR 
Academy of Sciences and a 
follow-up article. 

Leaving his teaching career in 
1977, Louisville, Kentucky 

T 



native Kessler decided to reach 
out to a planetary audience with 
the opportunities promised in 
this new knowledge. He now 
has the ear of people like R. 
Buckminster Fuller, Harry 
Chapin, John Denver, Carl 
Sagen, and Muhanmied Ali. 

Kessler's quest can be 
summarized when he says "Once 
the average citizens of the world 
have a working understanding of 
this new information and the 
awesome possibilities it offers, 
the call for a global society of 
peace and prosperity will be 
made." 

Admission to this University 
Activities Arts Series 
presentation is free and everyone 
is welcome to attend and enjoy, 
as well as learn how to be more 
loyal to the preservation of the 
Earth, our only home. 





Eaa [JimiaigEa 





f-. J 




COMIC 

BOOKS 

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15 South 6th Ave. 

(Across from Capt. Loomis) 

227-2544 

Mon-Sat: 12-5:30 
Fri: 12-7:00 

(open earlier by chance) 



"' TM DC Comics © 1993. AM Rights Reserved. 



Page 16 - The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 



The Clarion Call ■ 9-9-93 - Page 17 



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THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 



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BY GARRY TRUDEAU 



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Early but unsuccessful practical jokes 



ANSWERS 




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Calvin and Hobbes 



by Bill Watterson THE FAR SIPE 



By GARY LARSON 







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MOU FOCUS 

ON READING 

THE FIRST 

SECTION? 



I ASK 
M><SELE, 
"Do I EVEN 
CARE?" 




THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
1 Cost 
6 Snakes 
lORuss. sea 

14 Poe's bird 

15 Persian title 

16 — Lisa 

1 7 Happening 

18 In one's right 
mind 

19 Uncles wife 

20 Bothered 
22 Girl 

24 Lab animal 

25 Join together 

26 High regard 

30 Russ. mountain 
range 

31 Erect 

32 Giving to telling 
tales 

37 Notice of debt 

38 — Park, Colo. 

39 Family member 

40 Ocean liner 

42 Liquid measure 

43 Words of 
understanding 

44 Impede 

45 Deeply affected 

49 Arthur of TV 

50 Pres — G 
Harding 

51 Land facing 
street 

56 Celebes ox 

57 Solicitude 

59 Certain 
fisherman 

60 Give money to 
use 

61 Gen Rot>ert — 

62 Subterfuges 

63 Existence 

64 Plant producer 

65 Boutique 



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i 1993 Tribune Media Services inc 
All Rights Reservefl 



DOWN 

1 Kind of school 

2 Fine review 

3 Singer Burl 

4 Small value coin 

5 Went in 

6 Item of value 

7 Food fish 

8 Peter — 

9 Defeats soundly 

10 Accumulate 

1 1 Awaken roughly 

12 — Oakley 

13 Not now 



21 Sheep 

23 — lang syne 

25 Move slowly 

26 Abates 

27 Man's attire 

28 Floor cover 

29 A Fitzgerald 

30 Loosen 

32 Pale 

33 ^eave out 

34 Cheerio 

35 Part of USA: 
abbr 

36 Fat 

38 Perfumes 
41 Small amount 



42 Horseshoe 
throws 

44 Vintage car 

45 Low marshy 
land 

46 Neck adornment 
of horses 

47 Golf clubs 

48 Swap 

49 Kind 

51 Gratis 

52 German; abbr 

53 Too 

54 Actor Will — 

55 Gaelic 
58 Beer 

relative 



"You're in luck! This place just came on the market 

a few days ago. ... The previous owners all had 

their heads chopped off." 



Page 18 - The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 



A MONUMENTAL BOOK SALE 
OF HISTORIC PROPORTIONS. 



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THOUSANDS OF BOOKS 
$5 AND UNDER 



Never before has there been such a king-size book sale. Gigantic 
selection of over 50,000 books up to 85% off original publisher's price. 
Voluminous variety of popular publishers, authors, and titles. Stupendous 
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NOW IN THE BOOKSTORE! 

SEnEMBER 9TH • KTOBER Tin 

Bookstore Hours: Monday - Friday8:30 AM - 4:30 PM , Saturday 1 2:00 PM • 3:00 PM 





The Clarion Call ■ 9-9-93 - Page 19 




West 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 



If a title were placed on the 
Clarion football story of 1992, it 
would most likely read "A Tale 
of Two Seasons." After a dismal 
0-4 start, the Golden Eagles 
rallied for six straight wins, 
including a 35-26 thriller over 
lUP to capture the PSAC-West 
championship. Last season's 
magical conclusion coupled with 
the fact that the nucleus of the 
'92 squad still remains, has 
Clarion seeking "Great 
Expectations" for the year to 
follow. 

The Eagles certainly did not 
appear headed for a 
championship at season's start. 
The Eagles' defense surrendered 
48 points in each of their first 
two games, and early signs 
indicated that they were easier to 
run against than Michael 
Dukakis. Two more setbacks 
had the Eagles wallowing at 0-4, 
but before Cathy Ireland would 
have a shot to become the team's 
kicker. Clarion began showing 
signs of brilliance, both on 
offense and on defense. 

A 42-14 pounding of Lock 
Haven was wedged in between 
three point wins at Bloomsburg 
and at Shipp. A hard-fought 23- 
18 victory vs. Cal in blizzard- 
like conditions placed the Eagles 
at 4-4, 4-1 in the PS AC, and set 
up a surprisingly meaningful 
showdown with third place 
Slippery Rock. 

In a game that featured more 
offense than Howard Stem, the 
Eagles exploded for 34 second 
half points and earned a 
showdown with perennial 
powerhouse lUP for the PS AC 
Western Division Championship. 

Trailing the Indians late in 
quarter number four, the Clarion 
offense rallied for two 
touchdowns and claimed their 
first PSAC-West crown in nine 
years. As the final seconds 
ticked away, and hundreds of 
fans poured onto the field, 
Clarion linebacker Frank 
Andrews bellowed the prophetic 
phrase, "There's a new team in 
town!" 

That "new team in town" is 
ranked 19th in the country for 
Division II according to College 
Football Review, and have yet 
another brutal schedule to 




File Photo 
Headed in the right direction: Eldrldge Ponder (2) and the Golden Eagle defense improved 
every game In '93, and over the final six weeks, allowed only 57.2 rushing yards per game, 
intercepted 12 passes, and forced 25 fumbles. 

withstand in 1993. Last year the newcomer Craig Ray. Zak was 9 

of 24 for 107 yards before 



Eagles played the toughest 
schedule in all of Division II. 
Eagle opponents had a winning 
percentage of 60.7%, and the 
combined record of the teams 
that handed Clarion its first four 
losses was 36-2-2. The task is 
no easier this year as five of the 
ten Eagle opponents are 
nationally ranked. 

Head coach Gene Sobolewski 
enters his 11th season as skipper 
of the Eagles and brings with 
him a career mark of 55-46. 
"Being the defending 
champions, we know everyone 
will be gunning for us," 
Sobolewski explained, "Our 
number one priority is to build 
on 1992, not live on its laurels." 

The 1993 squad will return 15 
starters and 32 lettermen from 
last year's title team, including 
five pre-season All-America 
selections. 

On offense, where the Eagles 
averaged over 400 yards per 
game one year ago, a battle for 
the starting quarterback position 
has been waged between 
incumbent Chris Zak and 



suffering a season-ending injury 
in the second game of the year, 
while Ray, a tfansfer from New 
Haven, is having a magnificent 
camp. 

The Clarion backfield consists 
of four letterwinners, and 
tailbacks Damien Henry, Art 
Gregory and Steve Witte will 
each get their share of work in 
'93. Henry rushed for 396 yards 
and scored tlve times last year, 
but nagging injuries have been 
known to reduce his 
effectiveness. Gregory, a hard- 
nosed runner and blcKker, may 
move to fullback to accompany 
Tom Lumadue and Chad 
Speakman at that position. Witte 
scored a touchdown on his first 
collegiate carry and is having an 
impressive pre-season. 

The receiving corps may be 
the best in Division II. Senior 
tight end Tim Brown caught 60 
balls last year for 614 yards and 
four touchdowns. Both Brown 
and junior wideout Marlon 
Worthy are pre-season, first team 
All-America selections going 



into '93. Worthy caught 32 
bombs for 607 yards seven 
touchdowns, while returning 21 
punts for 254 yards and one 
score. Jess Quinn and Kevin 
Harper round out the vertically 
challenged but explosive wide 
receiver unit of the Eagles. 
Senior tight end Ryan Alleman 
will also see plenty of time in 
the Clarion offensive line-up. 

The "O" line features three 
returners including second team 
PSAC-West selection Leonard 
Kirby. Kirby earned that honor 
as a guard but will move to right 
tackle in '93. Sophomore 
center John Smith, guard Ed 
Gillespie and freshman guard 
sensation Chris Martin appear to 
be the odds on favorites to start, 
while Jason Fazekas and Derek 
MacKay will battle for the final 
line spot. Red-shirt freshmen 
Joe Lemley and Chris Kiker 
have had good camps and are 
more than ready to fill in when 
necessary. The starting line will 
average nearly 6' 2" and 267 
pounds. 

The defensive unit rebounded 
from a rocky start in '92, and in 



the last six contests, it allowed 
an average of just 57.2 rushing 
yards per game. 

Up front, the Fagles expect a 
big year from senior Eric Acord. 
Acord has compiled 119 tackles 
and six sacks in the last two 
seasons. Brent Lehmann, Chris 
Coleman, Gary Fallings, and Ed 
Mariano, fresh off his Hill Street 
Blues project, will spend time 
grueling in the U-enches. 

The linebacking trio is a who's 
who of All-America's. Damon 
Mazoff has led the "D" in tackles 
the last two seasons with a 
combined 330: Frank Andrews 
collected 103 sticks and nine 
sacks last year; and Clint Terza, 
who quietly blasted 114 ball 
carriers and recorded four sacks. 

Clarion's defensive secondary 
plans to deliver even more 
punishment than it did in 1992, if 
that is possible Free safety Sean 
Spencer, who makes Ronnie Lott 
look like Pee Wee Herman, may 
be the hardest hitter in Division 
II. At the corners, Eldridge 
Ponder, who thwarted 11 passes 
in '92, and makes up ground 
faster than the Atlanta Braves, 
and Ric Giles, who recorded 34 
tackles in limited playing time, 
return for the Eagles. Pat Span, 
Damon Bratton, Dan Veney and 
Shawn Kimple round out the 
talented pool of defensive backs. 

Paul Cramer returns for the 
kicking chores, and Rich 
Ruperto will do the punting. 

The season opener is Saturday, 
Sept. 11 against defending 
PSAC-East champion West 
Chester. Kickoff at Clarion's 
Memorial Stadium is set for 2 
PM. 

1993 

Schedule 



9/11 West Chester 2:00 

9/18 New Haven 1:30 
9/25 Westminster 1:30 
10/2 Edinboro 1:00 

10/9 Bloomsburg * 2:00 
10/16 Lock Haven 1:30 
10/23 Shippensburg 1:00 
10/30 California 1:00 

11/6 Slippery Rock 1:00 
11/13 Indiana 1:30 

Home games are in bold. 
* Homecoming 



Pa^e 20 - riif Clarion Call - 9-9-93 



The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 - Page 21 



Eagles land big name recruits 



hy Ihn Vessa 
Sports I'^ditor 



Men's Basketball 

Head coach Ron Rijjhicr ami 
his coachinj! stall have added 
lour dynamic players lo their 
l')')3 roster in an attempt to 
improve their 17-0 record ol a 
yeiir ajzo. "It's a well balanced 
group that come from highly 
successful programs," 

commented Righter. "We 
wanted to gel some quality 
freshmen this yciir to establish a 
foundation for our future, 
especially since we have six 
seniors returning in 1993-94" 

One of those quality freshmen 
is guard Orronn Brown. Brown, 
a talented 6' 2", 175-p()und point 
or sh{X)ting guard, averaged 18.5 
points, eight rebounds, five 
assists and four steals per 
contest. Brown was a second 
tcjun All-Public League and first 
tcimn All-Brooklyn .selection for 

New Utrecht High, and was 
considered the 27th best player 
in New York City by "Hoop 
Scoop" magazine. "Orronn is a 
future star in the PS AC", 
Righter said, "An extremely 
athletic player, Orronn does 
everything well and will follow 
in the footsteps of another 
Brooklyn player here, Kwame 
Morton." 

Ciuard Jamie Polak comes to 
Clarion after an exceptional 
senior season at Steel Valley 
High School. A first team 
WPIAL selection and Section 10 
MVP choice, Polak averaged 
23.5 ppg, 7.2 rpg and 6.5 assists 
per game. "Jamie should 
provide excellent depth to our 
backcourt," explained Righter. 
"A quality scorer, he also 
pos.sesses excellent passing skills 
and will be a very good future 
player in the PSAC." 



The 1 -Ragles added some size to 
their front court as well by 
recruiting 6'7" Scott Cronk. 
Cronk, who averaged 12 points 
and 1 1 hoards per game lor 
McDowell High School in lirie, 
led his team to the Metro League 
title iuid a second place finish in 
District 10. "Scott is a solid, 
lundiunentiilly sound player who 
has a bright future at Clarion," 
noted Righter. "We expect lo 
red-shirt Scott this sea.son and 
use the year to build overall 
strength. He's a hard worker and 
we l(X)k forward to having him 
in our program." 

Bill Chwalik is a 6'7", 220- 
pound forward from I'armington 
Hills, Michigan. Chwalik, a 
junior college transfer out of 
McComb Community College, 
was not signed by the Hagles 
until August 18. "He should be 
able to help us right away," 
Slated Clarion assistant coach Al 
Modrejewski, "He's a strong, 
aggressive player in the mold of 
a Mark McCarthy." 

Women's squad improves 

Clarion's 1992-93 women's 
basketball team posted a 24-6 
record last year and advanced to 
the round of sixteen in the 
NCAA playoffs. In the off- 
season, head coach Margaret 
"die" Parsons and her staff made 
great strides in solidifying their 
stay at the lop. 

April Thompson, a 5' 11" 
center from Beaver Falls scored 
856 career points and gathered 
757 rebounds while being named 
MVPof her section. 

Joy Brown, a 5'9" 
guard/forward from Warren 
Western Reserve in Warren, 
Ohio, was injured for her .senior 
year, but still accumulated 776 
points, 421 rebounds and 231 
assists for her career. 



Janette Bol/.e a 5 '9" 
guard/forward from West Perry 
High, was a three year starter 
and averaged 15.3 points her 
senior year. 

Tina Skelley and Wendy 
Lechner are both from the 
Altoona teiun that posted a 25-5 
record and advanced to the 
western final before losing to 
Oakland Catholic. Skelley 
averaged 3.2 ppg and Lechner 
averaged close to six per contest. 
"We're really excited about 
these five ladies who will be an 
integral part of our 1993-94 
season," Parsons explained. 
"We're looking forward to their 
contributions." 

Wrestling team adds bulk 

Jack Davis enters his second 
year as Clarion's he^d wrestling 
coach hoping to improve the 9- 
13-1 mark of last season. "We 
are very pleased with our 
signings for the 1993-94 
season," Davis said. The 
signings include two PIAA state 
champions, a runner-up, a fourth 
place finisher, and a pair of two- 
lime PIAA qualifiers. 

Bob Crawford, a 125-pounder 
from Millon High School, was 
ranked number one in the nation 
at 125 pounds by Amateur 
Wrestling News. A four-fime 
PIAA Champion, Crawford had 
a career record of 138-2, and 
became only the eighth wrestler 
in PIAA history to win four state 
crowns. Oh, by the way, he 
graduated in the top five percent 
of his class. 

Tom Tomeo, a 130-pounder 
from Grove City High School, 
finished 1992 ranked number 
two in the nation by Amateur 
Wrestling News al 130-pounds. 
A two-lime PIAA Champion, 
Tomeo finished with a career 
record of 143-8 and won his 



SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY 



Captain Loomis Inn Building 

540 Main Street 
Clarion, Pa 16214 

(814)226-8400 



Mr. T's Six Pack Shop 



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Fri. & Sat. 



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Mr. T'S 
Niteclub 

Monday 

through 

Sunday 

11am-2am 




Joey Payne/ Clarion Call 
Clarion basketball recuits (from left to right), Orronn 
Brown, Scott Cronk, Bill Chwalik, and Jamie Polak. 



final 79 matches. His greatest 
moment may have been his 
victory over University of Iowa 
recruit Jeff McGinness. 
McGinness came into the match 
as the number one ranked 
wrestler in the country and 
sporting a career record of 172-0 
before bowing to Tomeo 6-4 in 
overtime. Tomeo also graduated 
in the top five percent of his 
class. 

Charley Carbaugh, a 135- 
pounder, bad a (swecr record of 



100-29 and was a two-time 
District 10 champion. 

Joe Stofko, a transfer from 
Drake University, is projected at 
150 pounds. He was 15-10 at 
Drake last year and placed fourth 
at PlAA's when attending 
Catasauqua High. 

Chris Bugosh, projected at 150 
pounds, had a mark of 19-9 at 
Mount Pleasant High, and Matt 
Pemeskey posted a 23-4 record 
at 135 pounds for DuBois High. 



Clarion vs. West Chester on Sat. 



by B. Vessa 
Sports Editor 



In a game that probably should 
have been played last year, the 
PS AC- West champion Clarion 
Golden Eagles will face the 
PSAC-East champion West 
Chester Rams at Memorial 
Stadium on Saturday. 

West Chester went 9-2 a year 
ago and last week played New 
Haven, the team that knocked 
them from the playoffs last 
season. After leading 20-17 at 
the half, the Rams defense could 
not contain the potent New 
1 laven offense, and West Chester 
fell 45-.11 

The Rams possess an explosive 
offense that averaged 428 yards 
and 29.4 points per game last 
year. Junior quarterback Dave 



MacDonald, who hit on 20 of 
47 for 362 yards on Saturday, 
was the PSAC-East "Player of 
the Year" last season. 

MacDonald will look for 
PSAC-East "Rookie of the 
Year" Jarmin Culbreth, who 
grabbed 48 passes for 671 
yards last year, and Rich Neel, 
who took home the "PSAC- 
East "Player of the Week" 
award with a 10 reception, 222 
yard day against New Haven 
last week. 

The Rams can run the ball as 
well. Scott Eberiy and Shawn 
Little gained 722 and 656 yards 
respectively last year. 

The Rams' defense is 
anchored by All-American 
linebacker Lee Woodall. 

Kickoff is set for 2 PM on 
Saturday. 



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Excellence is synonymous with Clarion tennis 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 



In the last seven years, the 
Clarion University tennis team 
has compiled an absurd 85-6 
dual meet record, by far the best 
in the East. However, 1993 may 
turn out to be a year of 
transition, as the Lady Eagles 
welcome seven newcomers to 
their outstanding program. 

Head Coach Terry Acker, who 
begins his fourth season as the 
Eagle's chief, has banged out a 
28-5 career slate. "We're 
expecting a solid season from 
our four returning veterans," 
Acker said, "but we also have 
seven first year players who will 
be using the dual meet season to 
mature into the collegiate game." 

Leading the way for the Eagles 
in 1993 will be four-year starter 
Shara Wolkimir. Wolkimir, last 
season's number one singles 
player, finished the year with a 
7-5 singles record and a doubles 
ledger of 10-4. "Shara is 
technically the best hitter on the 
team and is in the best shape of 
her life." Acker explained, 
"Mentally, she is one of the 
toughest individuals I've ever 
coached." 



Roxann Milton, a three-year 
letterwinner, compiled a 5-4 
singles record and a 5-2 doubles 
mark in '93. Milton has a career 
record of 19-9 in singles 
competition. "Roxann is 
probably our most consistent 
player as well as being one of 
our best conditioned athletes," 
Acker said. Milton and 
Wolkimir will share duties as co- 
captains for 1993. 

Melodi Dess will challenge 
Milton for the number two 
singles spot this year. Dess had 
a superlative freshman campaign 
compiling an 8-5 singles record 
as well as 8-5 doubles slate. 
"Melodi's pure athletic ability 
alone will keep her in matches," 
quothed Acker. 

Six newcomers will inherit a 
significant responsibility on this 
season's squad including Kirsten 
McKinley from Baldwin, 
Morgan Mulvahill of Mt. 
Lebanon, Kim Turowski from 
Highlands, Stephanie Pond from 
Mechanicsburg and Sarah 
Unkefer out of Marlington, 
Ohio. 

The Clarion University tennis 
team opens its season today 
(Thursday) at Westminster and 



then travels to Geneva on 
Saturday before returning home 
to face Gannon on Sunday, 
September 12. Sunday's match 
will take place at the Campbell 
'lall courts starting at 1 PM. 




1993 Tennis 
Schedule 



Sept 9 
Sept 11 
Sept 12 
Sept 17 
Sept 18 
Sept 20 
Sept 22 
Sept 26 
Sept 29 
Sept 30 
Oct 9 
Oct 14 



at Westminster 
at Geneva 
GANNON 
at California 
at Mercyhurst 1 
PITTSBURGH 
SLIPPERY ROCK 
at Shippensburg 
at Edinboro 
at Indiana 
BLOOMSBURG 
16* PSAC'S 



3:00 
1:00 
1:00 
3:30 
2:00 
3:30 

3:30 
3:30 
3:00 
3:00 
3 : 



File Photo 
Senior Roxann Milton is 
hoping to better her 5-4 
singles record of last year. 



at Allentown 



Kelly and Condo lead the way for new look Eagles 



by Debbie Adams 
Sports Writer 



With juniors Meghan Kelly 
and Gerri Condo leading the 
team, the 1993 Clarion Women's 
Volleyball team should start right 
where they left off in '92. 

Kelly and Condo were named 
co-captains for the team that won 
13 of its last 19 games and 
finished the year with an 
impressive 24-15 record. 



Kelly, a defensive specialist, 
was second on the squad in digs 
and third in service aces last 
year. 

Condo, primarily used as an 
outside hitter, is a leader by 
example according to fourth-year 
head coach Sue Flaherty. "Gerri 
is a hard worker with a great 
attitude," said Flaherty. "She will 
have her best season in 1993." 
Other returning players 



Due Dates for Intramural Rosters 

Flag Football 

Tuesday. Sept. 21. 3:00 PM 

Men's, Women's and Co-Ed 
Volleuball 

Friday, Sept. 24. 3:00 PM 

Co-ed Soccer 

Friday, Sept. 24. 3:00 PM 



looking to better their 1992 
numbers are sophomores Bobbi 
Simpson, Jennifer Betters and 
Nicole Flambard. "Bobbie, 
Jennifer and Nicole will be 
leaders in the starting lineup," 
stated Flaherty. 

Two freshmen are expected to 
vault into the starting lineup in 
1993, Lisa Flynn and Kathleen 
Rhodes. 

Flynn, an All-State selection 
from Norwin High, will be a left 
side hitter for the Eagles. 

Rhodes, a setter , was captain 
and Most Valuable Player of 
Freemont Ross High School. 

Other newcomers include 
outside hitter Michelle Graham, 
middle/outside hitter Kelly 
Kolarich, left-side hitter Lisa 
Pusztay, setter and defensive 
specialist Beth Tress, outside 
hitter Melissa Brooks, and 
defensive specialist Dawn 
Fredick. 

The Eagles began their season 
on Friday at the Fairmont State 
Tournament. The Eagles 
finished the two-day event with a 
2-3 record. They were 2-2 on 
Friday, beating Point Park and 
lUP and losing to William Jesuit 
and Fairmont State. 



In Saturday's semi-finals. 
Clarion was defeated by 
Charleston in five games, 15-13 
in the last one. Bobbi Simpson 
had 25 kills and Lisa Flynn 
added 18 in Saturday's loss. 
Kathleen Rhodes recorded 53 set 
assists in the finale. 

The Eagles will next be in 
action at the Wayne State 



Tournament Friday and Saturday 
before their PSAC schedule 
kicks off at Edinboro on 
Tuesday. 

The Eagles first home match 
will be next Thursday, 
September 16, against Robert 
Morris. First serve is set for 
7:30. 



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Students 



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while you serve your career. 

USAF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 

TOLL FREE 

1-800-423-USAF 



Page 22 - The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 



Svorts Opinion: 

If Montana keeps this up, they might just name a state after him 



by Judy Males 
SpurLs writer 



I'iniUiy! Pigskin season is here. 
Alter an eternal summer of 
Basebrawl, its lime to turn our 
utmost attention to a sport where 
hitting and clubbing is a must. 
Ah, yes. lliat frosty bite in the 
air combined with that colorful 
foliage makes a traditional 
setting for what I think is 
America's national past time. 

As the 74th season of the 
National l-ootball League begins, 
the AI'C is still seeking a Super 
Bowl title after Buffalo got 
shellacked by Doomsday 
Defense II 52-17. How could 
you forget? It was just another 
Super Bowl where the game was 
over at the half! I've got this 
burning feeling in my innards 
that has me thinking the AFC 
will reign supreme this year. 

Maybe a ring for Joe 
Montana's thumb or an MVP 
named Seau. Or how about the 
blast furnace or Shula's Fish or 
maybe even a Moon over the 
AFC is due. 

The NFC continues to shower 
the best teams in the league. 
Dallas, San Francisco and 
Washington along with up and 
coming Green Bay and 
Minnesota are all favorites to go 
to the show in late January. 

But all of a sudden, the league 
sticks a crowbar in the spokes of 
the NFC machine. Free Agency. 
With so many players changing 



teams, it will be extremely 
difficult for a team to stay in the 
playoffs year after year. You 
definitely need a program to 
know who's where this year! 

Besides Free Agency, there 
were some big name trades that 
got the sports world stirring. 
Probably the biggest being Joe 
Montana to Kansas City. 
Ringgold, Pennsylvania's most 
famous athlete is hoping to pick 
up that mythical fifth Superbowl 
ring, and, after a impressive 
opening day win against the 
Buccaneers, Montana might be 
the missing piece in the Chiefs 
championship puzzle. 

Another big quarterback swap 
was Boomer Esiason from Cincy 
to the Jets. Boomer returns to 
his roots in New York under 
good friend and former coach 
Bruce Coslet. The Jets were also 
able to pick up All-Pro hitter 
Ronnie Lott. Lott takes his four 
rings to the Meadowlands in 
hopes of adding a fifth, but must 
work with a young, 
inexperienced defense that has a 
lot to prove. 

After "team shopping" all 
spring, sack-man Reggie White 
ends up in Titletown, USA. The 
pro-bowl defensive end hopes to 
become another legend in Green 
Bay Packer history. Yeah. I can 
see it: Lombardi, Nitchke, Starr, 
White. It fits. 

Jeff Hosteller left the NY 
Giants and headed west to the 



Silver and Black of the Raiders. 
Al Davis saw a need for a good 
quarterback and got it with 
Superbowl XXV champion 
Hosteller OK, I could write a 
book on this year's player 
moves-but what's the sense? By 
Mid-December you'll know 
them all anyhow-thai is, if you 
even care! 

I'm not one to predict, or 
should I say, predict correctly, 
but why not? Everyone else 
does. After analyzing week one's 
NFL action, I do see some 
definite Superbowl possibilities. 
In the AFC, teams like Miami, 
Houston, San Diego and 
Pittsburgh should make Paul's 
Post Season Party. In the NFC, I 
like Detroit, Washington, San 
Francisco and New Orleans. But 
overall, my picks for the big 
dance are Kansas City and Green 
Bay. 

Yes football fanatics, a rematch 
of Superbowl I. Mike Holmgren 
has his Packers rolling, on both 
sides of the ball! What a find 
Brett Favre was last year at 
quarterback. Every week I'm 
more impressed with this 
Southern Mississippi graduate 
and one-time Atlanta Falcon. His 
targets are quite impressive with 
Pro Bowler Sterling Sharpe, tight 
end Jackie Harris and former 
Dan Marino target Mark 
Clayton. On the defensive side 
of the ball, I've already 
mentioned Reggie White, but 



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Monday and Tuesdays 
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Located Across from the Clarion Mall 

I STUDENT DISCOUNT CARDS AVAILABLE 



don't forget names like Terrell 
Buckley, Johnny Holland and 
Brian Noble. Maybe no-names, 
but not for long! 

In Kansas City, Derrick 
Thomas leads a very 
opportunistic defensive squad 
that lights up the scoreboard 
themselves. Don't forget AFC 
defensive rookie of the year Dale 



Carter who also excels on kick 
returns. But the presence of 
Montana behind center has KC 
fans booking flights to Atlanta in 
January. Montana makes average 
receivers like JJ Birden, Willie 
Davis and Tony Hargain look 
like ProBowIers. This just might 
be the year in Kansas City. 



Cross-Countrv and Golf 

1993 schedules 

Goff Cross- Country 



Coach: Bpb Carlson 



9-13 at Gannon 

9-16 at Slippery Rock 

9-19 Hansen Tourn 

9-23 at Edinboro 

9-27 at Mercyhurst 

10-5 at Allegheny 

10-19 at Davis & Elkins 



*Home matches in bold 



Coach: Ron Wiser 



9-4 


atCMU 


9-11 


at California 


9-18 


at Indiana 


9-25 


at St. Bonav. 


10-2 


at Bloomsburg 


10-9 


CUP Alumni 


10-16 


at Mt Union 


10-30 


PSAC's 


11-6 


NCAA Regional 


PSAC's at Bloomsburg 


♦NCAA 


•s - Springfield, Mass 




"It's his leg." 



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Monday 

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• SOUND system • AND MORE • 

"Thursday Night Special" 

Pitcher & Draft Specials 8-10 pm 

Tuesday Sunday 

Biggest Wings Karaoke 

In Town Hours 

(.25c each) 9pm - 1am 



The Clarion Call - 9-9-93- Page 23 




Help Wanted 



Needed, gymnastics and/or 
aerobics instructors for local 
program. Experience preferred. 
Call Amy at 677-3000 or 
797-1118. 



Telemarketing -- part-time 
positions, Sunday through 
Thursday evenings, 6:30- 9:30 
p.m., September -- November. 
Annual Alumni phonathon for 
contributions in support of 
Clarion University. Must be 
Clarion University student with 
enthusiastic, pleasant telephone 
personality. Applications 
available from Clarion 
University Foundation, Haskell 
House, Clarion, PA 16214. 
Deadline for applications: 4:30 
p.m. Wednesday, September 15, 
1993. 



Spring Break '94. Sell trips, earn 
cash and go free. Student Travel 
Services is now hiring campus 
reps. Call 1-800-648-4849. 



Frats! Sororities! Student 
Groups! Raise as much as you 
want in One Week. $100. . . 
$600. . . $1,500! Market 
applications for the hottest aedit 
card ever-New GM Mastercard. 
Users earn BIG DISCOUNTS on 
GM cars! Qualify for free t-shirt 
& '94 GMC Jimmy. Call 
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Sales & Services 



C-O-M-I-C-S 
Order your favorite titles at 
a discount. Call (814)-764- 
5778 after 6 p.m. for 
information. 



Personals 



Theta Phi Alpha hopes 
everyone had a great summer 
& that you have an even 
better year. 



Delta Zeta wants to welcome 
everyone back and wish 
everyone a safe and happy 
semester! 



Stephanie Wilshire- Hope you 
had a good summer. We're 
looking forward to a great 
semester. Love, the sisters of 
Phi Sigma Sigma. 



The sisters of Phi Sigma 
Sigma want to wish everyone 
a great fall semester. 



Wanted 



Wanted, Magazines w/ 
photos. Drop off in cardboard 
box at 164 Marwick Boyd. 
Learn American Sign 
Language! Call Continuing 
Education for more info. Ext. 
2227. 



Announcements 



VETERAN ALATEEN 
MEMBERS to help guide and 
encourage new group on 
Wednesday evenings at 8:30 
at the Clarion office Complex 
(Old Hospital), Seventh 
Avenue. Your experience is 
vital. Call Joy at 226-5545 
after 6 p.m. 



Curious about the Catholic 
Church? Inquiring Minds who 
want to know more will meet 
Monday 9/13 at 6:30 p.m.. at 
the United Campus Ministry 
office-267 Gemmell. Call Fr. 
Monty Sayers (226-6869) for 
more info. 



Clarion 

Call 

classifieds 

can ^v'o^k 

for you! 



Cranon Cair^C 

270 Gemmell Center 

Clarion University of PA 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Classifieds must be turned in by 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, the week of publication 

10 Words = $1.00 

Every 5 additional words = $0.50 

Date 

of Publication: 



Bill To: 



Address: 



Phone: 



Signature: 



***CLassified ads will not be printed if there is no signature or 
phone number. Classified ads under $5,00 require prepayment 

Message (Please Print Clearly): 





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Wednesday. Classified ads 

are due by 5 p.m. on 

Tuesday, the week of 

publication. 



Page 24 - The Clarion Call - 9-9-93 



\\ v<4i h firj\ (i^y of c/d/j 4n(\ J|rt< fty^ 

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Garden Fresh Salad^ $1 .99 

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«» vi :*.■;,. «;«* 




Volume 74, Issue 2 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 16, 1993 

Clarion on schedule with plans to 
renovate Founders Hall 

by Michelle Sparer 
Editor-in-Chief 




Creek Alcohoi Policy 

New greek alcobol poliej 
imjrfemented pg, 5 



Features 

Activities Day 

Famous Pittsburgh bamj 
scheduled to appear orj 
Activities Day pg- H 



Sports 



Heartbreaker 

Golden Eagles lose openo" u\ 
Westchester. .pg.l?] 



Clarion's 

Weather Outlook! 



Thursday: 
Frklay: 

Saturday: 

Sunday: 

Monday: 

Tuesday: 

Weitoesday: 



Suimy, cool 
High: 73 
Clear, warmer, 
humid 
High:77 
Sunny, taeezy 
High; 16 
Warmer 
High:82 
Cooler, cloudy 
High: 74 
Partly Sunny 
High: 75 
Partly cloudy 
High: 73 



Index 



Commentary pg. 2 

News pg. 5 

TV Guide pg. K 

Features Pg- Uj 

&Jtertairanent Pg* 16| 

Sports pg 1^1 

Classifieds Pg- 231 



Clarion University is on 
schedule with its plans to 
renovate Founders Hall, said 
Clare Heidler, Director of 
Facilities Management, and if all 
goes well construction is 
expected to begin next summer. 

Harvey Hall and Montgomery 
Hall, at Venango Campus, will 
also eventually receive facelifts, 
he added, although those two 
projects are several years down 
the road. 

Funding for the three projects 
has resulted from Governor 
Casey's Higher Education 
Capital Construction Program 
which is a segment of his 
Operation Jump Start project. 
The Capital Construction 
Program is designed to release 
Slate funds for capital 
construction projects for the 
State System of Higher 
Education (SSHE) and state- 
related universities. 

According to Ron Wilshire, 
director of university relations, 
the projects were orignally 
capital requests in the late 1980's 
with funding authorized last fall 
when Governor Casey 
announced the university 
allotment of the Jump Start 
project. 

The state is providing 75 
percent of the funding for 
construction costs with Clarion 
contributing the remaining 25 
percent. 

Total authorization for 
Founders Hall, said Heidler who 
is serving as the university's 
representative to the Jump Start 
program, is set at approximately 
$2.1 million. Of that amount, 
about $1.8 million is alloted for 
the base consuuction costs. The 
difference, picked up by the 
state, is going towards design 
costs. 

Clarion University's share, or 
25 percent of the SI. 8 million, is 
approximately $456,000 which 
will be raised through a capital 




John Thiem/Clarion Call 
If all goes as expected, renovation on Founders Hall could begin as early as next summer. 
Some of the plans for the building include air conditioning and an elevator. 

fund raising campaign and is respond to a campaign that Clarion faces many funding 

clearly states our needs and how 
we intend to address them," said 
Harry Tripp, vice president for 
university advancement. "As 



still in the development stage. 

"While any capital campaign 
presents challenges, we feel the 
constituents of Clarion will 



challenges in the future, a 
u^adition of giving will serve as 
the foundation for our success." 



(Cont. on pg. 4) 



Students report another morning incident 



by Alan Vaughn 
Managing Editor 



For the second lime in less 
than three weeks, university 
students have been the victims of 
crimes occuring in the early 
morning hours in areas close to 
campds. 

The most recent incident took 
place between 3:30 and 4:00 
a.m., when an unidentified 
individual broke into the Alpha 
Sigma Tau Sorority house on 
Route 68. 

The individual, described to be 



wearing a navy blue t-shirt with 
beige or khaki colored horizontal 
stripes, khaki shorts and brown 
hiking boots, entered the 
dwelling through a basement 
window. The individual pushed 
out a screen to get in, according 
to Missy Fox, Alpha Sigma Tau 
president. 

Fox would not comment on 
what happened once the suspect 
was inside the house. 
Pennsylvania State Police in 
Shippenville acknowledged that 
they were called to the scene, but 
the investigating officer could 



not be reached before press time. 

Fox .said approximately 16 
members of the sorority were in 
the house at the time, but only 
one managed to gel a 
description. The doors of the 
house were locked at the time. 

The last incident took place at 
about 1:24 a.m. on August 21 
when a student reported being 
assaulted on Wilson Avenue, 
adjacent to Campus. The victim 
said a white male approached her 
and held a metal object to her 
throat. No arrests have been 
made. 



Celebrating over 70 years as a student newspaper 



Pa^e 2 - The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 

Opinion 




The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chief 

Alan Vaughn 

Managing Editor 

Rodney Sherman 

News Editor 

Amy Gerkin 

Features Editor 

Ben Vessa 

Sports Editor 

Ray Henderson 

Photography Editor 

Samantha White 

Ad Design 

Chris Clouse 

Advertising Manager 

Brigitte Josefczyk 

Circulation Editor 

& Interim 

Business Manager 

Hans Dovenspike 

Copy/Design Editor 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
yiar in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
hut reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 12:00 p.m. on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 

bcKly. 

Display advertising copy is duo 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 

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The. way I se 




Managing Edito 




Silk Flowers 

I began working at a nursing 
home in December of 1988. I 
anticipated it would be a great 
job; it paid nearly six dollars an 
hour. I pictured hundreds of 
grandmothers knitting by 
fireplaces, baking cookies, 
drinking hot cocoa and giggling 
at the grandfathers who told 
stories of World War One and of 
the Great Depression. My 
grandmother had died four years 
earlier, when I was fifteen, and I 
regretted the fact that we were 
never as close as I thought we 
should have been. She was 
always complaining about 
something, and I just got tired of 
hearing her gripes after a while. 
She spent the last year of her life 
in a nursing home. I never went 
to visit her. 

On the first day of my new job 
I was given a grand tour of the 
home facilities. At tlrst glance, 
it reminded me of my old high 
school -- the tile floors, 
unadorned white walls, and the 
deceiving carpeted lobby with 
expensive looking furniture Uiat 
made it look cozy. Every floor 
had only one entrance from the 
elevator, and a nurse had to press 
the buzzer before the dcx)r would 
open. I later learned these were 
not nurses. They were prison 
guards. Each resident had their 
own room. Some rooms were 
plain like an average hospital 
room; others were fancied up 
with family photographs, 
yellowing orientiil rugs, religious 
statues, television sets, and silk 
flowers. 

My job was to deliver the trays 
of f(xxl to the resident's room nt 
five o'ckx:k in the evening and to 

pick them up again at seven. The 
first week I worked there. I was 
introduced to several older 
people, but none sparked my 
interest as much as Mrs. 
Andrews, When I entered her 
room, the smell of perfume 



Christy Williams 

overwhelmed my senses. Stuffed 
in that small square box of a 
room was a bed iii one comer 
and a recliner in another. A 
stunning, beautifully polished 
white baby grand piano occupied 
the rest of the limited space. 
Most of the women who lived 
there wore jogging suits, night 
clothes or muu-muus. When 
Mrs. Andrews emerged from the 
bathroom her face make-up was 
flawless, and she was wearing a 
fa.shionable designer dress. Her 
stockings and sht)es matched the 
ouUlt perfectly. She was carrying 
a purse, color-coordinated of 

(Cont. on page 3) 



The Berlin Wall fell. The 
eastern bloc crumbled. Yasir 
Aniiat and Yitzhiik Rabin sh(xik 
hands at the White House"! 

It has been a truly magical few 
years, and with all indications, it 
proves to be a hopeful and 
promising future, but not without 
hard and grueling work. 

The Israelis and the 
Palestinians have taken their first 
stumbling, halting steps toward a 
new peace in the Middle East. It 
is only the first step, but as with 
any journey, that is where the 
start lies. 

Former mortal enemies have 
proven that a compromise is 
better than a conflict, that 
treaties are better than troops and 
that negotiations are better than 
confrontations. 

The next test fpr the two 
peoples is perhaps a more 
difficult one than they have 
already achieved. For now they 
have merely recognized each 
other as actual people? as 
individuals rather than: as 
soldiers of an enemy empire. 

Now the two peoples have to 
learn to live wiUi each other. The 
Israelis must learn to grant land 
and rights and to harbor no ill 
will towards those they have 
considered terrorists and 
Uespassers on Uieir land. It is no 
small feat for a nation as security 
conscious as Israel to allow self- 



government and h'uid to a people 
under a leader that they didn't 
even recognize until this week. 

It is no small feat for the PLC) 
to compromise on what it 
considers an ideological and 
holy fight. It is no tiny 
accomplishment for intifada to 
compromise with the infidels. 

Arafat, in an unusual switch, 
has changed roles from rebel 
leader to elder statesman, taking 
his place along side other world 
leaders in working for peace for 
his people. 

Still, Arafat said he will not 
turn in his fatigues for a suit and 
tie. 

"I am not a chameleon. I am 
commander and chief of our 
army and I am proud to have this 
dress," Arafat said. 

Khakis or not, Arafat has 
added to his role as leader of his 
» people and proven that maybe, , 
just maybe, with some diligence 
and with some perserverence, the 
trouble and the polarization in a ; 
long turbulent area of the world 
can have a tranquil end. 

Let us get our hopes up high 
and support wholeheartedly 
these two peoples in their quest 
for a settlement that is acceptable 
for all. Then let us turn our 
attention to other troubled areas 
of the world and use the first, 
cautious steps of Israel and die 
PLO as examples. 




, l,<)u™- MM'* «"""• 



PHILADEiPHIA DAILY NEWS 

Philadelphia 
USA 






•. A- ■...,.. ]!<¥[..<. :v. ..-'.1^. 



The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 - Page 3 



I 



1 
a 



Keader Responses 



Apologies 
from a fan 

Dear Editor: 

I witnessed a grave injustice to 
a Clarion University Coed 
(whose hometown is Erie) at 



Penn State's Beaver Stadium on 
Saturday afternoon, September 
11, and would like to extend to 
her a humble apology on behalf 
of the fans in Row 14 of Section 
WA. 

In spite of having a legitimate 
ticket stub for Section WA, Row 
14, Seat 20, the usher did 



nodiing to remove the child who 
had been "smuggled" in by her 
parents and was sitting in that 
seat. Amidst the confusion, I was 
not able to go to die aid of die 
Clarion Coed as she left the 
.section in tears. 

I would like her to know that I 
personally contacted the office of 



Mr. Herb Schmidt, Assistant 
Athletic r^irector at Penn State 
this morning and reported the 
two ushers who mishandled her 
problem in such an unfair way. 

I do hope you had a good 
weekend with your Penn State 
friends and will be able to come 
back again for another football 



weekend without any hassle 
from the Stadium I Isher. 

Sincerely, 
An Old Penn Staler 
Elvira H. Herring 
Class of 1946 



Hide Park 



(Cont. from page 2) 



course, and I asked her if she 
was going anywhere. She replied 
that she was only waiting for me. 
It was then thai I realized where 
the strong fragrance was coming 
from. Her room was filled with 
silk flowers. Probably a hundred 
different arrangements of silk 
flowers were placed method- 
ically around the narrow room. 
I complimented her on the 
beautiful piano she owned. I 



didn't mention how out of place 
it seemed. 

She began telling me a story of 
how her mother taught her to 
play the piano when she was 
only six. 

After her first three or four 
sentences I glanced at my watch. 
I still had at least twenty trays to 
deliver and it was almost six 
o'clock. I said, "Uh-huh" a few 
times, and then told her I had to 



All letters to the editor must be submitted 

by noon on l\iesday, the week of 

publication and must include 

signature and phone number of the author. 

Hide Park pieces 

are due by 5:00 p.m. Monday, 

the week of publication. 

These too, must include name and 

phone number of the author. 

With either submission, the Clarion Call 

does not guarantee publication and reserves 

the right to edit copy. 



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go. She inquired if I would be 
returning later that evening for 
her tray, and when I told her I 
would she grinned like a child. 

I decided to retrieve all of the 
other resident's trays quickly, so 
when I finally picked up Mrs. 
Andrews' room fifteen minutes 
before I was finished working 
for the day. As I entered the 
room I saw that she was still 
dressed in her stockings and high 
heels. The back of her dress was 
wrinkled. She sat in the recliner, 
and I sat on the floor. She 
immediately began telling me 
about her piano and her mother. 
It was quite an interesting story, 
but she elaborated on many 
details and sort of drifted off the 
subject. 

Realizing that I only had five 
minutes left, I asked her if she 
would play something for me 
before I left. She did; I 
complimented her on her 
performance, and I left. 

The next day as I was 
delivering the trays on Mrs. 
Andrews' floor, I heard the sound 
of a piano. She played all the 
way up until the minute I walked 
in. I didn't realize it at the time, 
but she was playing for me. She 
appeared to be in severe pain as I 
entered. I asked her if she felt 
okay and she answered diat she 



had "a touch of ardiritis." 

She began showing me her silk 
flower arrangements, but I had to 
leave and continue my job. 
Every day I took a few minutes 
out of my day to talk to Mrs. 
Andrews about her moUier, her 
flowers, her piano, her 
grandchildren (who I don't think 
ever visited her), or anything we 
could discuss briefly. Every day 
she must have known when I 
was coming because she filled 
the hallways with her music. 
Every day she was formally 
dressed as if she would be dining 
at a four star restaurant. 

At the beginning of February, 
Mrs. Andrews informed me that 
the administrator of the nursing 
home had forbidden her to 
continue playing the piano. She 
said it disturbed the other 
residents. 

The next day when I entered 
her room, Mrs. Andrews was 
dressed in her night cloUies. She 
was pale. Over the next two 
weeks her silk flowers began to 
collect dust. 

Valentines Day was fast 
approaching, and I had planned 
to take the holiday off to spend 
with my boyfriend. The day 
before Valentines Day I was in 
quite a hurry. I collected Mrs. 
Andrews' tray last, as usual, but 



when she greeted me at the door 
and began showing me, once 
again, her silk flowers, I said 
something I will regret for the 
rest of my life. 

"Why do you keep diese old 
silk flowers anyway?" 

She looked sad. She didn't 
answer me. I told her of my 
hurry, and she showed me to the 
door. 

I had a wonderful Valentines 
Day with my boyfriend. I got 
dressed up, and we went to an 
expensive restaurant. We danced 
and laughed and kissed. 

The next day when I returned 
to work, I was anxious to tell 
Mrs. Andrews what a great time 
I had the evening before. When I 
burst into her room it was totally 
empty. The piano was gone. The 
music was gone. The silk 
flowers were gone. A nurse 
informed me Uiat Mrs. Andrews 
died at seven o'clock the 
previous night. 

She gave me a package Mrs. 
Andrews had left for me. 1 
opened the box to find a silk 
flower arrangement and a note. 
"Silk flowers never die." 

Christy Williams is a 
Sophomore Secondary 
Education, English and special 
Education Major 



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Page 4 - The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 



I 



Renovations. . . 

(Cont. from pf*. I) 



I he renovation design should 
be finished by January or 
I'ebruary. said Heidler, and until 
then, final estimates of 
eonstruction eosts will not be 
known. "We just know we're 
going to be tight on the budget 
right now," he said. 

At this point, said Heidler, 
most of the renovation will 
eoncentraie on the inside of the 
building. Presently the 

arehitectural plans inelude, 
among oilier things, an upgrade 
of classr(X)ms and art studios; the 



installation of air conditioning 
and a sprinkler system; an 
enclosed elevator with both 
indoor and outdoor entrances; 
two stairwells which will replace 
the fire escapes behind the 
building; and carpeting for the 
entire building except the lobby. 
Larger goals include the 
possible removal of the main 
staircase with the addition of rest 
rooms where the landing is now. 
Heidler said they are also 
discu.ssing removing the stained 
gla.ss window within Founders 



and displaying it on the first 
floor, with back lighting, where 
the main staircase is presently 
placed. If it's remounted, said 
Heidler, artwork will be placed 
jiround it to enhiince il.s features. 
Heidler said the renovation is 
estimated to last a year, which 
means most students and faculty 
who use the building will be 
rerouted elsewhere, such as 
Carlson Library's and Pierce 
Science Center's classrooms. At 
this point, said Heidler. no 
decisions have been made as to 
faculty relocation. 



Ads deny the Holocaust 



by John Williams 
College Press Service 

Campus newspapers will be 
forced again to face the 
explosive issue of running ads 
that question the historical 
accuracy of the Holocaust, 
reopening the debate at schools 
as to whether such 
advertisements should be 
printed. 

Several campus newspapers in 
the past two years have printed 
such ads from the Committee on 
Open Debate on the Holocaust, a 
California-based organization 
that believes the facts about the 
slaughter of millions of 
Kuropean Jews during World 
War 11 were distorted. 

Student editors were forced 
into a debate on an issue where 
no debate should ever be held, 
opponents to the ads say, adding 
that free speech is not protected 
when it involves printing 
outright lies. 

However. Bradley Smith. 



director of the committee, said 
he is going to try to place ads in 
campus newspapers this fall, 
except this time the ads arc for 
21 videotapes that he says give 
proof the Holocaust never 
occurred. And since he is 
offering an item for sale, and not 
just printing his opinion in an ad, 
Smith said college newspapers 
will have to judge the ads on 
their "merits" and not their 
messages. 

But for many student editors, 
the issue is one of freedom of 
expression and open debate. 
Ads, however, don't necessarily 
have to be run and there are "no 
legal consequences" if a 
newspaper rejects an ad, said 
Mark Goodman, director of the 
Washington-based Student Press 
Law Center. 

"The bottom line is that 
newspapers can do cither. They 
can legally run the ad or not. 
Lditors have the right to choose 
and to include what ads they can 
run or not," Goodman said. 
"Nobody can force an 



advertisement on them." 

In recent years the issue has 
been heated regardless of 
whether the ads were printed. 
The advertisement, titled "The 
Holocaust Story: How Much Is 
False? The Case for open 
Debate," has been placed in a 
number of campus newspapers 
nationwide, but other student 
newspapers have rejected it. 

The subject is growing in 
scope-- there are now books 
written on the denial of the 
Holocaust, two of which were 
featured in the Sunday New 
York Times book review section 
this sununer. 

"I was blown away by their 
success in fooling some very 
smart people that they should be 
taken seriously," said Deborah 
Lipstadt, a religion profes.sor at 
Emory University in Atlanta and 
author of "Denying the 
HolcKaust. The Growing Assault 
on Truth and Memory." 

Lipstadt describes Holocaust 
deniers as "white supremacists," 
who shouldn't get a forum. 



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Dave Barry 

The spell of Niagara Falls 



©1993 Miami Herald 



If you're lot)king for a family 
vacation that involves watching 
enonnous quantities of water go 
off a cliff, you can't beat Niagara 
Pedis. 

We went there recently with 
several other families, and our 
feeling of awe and wondennent 
can best be summed up by the 
words of my friend Libby 
Burger, who, when we first 
beheld the heart-stopping 
spectacle of millions of gallons 
of water per second hurtling over 
the precipice and Uiundering into 
the mist-enshrouded gorge 
below, said: "I have to tinkle." 

The Falls have been casting 
this magical spell ever since they 
were discovered thousands of 
years ago by Native Americans, 
who gave them the name 
"Niagara," which means "Place 
Where There Will Eventually Be 
Museums Dedicated, for No 
Apparent Reason, to 
Frankenstein, John F. Kennedy, 
Harry Houdini and Elvis." And 
this has certainly proved to be 
true, as today the area around the 
falls features an extremely dense 
wad of tourist attractions. In 
addition to the museums (both 
wax and regular), there was a 
place where you could see tiny 
scale models of many world- 
famous buildings such as the 
Vatican; plus one of Uie world's 
largest floral clocks; plus, of 
course, miniature golf courses, 
houses of horror and countless 
stores selling souvenir plates, 
cups, clocks, knives, spoons, 
refrigerator magnets, ther- 
mometers, folding combs, 
toothbrushes, toenail clippers, 
hats, T-shirts, towels, boxer 
shorts and random slabs of 
wood, all imprinted with what 
appears to be the same blurred, 
heavily colorized picture, taken 
n about 1948, depicting some 
object that could be Niagara 
Falls, or could also be hamsters 
mating. 

Of course the big tourism 
attraction is Niagara Falls, a 
geological formation caused by 
the Great Lakes being attracted 
toward gravity. 

Also limestone is involved. We 
learned these facts from a giant- 
screen movie about the Falls that 
we paid to get into after the 
children became bored with 
looking at the actual Falls, a 
process that took them perhaps 
four minutes. They are modern 
children. They have Nintendo. 
They have seen what appears to 



be a real dinosaur eat what 
appears to be a rciU lawyer in the 
movie ".Jurassic Park." They are 
not about to be impressed by 
mere water. 

The movie featured a dnunatic 
re-enacuneni of the ancient Falls 
legend of "The Maid of the 
Mist." This was an Indian 
maiden whose father wanted her 
to marry a fat, toothless old man 
who, in the movie, looks a lot 
like U.S. Hou.se of 
Representatives Ways and 
Means Committee Chairman and 
noted stamp collector Dan 
Rostenkowski wearing a bad 
wig. 

The maiden was so upset about 
this that she paddled a canoe 
over the Falls, thus becoming 
one with the Thunder God, the 
Mist God, the God. of Canoe 
Repair, etc. At least Uiat is the 
legend. Some of us were 
skeptical. As my friend Gene 
Weingarten put it: "I think she 
became one with the rocks." 

Since that time, a number of 
people have gone over the Falls 
in barrels, not always with 
positive health results. 

What would motivate people to 
take such a terrible risk? My 
theory is that they were tourists. 
They probably paid 

ADMISSION to get into the 
barrels. I bet that, even as they 
were going over the brink, they 
were videotaping the barrel 
interiors. 

Of course now it's illegal to go 
over Uie Falls, which - and here 
I speak strictly from a tourism- 
promotion standpoint - is too 
bad. I think they'd get bigger 
crowds up Uicre, and definitely 
hold the attention of youngsters 
longer, if there was a chance 
that, while you were watching, 
something other than water 
would go over the brink, such as 
— these are just suggestions -- 
one of the world's largest floral 
clocks, or the House Ways and 
Means Committee, or a 30-foot 
Winnebago motor home. 
("Roger, I TOLD you we 
shouldn't have turned left back 
there." 

"Shut up. Marge! IIIIS IS A 
SHORTCUT!" 

"OH NOOOOO. . ." 
"SAVE THE VIDEO 
CAMERA, MARGE!") 



Dave Barry is a syndicated 
columnist with the Miami 
Herald 



1 



The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 - Page 5 

News 




Greeks will self -police alcohol policy 



by Chad Briggs 
News Writer 



Clarion Fraternities can no 
longer roll out the barrel, as the 
new IFC alcohol policy sets 
down new regulations to cover 
fraternity partying. 

Under the Greek Alcohol 
Related Events Policy, 
fraternities hosting an alcohol 
related event, defined as any 
event in which alcohol is present 
and also under the names 
"mixer, invite party, formal, date 
party, picnic, exchange, 
founder's day," or others, must 
adhere to certain strict, new 
guidelines. The Panhellenic 
Council, which governs the 
university sororities, has not yet 
passed the policy. 

Fraternities hosting an alcohol 
related event may either contract 
with a private facility with a 
liquor Jicense to hold the event 
or require guests to Bring Your 
Own Beverage (BYOB). In 
addition to this requirement, 
fraternities may not openly 
solicit or encourage alcohol 
consumption by any contests or 
promotions, such as drinking 
games. They may not co- 
sponsor an event with any 
organization, such as a bar, that 
sells or gives away alcohol to 
those present. 

"I believe that this policy is 
part of the natural evolution of 
the Greek system. The days of 
the Animal House parties are 
done," said IFC Vice President 
Ron Berry. 

Under the BYOB guidelines, a 



fraternity can not have an open 
party. Guest lists are required for 
each event, with any persons not 
on the list not admitted. Each 
guest must present positive proof 
of his or her age and persons 
under 21 must be marked as 
such. The policy suggests ink 
hand stamps cw wrist bracelets to 
distinguish underage persons 
from tho.se over 21. 

Each guest of drinking age 
may bring no more than two 
alcoholic beverages for each 
hour of the party, with the 
maximum number of beverages 
not to exceed six. Common 
sources of alcoholic beverages, 
such as kegs, party balls and 
punch bowls, are prohibited. 
Hard liquor is prohibited, and 
devices that encourage rapid 
consumption of alcohol (beer 
bongs) are also not permitted. 

Each chapter also must 
designate members, who are not 
drinking, to dispense the alcohol 
brought by members, wiUi one 
server for every 30 guests. 
Guests may be dispensed only 
one beverage at a time, and must 
return the empty beverage 
container to receive a new one. 

Permitted days and times for 
the policy are also established. 
Fraternities may hold alcohol 
related events Thursdays, from 
4:00 p.m. to midnight; Fridays 
from 4:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.; 
Saturdays from 11:00 a.m. to 
2:00 a.m. and Sundays from 1:00 
p.m. to midnight. No alcohol 
related events may be held from 
Monday to Wednesday, with die 
exception of certain holidays and 



IFC to offer free weekend taxi service 

Begining Thursday, September 16, the Interfratemity Council will 
offer all University students an alternative to walking home alone or 
driving under Uie influence of alcohol. ITie l.F.C. will pay for any 
student who needs a ride between the hours of 9 P.M. and 2 A.M. 
Thursday through Saturday. They have chartered the Clarion Taxi 
service. 

The idea of the taxi service was brought about by Ron Berry, vice - 
president of the l.F.C. and member of Sigma Chi. "1 did this so 
students, especially gijis, could feel safer at night, and 1 wanted to cut 
down on drunk driving in Clarion." 

The Interfratemity Council advisor, John Postlewait, will oversee 
this activity. 

Any student can use this serice, as long as they have their student 
identification to verify that they are a student. 
The taxi number is 745-2346 or 1-800-440- TAXI. 

by Christy Williams 
News Writer 




mmmmm^»>»^' 



Bo Wilson / Clarion Call 
Cases of beer won't move as freely as they did during the wild days of the gang at "Animal 
House" under the new alcohol policies being adopted by greek organizations. 



the weeknight before die start of 
a long weekend created by a 
holiday 

Infractions of die policy will 
be referred to the appointed 
Greek Council, which will be 
comprised of students, faculty 
and administrators, for 
investigation within five 
academic days or seven calander 
days of the incident. All 
monitors of Greek alcohol 
related events will be members 
of the campus Greek 
organizations and will travel in 
groups of five or more to ensure 
compliance widi the policy. 

The main concerns of the 
monitors will be to make sure 
that fraternities hosting the 
parties will be checking 
identification, markins hands to 
distinguish those underage from 
those over 21, making sure Uiat 
underage individuals are not 
being served, that Uiere are no 
common sources of alcohol and 
that party guests are not out of 
control, according to the plan. 

"I think it will work. It will cut 
down on a lot of problems. It 
works at other schools," said 
Jason Fularz, president of IFC. 

The policy was originally 
passed on May 4 and scheduled 
to take effect this semester. 
Panhellenic council may vote on 
the measure later Uiis semester. 



The conception for die policy 
orginated in March 1991, 
through the efforts of the Greek 
Alcohol Task Force, IFC, 
Panhel, and the Pennsylvania 
Liquor Control Enforcement 
agency. 

Since dial lime, four separate 
drafus have been generated, with 
this final one passing earlier Uiis 
year. 

The policy was adopted in 
order to set a specific list of 
regulations that all Greek 
organizations could follow and 
still be in accordance with each 
individual organization's national 
guidelines concerning alcohol. 

"I feel fraternities are showing 
a lot of responsibility by 
undertaking such a task," said 
John PosUewaite, IFC advisor. 

Reaction from Greeks on 
campus was mosdy positive. 

"After two years of hard work 
by die studenLs, it's great to see a 
workable policy emerging. 
Hopefully, by the end of the 
semester. Clarion Uni\'ersity will 
see an all Greek alcohol policy," 
said Amy Donahue, a member of 
Phi Sigma Sigma. 

Patrick Cihonski, a member of 
Sigma Tau Gamma, said, "This 
p(iicy is a great thing for Greek 
lite here at Clarion. It shows 
odiers that parties mc not what it 
is idl about." 



Still, some were less than 
totally pleased with the result. 

"Being part of the alcohol task 
force, I believe that this will help 
in maintaining order and safety 
as far as pjirties and alcohol, but 
I believe that we were not given 
the voice that we should have 
been given," said Sara Raught, a 
Delta Phi Epsilon. "1 sat dirough 
meetings revising and 
compromising only to have the 
final draft and vote passed 
without a final meeting and open 
forum Uiat we were promised. " 

President of Phi Sigma Kappa, 
Scott Dillon, .said, "The alcohol 
policy will only work as well as 
the Greek system wants it to. I 
see a lot of animosity towju^ds 
Uiis policy by the Greek system 
as a whole. It will be very 
interesting to see where we all 
stand in terms of compliance 
later on in Uie yau." 

A possible scenjirio in the new 
system could have the LCE 
ob.serving a party held under die 
policy. 

The agents would not issue 
citations, but would offer advice 
and recommendations on how to 
improve the smooth 

implementation of the new 
guidelines. 

The proposal is being 
considered iuid a final decision is 
pending 



Paj»c 6 - The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 



Fire prevention campaign kicks off this week at CUP 



hy Kim Modis 
News Writer 



Bclwccn May ol 1992 and 
May ol 1093, Ihcre were live 
strucUire fires in Clarion, whieh 
alTecled 20 Clarion llniversily 
sliidenls. Nohody is immune 
Ironi the danger ol lire, but with 
eommon sense and taking a lew 
precautions many lires can be 
prevented. 

Dr. l.ouis 'rrip<xli, a firemiin 
at the Chu^ion I'ire IX'pjirUnent, 
has some advice for students on 
how to prevent fires. The most 



important piece of advice he had 
for students is to simply use 
common sense. Dr. Iripodi 
suggests that all residences have 
smoke detectors and fire 
extinguishers. If you do not 
have smoke detectors and/or fire 
extinguishers in your house or 
ap;u"tment, this is .something to 
discu.ss Willi your huidlord. 

Tripodi suggests smoke 
declectors should be IcKaled in 
sleeping areas and at the base of 
stairwells. There should be one 
for each level in a home, and you 
should never take the batteries 



out of a smoke detector, f^rc 
extinguishers should be checked 
to tnake sure they lu^e properly 
pressurized, and they .should be 
located in kitchen and furnace 
areas. 

Some other common .sense tips 
Dr. TripixJi offers ju-e: do not put 
space heaters nciu' drapes or by 
beds where blankeLs can fall into 
them, do not cover heat 
registers, do not overload .scKkets 
with electrical outlet.s, and do not 
smoke in bed. If you burn 
candles, always bum tJiem in an 
enclosed container Dr. Triptxli 



also cautions students not to put 
gasoline in kerosene heaters, and 
if your furnance goes out, call 
your landlord or your landlord's 
plumbing contractor, do not use 
your oven as a heat source. It 
would iil.so be a g(XKl idea to get 
your Christmas uee lireprooled. 

In the event of a fire, you 
should call 911, but get out of 
your house or apartment first if 
there is any immediate danger. 
You should know your escape 
routes in advance .should a fire 
occur. 

If you live in the residence 



halls remember to always vacate 
the building immediately when a 
fire alarm goes off. You must 
never assume that it is a false 
alarm. Although the 

construction, fire alann systems, 
availability of fire fighting 
equipment, and supervision in a 
donn may make you feel safe, 
you must remember that no 
structure is immune from lire 
and .smoke. 

All students living both on and 
off campus must remember to 
exercise common .sense and take 
necessary precautions. 



Fraternity hijinks linked to high testosterone levels 



CPS- Two University of 
Nebraska-Lincoln leaders doubt 
a recent study that blames 
testosterone levels for 
rambunctious fraternity 

members' behavior. 

Members of three "rowdy" 
Iranternities at an unidentified 
university had higher 
testosterone levels than members 



of two "responsible" ones, 
according to a study by James 
Dabbs Jr., professor of 
psychology at Georgia State 
University in Atlanta. 

The testosterone levels in the 

rambunctious fraternities 

measured in the higher end of 

the normal nuige, the study said. 

Ninety-eight fraternity 



members were tested for the 
study. 

Scott Bunz, Interfraternity 
Council president and a member 
of Alpha Gamma Sigma 
fraternity at IJNL. said the study 
was ludicrous. 

Dr. Russell F. LaBeau, the 
medical director of student 
health services at Nebraska, also 




Ray Henderson / Clarion Call 
These students found a place to study In the Gemmell center after being asked to leave the 
library at 9:00 p.m. Monday night. Pictured left to right are senior marketing majors: Jim 
Trotta, Brandee Payne, Michele Anthony, Samantha Peterson and Jennifer Gwln. 



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questioned the validity of the 
study's results. 

Saliva, which was used in the 
study, is a less accurate medium 
than blood for testing 
testosterone, LaBeau said. 

"The author would agree with 
me that not enough research has 
been done to make heads or tails 
of this," he said. 

But LaBeau said the study 
could have a shred of validity 
because testosterone was related 
to anabolic steroids. 

Steroids, which are used for 
body bulking, are known to 



cause aggressive behavior when 
used in high doses, he said, it 
was not known if the men had 
used steroids or not. 

Labeau said the study indicated 
that the testosterone levels were 
still in the normal range, and 
thus really shouldn't cause much 
difference in behavior. 

LaBeau and Benz said they 
blamed rambunctious behavior 
on factors other than testosterone 
levels, usually the examples set 
by friends and fraternity brothers 
determine behavior by new 
members. 



Public Safety 
Blotter 



The following is a brief synopsis of criminal investigations 
conducted by Public Safety for the week of Sept. 6 through Sept. 
12,1993. 

At approximalcly 12:50 a.m.. Sept 9, several sludcnis were 
involved in a fist fight in the area of parking lot "L." Two actors lied 
the .scene while the other two continued to light. Both actors who 
continued to fight were placed in custody and cited for disorderly 
conduct. Both individuals were transported to Chu'ion Hospital for 
treatment. This incident was reported to Student Atiairs. An 
investigation is conlinuinti. 



A lein^de studcMit was cited for public drunkncss Sept. 10, at 2:35 
a.m. when ob.served to be very intoxicated. This incident took place in 
the area of pju-king lot "Y." 

Sept. 11, at approimately 1:00 a.m., a male student was as.saulled 
between Nair and Wilkinson llall. The victim reported two males 
were walking towju"d him when one of die individuals tripped on the 
steps. The other male asked the victim, "Why did you trip my friend.'" 
The victim answered, "1 did not trip him." Turning away from the 
actor, the victim received a punch to the back of tiie head, kncKking 
him to the ground. The incident is under investigation. 



If anyone has any information concerning these cr other crimes, 
please contact Public Safety at 226-2111. 



The Clarion Call - 9-16-93- Page 7 



Student senate opens the year 



by Christin Mihon 
News Writer 



The Clarion University 
Student Senate held its first 
official meeting of the new 
academic year at 7:30 Monday 
evening in 246 Gemmell. 

President Gara Smith opened 
the meeting and welcomed the 
return of the 1993 student 
senators and officers. 

All but one senator attended 
the meeting, and Jenny Ebersole, 
the newly hired .senate secretary, 
attended her first meeting in that 
capacity. 

Topics discussed included the 
cash allowance policy at the 
Gemmell Snack Bar, the 1995- 
96 academic calendar, voter 
registration, the re-installment of 
acceptable library hours and the 
issue of campus safety. 

Recent assaults around the 
campus have caused reasonable 
concern to students about the 
safety of traveliiTg on or near 
campus. 

Student senate brought up the 
issue that Clarion University 
remains the only state school 
without a campus escort policy, 
due partially to the lack of 
student interest and participation. 
Other safety issues included 
comments on poorly lit and 
potentially dangerous areas on 
campus, a possible night-time 
.shuttle for students, and the pros 
and cons of implementing a 
key-card system in the 
dormitories. 



Smith and the student .senate 
made a verbal commitment to 
help improve safety conditions at 
Chirion University. 

Still feeling the pressure of 
unchanged library hours, the 
student senate will take action on 
re-instating the extended hours if 
personnel are not hired to work 
the additional shifts by the end 
of the week. 

The 1995-96 academic 
calendar was reviewed, and the 
.senate will soon seek student 
opinion concerning the 
possibility of fall-break co- 
inciding with Clarion's Autumn 
Leaf Festival and having winter- 
break at the same time as the 
majority of other colleges and 
universities across the state. 

Student opinion would be 
gathered during this fall's student 
senate elections. The vote would 
be non-binding and used to 
determine if the issue should be 
taken before the president's 
executive council. 

Dr. Curtis, vice president for 
student affairs, took 
responsibility for a computer 
error that allowed students to 
apply their cash allowance to the 
same meal several times. This 
problem has since been corrected 
and due to the misunderstanding 
that may have occurred, any 
student who chose an optimum 
plan can now change to a 
standard plan with a refund of 
the difference and unused flex 
dollars. 

Students who wish to change 




Dr. Curtis, vice president for 
senate for the 1993-94 year. 

plans must notify the Office of 
Student Affairs by Sept. 22, 
1993. 

Student senate will begin its 
annual voter registration drive on 
Activities Day, Sunday Sept. 19. 

According to Smith, the senate 
is currently evaluating the 
operations of the Clarion 
Students Association and will 
issue a report later in the 
semester. 

Smith read a letter she received 
from Diane Reinhard, university 
president, which listed several 
important items which occurred 



Jim Collins / Clarion Call 
student affairs, attended the first meeting of the student 
Curtis addressed recent meal plan problems. 



over the summer months. 

Smith, reading from the letter, 
said, "First, we have received 
formal notice of reaccreditation 
from the Conunission on Higher 
Education of the Middle States 
Association of Colleges and 
Schools. 

"Reaccreditation for Clarion 
University is the culmination of 
a two-year process that involved 
a comprehensive self-study of 
our educational programs and a 
campus visit this spring by 
Middle States evaluators. 

"We have also received 



positive comment from the 
National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher 
Education (NCATE) and expect 
formal notice of reaccreditation 
soon. Both the Middle states and 
the NCATE accreditations are 
important to Clarion because 
they provide public assurances 
that our programs have met those 
standards set by professionals in 
the Held." 

Student senate meets every 
Monday evening at 7:30, 246 
Gemmell. Students are 
encouraged to attend. 



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Page 8 - The Clarion Call 

News feature 



9-16-93 



Work experience benefits CUP students 



by Katie Zaikoski 
News Writer 



Wiih ihe help of his sludent 
employees. Clarion Express 
manager Kelly Best is 
successfully 'operating the 
con\enience store that provides 
handy snacks and necessities 
while also giving students a 
hands on experience and vital 
u^aining in the business field. 

Best has been operating the 
Express since it first opened in 
May of 1992. Under his 
managerial expertise are seven 
Clarion students and three 
permanent part-lime clerks. The 
students are paid minimum wage 
and average between 10 and 15 
hours a week, depending on their 
schedule. On the weekends the 
adult part-time help is 
responsible for operating the 
Express so the students have 
access to needed sundries and 
quick food supplies. "The main 
reason that we wanted to hire an 
adult part-time is because they 
have to deal with the security 
system and there is a lot more 
responsibility involved." 

Patty Shaw, a non-student, said 
she enjoys being a part-time 
clerk and working with the 
student employees. "I like 
working with the public. It's the 
kind of work I've always done 
and 1 also like all my 
responsibilities," she added. 

A managerial position is 



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A special class for 

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Oct.1,1993 

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sometimes difficult rcg;irdle.ss of 
where it might be. There are 
many jobs that must be 
completed in addition to waiting 
on customers and running the 
cash register. Best says he tries 
to prepare his employees as 
much as possible in case he 
might be called away from the 
store. "1 try to get everyone 
trained because the students are 
responsible to run the store while 
I'm gone, 1 depend on them a 
lot," Best said. 

According to freshman Mike 
Haft, working for the Express 
has taught him how to work with 
money and give change. "It 
helps me meet new people since 
I am a freshman and it's also 
beneficial because I get to work 
with and learn more about the 
public." 

Because the student employees 
assist with the management of a 
successful business, the selection 
process can be sometimes 
difficult. "The job is open to 
everyone who applies. If you get 
them as a freshman then you get 
them for four years. I look for 
someone who is qualified and is 
going to be friendly and pleasant 
to customers. On the average I 
receive 70 applicants and can 
only choose seven or eight," 




Scott Dillon / Clarion Call 
The Clarion Express store, located in the Gemmell complex, helps students two ways. It 
serves as a convenience store as well as a part-time place of employment. 



Best said. 

Express Shop employees are 
responsible for receiving goods, 
putting food on to heat, running 
the register, checking in vendor's 
deliveries and maintaining the 
facilities. Managing the Express 
is a full time job for Best and he 
works approximately 37 hours 
per week. Best said "whenever 
I'm here I consider them all 



equal employees and try to work 
with them instead of them 
working for me. It's a team 
effort" 

In addition to providing 
students with weekly wages, 
Best also is opening the gateway 
to future life in the business 
world. Today's experience will 
pay off later, after school. 
"I think it's very beneficial to 



the student to work here because 
they get to learn about how a real 
business works. The students 
don't know where they're going 
to end up someday. 

They might graduate with an 
arts degree, but maybe they'll 
have to manage a coi!Venience 
store until they find additional 
work. It teaches them quite a bit 
about everything," he said. 



Disabilities handbook to be distributed on campus 



by Christy Willams 
News Writer 



A University Handbook on 
Disabilities is in the prcKCSS of 
being distributed to all Clarion 
University faculty. 

This is the fourth edition of the 
handbook, which is edited by 
Pamela Gent, Chair of the 
President's Commission on 
Disabilities. 
Gent also wrote and distributed 



the handbook. She refers to the 
handbook as, " A way to help 
University faculty meet their 
le«al oblisations." 
" The University Handbook on 
Disabilities has been prepared as 
a guide for faculty, staff and 
students in deepening their 
understanding of disabilities and 
in facilitating their efforts to 
determine appropriate 

accommodations, said University 
President Diane L. Reinhard. 



The publication includes twelve 
general recommendations for 
faculty and staff to remember 
when working with students who 
are disabled. 

One of the main points the 
handbook stresses is that you 
should deal with the person, not 
their disability. 

Remember that they are 
students and people, not just a 
disability. The handbook 
describes the types of disabilities 



frequently encountered in a 
classroom, and it gives faculty 
new insight into ways to 
acconunodate disabled students. 
The handbook received 
honorable mention from the 
Association of Higher Education 
and Di.sabilities. 

If any disabled student has a 
problem with their 

accommodations, they should 
contact the Office of Social 
Equity, in Carrier Hall. 



From the Community Service Learning Office 

Upcoming projects: 

October 1& 2; Homeless for a weekend. Help raise money for Habitat for Humanity. Call Lynn 
at 226-2711 or Kelly at 226-3524 

October 2 & 3; S.A.F.E. (Stop Abuse For Everyone) Historic House Tour. We need people to 
conduct tours, serve refreshments and greet visitors at the president's residence, Moore Hall; 
from 1 :00 to 5:00 each day. Shifts available. Call Lynn at 226-2711. * 

October 6; Food for friends soup kitchen. Organizational meeting will be held Sept. 23, 5:00 pm 
in 279 Gemmell. Call Lynn at 226-2711 or Kelly at 226-3524 



The Clarion Call - 9-16-93- Page 9 



i 



Outside Clarion 



A possible new era of peace in the Middle East 



courtesy of Associated Press 
International 

Historic peace pact .signed 

In a moment of hope and 
history, Yasser Arafat and ftime 
Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
exchanged handshakes of peace 
before a cheering White House 
audience Monday after signing a 
PLO-Israeli pact thai once 
seemed unimaginable. 

Arafat, wearing his trademark 
headdress draped in the shape of 
a map of Palestine, said the 
agreement should mark "the end 
of a chapter of pain and suffering 
which has lasted throughout this 
century." 

"Enough of blood and tears. 
Enough," said a gravelly voiced 
Rabin. "We wish to open a new 
chapter in the sad book of our 
lives together, a chapter of 
mutual recognition, of good 
neighborliness, of mutual 
respect, of understanding." 

The two men, mortal enemies 
for a generation, watched from 
several yards apart as aides 
.signed the historic agreements 
that will bring Palestinian rule to 
the Israeli-occupied West Bank 
and Gaza Strip. 

After the signing, drawn to 
Rabin by President Clinton, a 
grinning Arafat extended his 
hand. 

After a moment's hesitation, 
Rabin reached out for a 
businesslike handshake. Rabin, 
who as an Israeli general 
captured the West Bank and 
Gaza, wa.s stony faced. 



American soldiers wounded in 
Somalia 

U.S. soldiers came under what 
they called heavy sniper fire 
Monday and responded by 
calling in helicopter gunships, 
returning i'M more than thel got 
in an intense, two-hour firelight. 
Three Americans were 
wounded, none seriously. A 
spokesman for fugitive warlord 
Mohamed Farrah Aidid said at 
least 25 Somalis were killed and 
many more were wounded, 
including civiliiuis. 

Maj. David Stockwell, the 
chief U.N. military spokesman, 
refuted a claim by Aidid's 
supporters that 12 Americans 
were killed. "Absolutely not, 
without a doubt," he said. 

Crackdown on neo-Nazis in 
Berlin 

In a speech marking the 
unofficial start of the national 
election campaign, German 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
Monday, promised a crackdown 
on neo-Nazis and said Germans 
would have to work harder and 
longer. 

In October 1994, the 63-year- 
old Kohl will stake his dozen 
years in the chancellor's office 
against a challenge from Rudolf 
Scharping, the opposition Social 
Democrats' 45-year-old 

ciuididate. 

Critics .say Kohl has bungled 
piu^ts of German re-unification, 
and blame him for persistant 
neo-Nazi violence that has 
occurred over the recent months. 



XQiLBeMhniEiB 



National 

Trade center bombing trial 
starts 

Just one day after the historic 
signing of a Mid-East peace 
treaty, jury selection began 
Tuesday in the case that brought 
fears of Middle East terror to 
Americjui shores. 

The impact of those fears on 
potential jurors could be a huge 
obstacle to the defense, and 
lawyers say jury selection could 
be the most important part of the 
U-ial. 

Close to 5,000 potential jurors 
have to be interviewed. That 
process could take weeks and the 
trial proceedings might last the 
rest of the year 



Clinton approves limited deals 
with Vietnam 

In a gesture to Vietnam, 
President Clinton Monday 
agreed to allow American finns, 
for the first tune, to compete for 
development projects lunded by 
international lending institutions 
in that country. 

In a statement. White House 
Press Secretary Dee Dee Myers 
said the limited role Clinton is 
allowing U.S. businesses in 
Vietnam was in recognition of 
recent steps tiiken by Vietnam to 
provide an accounting of 
American POW's and MIA's and 
to encourage further progress. 

While allowing new limited 
deals, Clinton extended the trade 
embrago in effect since 1975. 



Warm winter predicted 

The 1994 Old Farmer's 
Almanac, released oti Tuesday, 
predicts a warm winter and a 
cool spring, l-rom the Great 
Lakes down the Ohio River 
Vjilley, it should be wiu-mer Uian 
normal, it says. 

Spring should be significantly 
cooler just about everywhere. 
The eastern third of the country 
and the Northwest should be 
relatively dry. 

The almanac makes no 
apologies for mi.ssing the call on 
this year's f]oQd in the Midwest. 

"If anyone had handed you a 
forecast that predicted a once-in- 
500-years flood, would you have 
believed that?" asked .lohn 
Pierce, publisher of the ahnanac. 




Campus 



News 




courtesy of 

College Press Service 

Workshop teaches thinking 
skills 



While most of the counu^'s 
college freshmen were still on 
sununer break, 290 members of 
the imcoming class at Bard 
College, located at Annadale on 
Hudson, New York, had met 
roommates, settled into donns, 
and were steeped in an unusal 
three-week workshop that 
plunged them into acadcmia 
before the semester offically 
started. 

The Language and Thinking 
Workshop, known as L&T, is a 
series of intensive classes 
designed to leach students how 
to compose, read and interpret 
texts as well as how to edit their 
own writing. 

Bard invited professors from 
universities all over the country; 
artists, economists, 

anthropologists, mathematicians 
<'uid jouralists, to teach groups of 
a dozen students about how to 
interpret text and how to write. 

*'As a jumping off point, 
students read from an anthology, 
which this year included writings 
by such authors as Sappho, Carl 
Jung , W.H. Auden and experts 
at the Harviu-d Medical School," 
said Paul Connolly, director of 
Bard's In.stitute for Writing and 
Thinkins. 



Flood survivors will feel stress 



John F. Snyder, a psychologist 
from Southern Illinois University 
at Carbondale, II., predicts that 
Midwest flood victims will have 
tough time readjusting when the 
glare of the media dims, support 
dwindles and relief money and 
goods stop flowing in. 

"Emotional stress comes as 
part of being involved in an 
event," said Snyder, "But 
afterward, when nothing can be 
done anymore, you start to see 
physiological problems." 

Snyder heads SIUC's "Go-out 
Team," a group of psychology 
students who experience what 
disaster victims are going 
through by becoming pait of it. 

Snyder suggested that flood 
victims express their feelings 
and not lose their connections 
that come from fiunily, friends 
and churchs. 

Average textbook price climbs 

Sticker shock isn't just 
confined to automobiles. New 
and returning college students 
can expect to see higher prices 
for textbooks in their campus 
bookstores, reports Campus 
Marketplace, the newsletter for 
The National Association of 
College Stores. 

The study said prices rose 
neiu'ly 91.5 percent from 198.^ to 
199.1. There was a 4.8 percent 
increase from 1992 to 1993. 



Seminar looks at the downside 
to law 

A course at the Widener 
University College of Law is 
designed to teach law students 
how to avoid the perils of a legal 
practice outside the couruoom or 
office. 

Neiuly one-third of the nation's 
attorneys suffer from depression, 
alcohol or drug abu.se. The class, 
"Mastering the Non-legal 
Challenges of Practicing Law," 
will be offered for the fall tcnn. 
This course doesn't deal with 
how to himdie computers or find 
parking places, but delves into 
the reality that many lawyers 
don't like the profession and how 
they don't know how to deal with 
the su-css. 

"It appears a very large portion 
of lawyers are either very 
dissatisfied with their careers, 
suffer from some fonn of mental 
illness, or have become problem 
drinkers," said Amiriun l:lwork, 
director of the law-psychology 
graduate program at Widener 
University in Chester, Pa. 

Studies show that lawyers are 
more likely to suffer from 
depression than other 
occupational groups in the 
United States. Billable hour 
expectations have nearly doubled 
in the past 15 years, to about 
2,000 to 2.500 hours a year. The 
number of attorneys in the nation 
are expected to be arouiul one 
million hv the vc.n 2(H)() 



Page 10 - The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 

Cable Chi mnels 



SS TV 

DATA 



THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 16. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



Playhouse 



Afterschool Special 



Edition 



4:30 



Age-lnnoc. 



Oprah Winfrey Q 



Cheers g 



Les Brown Teens and sex 



Tom-Jerry 



CopsQ 



Tiny Toon 



Cur. Affair 



(300) Convicts Four 



Max Out (R) 



Pyramid 



Dream Lg. 



Pyramid 



(315) Were Talkm 



(3:30) LiQht m Jungle 



Muppets I Crazy Kids 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



** 



TAie Palermo Connection (1991) James Belushi q 



News Q 



Cheers i 



Newsg 



News 



Geraldo Female gangs 



Oprah Winfrey Q 



Animaniacs [Batman g 



Newsg 



News 



News 



News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsg 



FuH House Q 



Newsg 



Roseanne g 



NBC News 



*»V? 7he Bia Gamb/e (1961) Stephen Boyd 



NFL Yrbk. 



Parfcer Lewis 



Max Out 



Facts of Life 



Sr. PGA 



Ninja Turtles 



Up Close 



NInia Turtles 



*** "School f/es (1992) Brendan Fraser 



»•»'/; T^e Petrifie d Forest 
Hey Dude (R)|Gut8 



** Getting Married' (1978, Comedy) Richard Thomas. 



(1936) 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



PG-13 q 



7:00 



7:30 



8:00 



8:30 



** 



Big Girls Pont Cry. They Get Even (1992) PG q 



Hard Copy q 



Jeopardy! q 



Copsq 



CBS News 



Roseanne g 



Jeopardy! q 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



AmJoumal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



9:00 



9:30 



** "To Protect and Serve 



Matlock: The Final Affair {m3, Mystery) Andy Griffith. 



Mad- You I Wings g 



In the Heat of the Night q 



In the Heat of the Night q 



Simpsons q 



Mad-You 



**'/;' Cleopatra Jones ( 1 973) PG 



Sinbad q 



Wings g 



Short Sub. 



Seinfeld g iFrasierq 



Eye to Eye (In Stereo) q 



Eye to Eye (In Stereo) q 



In Color 



Seinfeld g 



Herman 



Frasier q 



10:00 



1992) R I Comedy Jam 



10:30 



Primetime Live q 



Super Comedy 



Angel Falls (In Stereo) q 



Angel Falls (lii Stereo) g 



Mama 



Mama 



Super Comedy 



**'/; "Happy New /ear (1987) Peter Falk PG' 



Sportscenter [College Football: Virginia at Georgia Tech From Atlanta. (Live! 



MacGyver ' ' Runners q I Mur<ter. She Wrote g 



** 



"Class Act (1992) Christopher Reid 'PG-13' g 



** 3 Ninias 



Looney 



Sh^4w£_ 



(1992) Victor Wong. PG q 
Looney |Bullwinkle~^ 



Unsolved Mysteries 



*** 



"White Palace (1990, Drama) Susan Sarandon. q 



*** 



*V; Hudson Hawk" (1991) Bruce Willis 



■Alien 3 (1992) Sigourney Weaver. R' q 



Bob Newhart Bob Newhart 



L.A. Uw 



Bob Newhart 



Boxing 



Bob Newhart 



11:00 



11:30 



Inside the NFL q 



News g 



News 



News 



News g 



Cheers g iNightlineq 



12:00 



Satan 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In Stereo) g 



Edition 



Chevy Chase (In Stereo) q 



Late Show g 



Love Con. 



News g {Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



** 



"Breakout ' [Wb) Charles Bronson. 



Baseball I Sportscenter 



Quantum Leap (In Stereo) lOdd Couple 



*'/2 "Sleepwalkers" (1992) Brian Krause. 



"Prey of the Chameleon' 



Bob Newhart I Bob Newhart 



«* 



'Go Toward the Light" (1986) Linda Hamilton. 



(1992) R' 



Bob Newhart 



*V; '/^mbrf/on (1991) R 



Bob Newhart 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Bob Newhart 



Mysteries 



FRIDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 17. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



4:00 



(3:00) 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



*** "And the Band Played On' (1993, Drama) Matthew l^odine q 



Edition 



Oprah Winfrey g 



[Cheers g 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry 



Copsi 



Tiny Toon 



Cur. Affair 



(3 00) Sylvester (1985) 



Newsg 



Cheers q 



Newsq 



News 



Geraldo 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Animaniacs [Batman q 



Newsq 



Newsq 



News 



News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsg 



Full House q 



News q 



**"2 "Happy New Year'OW) PG' 



PGA Golf: Hardee s Classic ■- Second Round (Live) 



Pyramid 



Fav. Films 



Pyramid I Parker Lewis [Facts of Life 



'Summer Rental (1985) Jot^n Candy. 



The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) q 



Muppets [ Crazy Kids I Hey Dude ( R ) [ Guts 



26 ** '2 In Love With an Older Woman (1982) John Ritter 



YeartMok 



Ninja Turtles 



Roseanne g 



NBC News 



Short Sub. 



Up Close 



Ninja Turtles 



7:00 



7:30 



Inside the NFL (R) g 



Hard Copy g 



Jeopardy! g 



Copsg 



CBS News 



Roseanne g 



Jeopardy! g 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Manied.. 



Am.Joumal 



Manied.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



** '" Brain Donors' (1992) John Turturro. 



Family 



TSai Preview [Step by Step 



9:30 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



•** 



Awakening Land (R) (In Stereo) (Part 3 of 3) g 



Mr. Cooper 



My Cousin Wnny" (1992, Comedy) Joe Pesci. R' 



G. Palace TBA 



[ The Building [Boysq 



20/20 g 



Trade Winds (In Stereo) q 



Major League Baseball: Pittsburgh Pirates at St. Louis Cardinals. (Live) 



Picket Fences (In Stereo) q 



Brisco County, Jr. 



I X-Files ' ' Deep Throat' ' q I Mama 



Mama 



Awakening Land (R) (In Stereo) (Part 3 of 3) q 



Ttrade Winds (In Stereo) q 



»*• "Tim (1979, Drama) Piper Laurie, Mel Gibson 'NR |**» "Guns at Batasi (1964) Richard Atteriborough 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



11:30 



Sanders 



Cheers g 



12:00 



Comedy Jam 



Nightline q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In Stereo) q 



Edition 



Chevy Chase Al Franken. g 



Late Show g 



Love Con. 



News g [Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



*»V; ffo//ifes"(1980) Roger Moore. PG' 



Sportscenter [Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



Case Closed g 



"Cool World" (1992, Fantasy) Kim Basinger. 'PG-13' 



** Hes My 



What You Do 



G<r/' (1987, Comedy) T.K. Carter. PG-13' 



Supermarket 



Looney 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



BuHwtnkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced (Live) 



Murder, She Wrote g [*** "Jack's Back (1988, f^ystery) James Spader. |*V2 Once Bitten' (1985) Lauren Hutton 



*** "Mediterraneo (1991) Diego Abatantuono. R 



»'/; "The Human Shield (1992) R 



Bob Newhart Bob Newhart 



L.A. Law 



Bob Newhart 



Jokers 



Bob Newhart 



**'/; "Unlawful Entry " (1992) Kul Russell. R' g 



"Ulterior" 



** 



"The Wrong Man" (1993. Drama) R 



Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart 



Bob Newhart 



*** 



"Great Balls o/F/re' (1989, Drama) Dennis Quaid, Winona Ryder. 



"Xtro 2: 2nd Encounter 



Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart 



Unsolved Mysteries 



SATURDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 18, 1993 I 




4:00 1 4:30 


5:00 


5:30 [ 6:00 1 6:30 [ 7:00 [ 7:30 


8:00 [ 8:30 [ 9:00 | 9:30 


10:00 


10:30 


11:00 [ 11:30 12:00 1 


2 


(3 30) Buffy Slayer 


League 


*** "A League of Their Own (1992, Comedy) Geena Davis PG g 


**V2 Single White Fema/e' (1992) Bridget Fonda. 'R' q 


Dream On q | Crypt Tales 


*** "Lethal Weapon 3" (1992) R' q I 


4 


College Football: Regional Coverage 


Newsg 


Home's 


♦•''■2 "Joe Versus the Volcano (1990) Tom Hanl<s. q 


Commish (R) 


In Stereo) q 


News g [Golden Girts 


Empty Nest 1 


6 


College Football [Preview of the Ryder Cup 


News 


NBC News 


Empty Nest 


Wh. Fortune 


Miss America 


Mommies q [Cafe Ame. 


Miss America Pageant (In Stereo Live) g 


News 


7 


(12 GO) College Football: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 


News 


CBS News 


Untouchables (In Stereo) q 


Medicine Woman 


In the Heat of the Night (In Stereo) g 


News 


Star Trek: Deep Space 9 


8 


Major League Baseball: Req 


lonal Coverage 


News g 


CBS News 


Crusaders 


Major League Baseball: Pittsburgh Pirates at St Louis Cardinals. (Live) 


Newsg 


Untouchables (In Stereo) q 


10 


(3:00) All the Right Moves ' 


American Gladiators 


Star Trek: Next Gener. 


Star Trek: Deep Space 9 


Cops g Cops (R) g 


Front Page (In Stereo) q Comic Strip: Late Night 


Arsenic Hall (In Stereo) g 


Music 1 


11 


College Football 


Preview of the Ryder Cup 


News q jNBC News 


Jeopardy! q |Wh. Fortune 


Miss America 


Mommies q jCafe Ame. Miss America Pageant (In Stereo Live) g 


News 


14 


(3:00) Gunsat Batasi 


♦♦'2 ffo/Aes (1980, Adventure) Roger Moore. PG 


♦ •'■2 "Amazing Grace and Chuck (1987. Drama) PG' 


**'/? The Valachi Papers 0972) Charles Bronson. PG [Short Sub. [•••V2 "Brazil" (1985) R' 1 


17 


Horse Racing (Live) 


PGA Golf: Hardee's Classic 


Sportscenter 


Football College Football: Florida State at North Carolina (Live) [College Football: Colorado at Stanford (Live) 1 


18 


** Cameron s Closet (1987, Horror) Cotter Smith j Swamp 


Beyond 


Case Closed q 


*♦ "Off Limits ' {^988, Drama) Willem Dafoe. (In Stereo) 


Silk Stalkings Witness q [*V2 "My fVloms a Werewolf (1988) | 


21 


(3.30) Rabbit Test (WS) ♦' 2 "C/uO Fed' (1990) Judy Landers. 


"Naked Gun 2 1/2: Fear 


**V2 X2"(1992, Adventure) Michael Biehn, R' q 


*'2 "No Safe Haven (1989, Drama) R' 


Frame-Up II " \ 


22 


(3:30) *♦*' 2 Dead Poets Society (1989) 


** Beaches " {^%8, Drama 


) Bette Midler. (In Stereo) PG-13 q 


*♦'/? Diggstown (1992) James Woods, 


Boxing 


* "Future K;c/( (1991, Science Fiction) R' 


Red Shoe 


Fallen 


25 


Can't on TV Arcade | Double Dare 


Wild Side 


Salute [Legends Doug jRugrats 


Clarissa [Roundhouse Ren-Stimpy 


Rocko's Life 


Bob Newhart 


Bob Newhart 


Bob Newhart 


Bob Newhart 


Bob Newhart 


.,.J.6-. 


♦ ♦'r In the Spirit" (1990) Mario Thomas, Elaine Mav- 


*** Hands at a Stranger (1987) Armand Assante, 


*♦♦ Hands at a Stranger (1987) Armand Assante, 


Hidden 


Hidden 


Unsolved Mysteries 


China Beach 



SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEIMBER 19, 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



IB 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(230) 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



Mom and Dad Save the World (1992) ! 



Movie 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



*»'2 "Waynes World" (1992) Mike Myers. 'PG-13 



NFL Football: Houston Oilers at San Diego Chargers. (Live) 



News g [ABC News 



TBA 



To Be Announced 



• [Design. W. [CBS News 



NFL Football Atlanta Falcons at San Francisco 49ers From Candlestick Park, (Live) 



*** Going in Style (1979, Comedy) George Burns, Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



Fifth Quarter Suspect [Rescue 911 [Rescue 911 [News 



(2:30) 



♦ ♦''2 



"The Valachi Papers (1972) Charles Bronson, PG 



(3:30) PGA Golf: Hardee's Classic - Final Fjound, (Live) 



(3 00) *»* "White Palace [Ten of Us [Two Dads 



*'2 



(3:00) 



Beastmaster 2 Through the Portal of Time (1991) 



Can't on TV Arcade 



Double Dare Freshmen 



Jeopardy! g 



Short Sub. 



Baseball Tonight 



Two Dads Two Dads 



Videos 



Am. Funniest 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



60 Minutes q 



60 Minutes : 



Townsend Television q 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) [Seaquest DSV (In Stereo) 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



10:00 



»*'^2 "Batman Returns (1992. Adventure) Michael Keaton, 'PG-13 q I** "Boomerang (1992, Comedy) Eddie Murphy, R' q 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



Emmy Awards (In Stereo Live) q 



Seaquest DSV (In Stereo) [••"2 "Quigley Down Under" (1990) Tom Selleck, g 



It Had to Be *♦*'; The Hunt for Red October (1990, Adventure) Sean Connery, q 



It Had to Be 



***'2 



The, Hunt for Red October (1990, Adventure) Sean Connery q 



Martin q [Living Single iMarried... [Dearest [Star Trek: Next Gener. 



*• 



"Authori Author' " {:982 Comedy) Al Pacino. PG 



**''? "Quigley Down Under' (1990) Tom Selleck. q 



News g 



News 



News 



News q 



Paid Prog. 



News 



• **'2 



NFL Primetime 



[Major League Baseball: New York Mets at Atlanta Braves. (Live) 



The Adventures of Baron f^unchausen (1989) John Neville 



*** 



Ready or Not Chris Cross **'/? 'Late for Dinner (1991) PG 



WarGames" {^%3) Matthew Broderick. PG 



"Rubdown' (1993, Drama) Jack Coleman. (In Stereo) q [Case Closed (R) g 



**'7 



** 



Better Off Dead (1993, Drama) Mare Wlnningham 



Rocko's Life [Legends 



Grand Canyon ' {^9S^ . Drama) Danny Glover. R' 



** '"Life Stinks' (1991, Comedy) Mel Brooks, 'PG-13' •** "Honeymoon m Vegas ' (1992) g Fallen 



You Afraid? Roundhouse 



»* "The Last Prostitute" (1991) Sonia Braga, 



Nick News Bob Newhart Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) q 



Cheers 1 



Night Court 



Siskel 



Murphy B. 



Paid Prog. 



Rescue 911 [Suspect 



Dear John ; 



Cheers q 



Murphy B. 



Lifestyles 



FYI Pitt. 



Bloodhounds 



Sportscenter 



Silk Stalkings Witness q 



NFL 



Hollywood 



** "Time Runner" (1992) Mark Hamill. 'R [ Dark Obsession (1989) 



**V2 "Punchline ' {1988, Comedy-Drama) Sally Field. 



Bob Newhart Bob Newhart 



Comics in Search 



** "Scanners III: The Takeover (1992) 



Bob Newhart Bob Newhart 



Speciality Update 



Bob Newhart 



Ph^sici8ns_ 



MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 20. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(3:00) 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



*V; "Caddyshack IT" (1988, Comedy) Jaci<ie Mason. PG 



Edition 



Oprah Winfrey q 



[Cheers g 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry 



Cops; 



(2:30) 



Max Out (R) 



Pyramid 



(2,30) 



Animaniacs 



Cur. Affair 



Short Sub. 



Dream Lg. 



Pyramid 



Newsg 



Coach q 



Newsq 



News 



Geraldo 



News g 



News 



News 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



** "Only Voo "(1992) Andrew McCarthy 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Tiny Toon [Batman q 



Newsq 



News q 



Full House q 



News I 



Roseanne g 



NBC News 



** "Author! Author^ {1982, 



Yearbook 



Pariter Lewis 



*♦ 



"Nate and Hayes (1983 



Max Out 



Facts of Life 



PG 



The Karate Kid Part W ' (1989) Ralph Macchio PG 



Comedy) Al Pacino PG 



Th'breds 



Ninja Turtles 



Up Close 



Ninja Turtles 



Hard Copy g 



Jeopardy! q 



Copsq 



CBS News 



Roseanne q 



Jeopardy! g 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



Am.Joumal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



AmitYville 1992: Its About r<me" (1992) 



Day Oneg 



Fresh Prince of Bel-Air q 



Shade 



Shade 



Dave's 



Dave's 



9:30 



10:00 



10:30 



*V2 "Mikey" {1991) Brian Bonsall. R' 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



**V2 "Dying Young" (1991) Julia Roberts. 



NFL Football: Denver Broncos at Kansas City Chiefs. From Arrowhead Stadium, q [News q 



"Star (1993, Drama) Jennie Garth, Ted Wass. q 



Murphy B. 



"Based on an Untrue Story 



Murphy B. 



Love & War 



Love & War 



Fresh Prince of Bel-Air q 



**V; "Young 



Sportscenter 



Guns of Texas (1962) James Mitchum. 



Major Dad ! 



NFL Prime Monday 



Wings q 



•* 



Coach" (1978. Comedy) Cathy Lee Crosby, PG 



*•* "The Band Wagon (1953. Musical) Fred Astaire, 



(2 00) Nicktoonathon 



Rocko's Life [Nicktoonathon A cartoon marathon 



Rocko's Life 



*« Ski Lift to Death (1978, Suspense) Howard Duff [Supermariiet [Shop-Drop [Unsolved Mysteries 



Case Closed q 



(1993) Morgan Fairchild. q 



Northern Exposure q 



Northern Exposure q 



Mama 



[Mama 



"Star" (1993. Drama) Jennie Garth, Ted Wass. q 



*»'/; "The Fortune {1975, Comedy) PG' [Short Sub. 



Bodybuilding: USA Championships. 



WWF: Monday Night Raw 



*** 



"Innerspace (1987) Dennis Quaid PG q 



** "Lady Beware (1987, Suspense) Diane Lane R 



Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart 



L.A. Law "LA. Lawless 



Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) q 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Late Show (In Stereo) q 



Edition 



Chevy Chase (In Stereo) q 



Late Show g 



Love Con. 



News g [Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



*** "/ Deal in Danger' (1966, Suspense) 



Baseball 



Major Dad g 



'^2 "Death Ring {1992) Mike Norris. R' 



Sportscenter 



Wings q [Odd Couple 



Where Sleepi 



The Player" {1992, Satire) Tim Robbins. R' g 



Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart 



♦ •'7 "In the Arms of a Killer " (1992) Jaclyn Smith. 



Bob Newhart [Bob Newhart 



Unsolved Mysteries 



•ng Dogs Lie' 



Altman 



Bob Newhart 



Mysteries 



TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 21. 1993 1 




4:00 1 4:30 [ 5:00 [ 5:30 


6:00 1 6:30 [ 7:00 7:30 


8:00 8:30 | 9:00 [ 9:30 


10:00 [ 10:30 [ 11:00 


11:30 [ 12:00 


2 


** High Ice {1980. Adventure) David Janssen 


♦** "The Buddy Holly Story" (1978) Gary Busey PG 


♦♦V2 "Single White Female (1992) Bridget Fonda R q 


**V2 "Quick {1993, Drama) Ten Polo R 


The Untouchables {1967) 


4 


Donahue (In Stereo) g 


Newsq 


Newsq 


Newsg 


ABC News 


Hard Copy q 


Ent. Tonight 


Full House q 


Phenom q 


Roseanne q 


Coach q 


NYPD Blue Pilot q 


Newsg 


Cheers q Nightline q 


6 


Edition Cheers g 


Coach q 


News 


News 


NBC News 


Jeopardy! q 


Wh. Fortune 


Saved-Bell 


Getting By q 


Larroquette 


Second Half 


Dateline q 


News 


Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 


7 


Oprah Winfrey q 


Geraldo 


News 


CBS News 


Copsq 


Married... 


Rescue 911 (In Stereo) q 


Donate and Daughter" (1993. Drama) Charles Bronson " 


News 


Late Show Came Fisher q 


8 


Les Brown 


Oprah Winfrey q 


News g 


CBS News 


Am.Joumal 


Rescue 911 (In Stereo) q 


"Donate and Daughter (1993. Drama) Charles Bronson. 


Newsg 


Edition 


Late Show q 


10 


Tom-Jerry 


Animaniacs 


Tiny Toon [ Batman q 


Full House q 


Roseanne q 


Roseanne q 


Married... 


Rocq 


Bakersfield 


America's Most Wanted q 


Mama [Mama 


Chevy Chase Rita Rudner. 


Love Con. 


11 


Copsq 


Cur. Affair 


Newsq 


Newsq 


NBC News 


Jeopardy! q 


Wh. Fortune 


Saved-Bell 


Getting By q 


Larroquette Second Half 


Dateline q 


News g [Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 


14 


(300) 


Short Sub. 


**'2 The Big Gamble {1981) Stephen Boyd, 


♦ **'2 A Room With a View {198(>. Drama) NR 


♦*''2 "A Flea in Her Ear (1968, Comedy) Rex Harrison. 


♦*'/? "Honkytonk Man (1982) PG 


17 


Max Out (R) 


Dream Lg. 


Yeart)ook 


Max Out 


NBA Today 


Up Close 


Sportscenter Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced, (Live) [Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced (Live) I 


18 


Pyramid 


Pyramid 


Part(er Lewis 


Facts of Life 


Ninja Turtles 


Ninja Turtles 


Major Dad q Wings q 


Murder, She Wrote q [Boxing: Benny Amparo vs Tony Green. (Live) [Major Dad q [Wings q 


Odd Couple | 


• 21 


(2 45) Adventures 


i* How 1 Got Into College (1989)5 


*■ 2 Let It Ride (1989) Richard Dreyfuss 


♦♦* South Central {1992. Drama) Glenn Plummer R \**\'2 "Tightrope (1984, Suspense) Clint Eastwood. R 


YoungGun \ 


22 


(2 30) The Adventures of Robm Hood ' (1938] g 


♦ '2 Star Knic 


^ht (1986, Fantasy) Harvey Keitel PG-13 


♦'2 The Human Shield (1992) R 


Delta Force 3 The Killing Game (1991) *♦ 'The Wrong Man (1993, Drama) R 1 


25 


Muppets 


Crazy Kids [Hey Dude (R)[Guts 


What You Do 


Looney 


Looney [Bullwinkle 


Partridge Get Smart 


Ora^net 


Bob Newhart [M.T. Moore |M.T. Moore Van Dyke 


Lucy Show [A. Hitchcock 1 


26 


♦' 2 Trouble in Paradise (1989. Comedy) Raguel Welch 


Supermaricet 


Shop-Drop 


Unsolved Mysteries 


L.A. Law 


♦* "Once Is Not Enough {197b, Drama) Kirk Douglas, Alexis Smith. 


Unsolved Mysteries 1 



WEDNESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 22. 1993 1 




4:00 


4:30 [ 5:00 [ 5:30 


6:00 [ 6:30 [ 7:00 1 7:30 


8:00 1 8:30 [ 9:00 [ 9:30 


10:00 


10:30 


11:00 


11:30 [ 12:00 


2 


(215) 


♦♦* Beetleiuice (1988) Michael Keaton 


**"2 SWveste/- (1985) Richard Farnswortfi PG q 


♦♦Vj The Jewel of the Nile (1985) Kathleen Turner g 


Sanders 


Dream On q 


Crypt Tales 


And the Band Played On 


4 


DonatHie (In Stereo) q 


Newsg 


Newsq 


Newsg 


ABC News 


Hard Copy q 


Ent Tonight 


Thea g Joe's Life q 


Home Imp [Grace Under 


Moon Over Miami q 


Newsg 


Cheers g [Nightline q 


6 


Edition [Cheers q 


Coach q 


News 


News 


NBC News 


Jeopardy! q 


Wh. Fortune 


Unsolved Mysteries g 


Now-T. Brokaw & K. Counc 


Law & Order (In Stereo) q 


News 


Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 


7 


Oprah Winfrey g 


Geraklo 


News 


CBS News 


Copsq 


Married... 


Larry 


TaM Hopes q 


To Be Announced 


48 Hours (In Stereo) q 


News 


Late Show (In Stereo) q 


8 


Les Brown 


Oprah Winfret 


1Q 


News g 


CBS News 


Am.Joumal 


Larry 


Tall Hopes q 


To Be Announced 


48 Hours (In Stereo) g 


News g 


Edition 


Late Show g 1 


10 


Tom- Jerry 1 Animaniacs 


Tiny Toon 


Batman q 


Full House q 


Roseanne q 


Roseanne q 


Married... 


Beverty Hills, 90210 g 


Melrose Place Revenge 


Mama [Mama 


Chevy Chase Sinbad. g 


Love Con. j 


11 


Cops q Cur. Affair 


Newsq 


Newsg 


NBC News 


Jeopardy! q 


Wh. Fortune 


Unsolved Mysteries g 


Now-T. Brokaw & K. Couric 


Law & Order (In Stereo) q 


Newsg 


Tonight Show (In Stereo) c 1 


14 


(3 00) Honkytonk Man 


Short Sub. 


*♦'/? Cleopatra Jones (1973) PG 


**' 2 Legend (1985, Fantasy) Tom Cruise PG 


♦ ♦♦''2 The Verdict (1982, Drama) Paul Newman (In Stereo) R' 


Tess-Storm \ 


17 


Max Out (R) 


Dream Lg. 


NFL Yrt)k. 


Max Out 


Inside PGA 


Up Close 


Sportscenter 


Major League Baseball Teams to Be Announced (Live) [BasebaN 


Sportscenter 


Sports 


18 


Pyramid 


Pyramid 


Partier Lewis 


Facts of Life 


Ninja Turtles 


Ninja Turtles 


Major Dad 


Wings q 


Murder, She Wrote q 1 The Substitute (1993, Suspense) Amanda Donohoe q 


MaK>r Dad g [Wings g 


Odd Couple 


21 


(3 00) 


*♦ Rustlers Rhapsody (1985) PG q 


** The Last Dragon (1985 Drama) Taimak PG 13 g 


** "Sunset Grill (1992, Suspense) Peter Weller R 


*'2 Solar Crisis {1990) Tim Mafheson PG-IO' g 


Alien 3 R 


22 


(3 35) *♦♦ Public Enemy 


Monkey 


♦ ♦♦ Crimes and Misdemeanors (1989) Martin Landau 


Stories 


*t "Waxwork If Lost in Time (1992) Zach Galligan R 


Jokers 


When a Stranger Calls Back (1993) 


Ulterior 


25 


Muppets [Crazy Kids 


Hey Dude (R) 


Guts 


What You Do 


Looney 


Looney 


Bullwinkle 


Partridge [Get Smart 


Dragnet [Bob Newhart 


M.T. Moore 


M.T Moore [Van Dyke 


Lucy Show 


A. Hitchcock 


26 


♦ ♦• Rage (1980 Drama) David Soul 


Supermartiet 


Shop-Drop 


Unsolved Mys 


leries 


L.A. Law Zo Long 


♦ ♦♦ Claras Heart (1988 Drama) Whoopi Goldberg 


Unsolved Mysteries 1 



The Clarion Call - 9-16-93- Page 11 



FEAf¥R^E^ 




Activities Day is full of events, exhibits and concerts 

Pittsburgh group 'The Clarks' and alternative group 'Stinging Rain' make special appearance 



by John Martinec 
Features Writer 



The University Activities 
Board will bring the rock-n-roll 
sound.s of The Clark.s and the 
alternative music of Stinging 
Rain to Clarion as part of 
Activities Day. This outdoor 
concert will be held on Sunday, 
September 19 on the Geminell 
Complex stage from 2-4 p.m. 

The Clarks are one of 
Pittsburgh's major bands and can 
be heard on Pittsburgh radio 
station WOVE on a regular 
basis. The four-member band 
includes Scott Blasey on vocals 
and guitar, Robert James on 
guitar and vocals, Greg Joseph 
on brass and the mandolin, and 
Dave Minarik on drums and 
vocals. 

During their six years together, 
The Clarks have produced two 
full-length releases. The first, 
•TU Tell You What Man. . ." sold 
over 2,100 CDs, cassettes, and 




It's time to 'Meet the Greeks' 



public affairs photo 
The Clarks, a famous band from the heart of Pittsburgh, will make their appearance during 
Activities Day on Sunday, September 19 at 2 p.m. on the Gemmell Complex outdoor stage. 



albums. Other singles charted 
on college radio from Verinoni to 
California. 

Stinging Rain is on tour to 
promote the relea.se of its third 
album "Burning Light." 
Stinging Rain has a large 
regional following in the 
northeast United States. Their 
original sound and insightful 
lyrics have been given rave 
reviews and can be heard at 
many colleges, nightclubs, and 
over radio airwaves. 

This concert is a must to .see, 
especially since it is free and 
open to the public. So come and 
enjoy! 

UAB Special Event 

Big Surf 

Drive-In Movie 

"Point of No Return" 

starring Bridgett Fonda 

Sunday. Sept. 19 

8 p.m. (or dark) 

Genvnell outdoor stage 



by Toni Ross 
Features Writer 



The Clarion University Greeks 
will be kicking off the rush 
season once again at "Meet the 
Greeks" during Activities Day 
on Sunday, September 19 from 
2-4 p.m. outside Gemmell 
Complex. 

"Meet the Greeks" sives all 
interested men and women on 
campus the opportunity to meet 
members from all of the Greek 
organizations. 

For the sororities, the day 
marks the beginning of informal 
rush. Women interested in 
joining one of the ten national 
sororities will be able to get 
information on each sorority 
ru.sh parly schedule. This year, a 
"Round Robin" time schedule 
will be in elfect so rushees may 
attend more dian one party. 

To be eligible to rush a 
sorority, women must have 
received at least a 2.0 the 
previous semester and be in good 
academic standing with the 
university. First semester 
freshmen are not allowed to 
pledge, however, they are 



f jrs.'sViVi »>e,V.i''J 



welcome to go through rush to 
find out about sororities they 
would like to pledge in future 
semesters. 

The Panhellenic Council, 
governing body of the sororities, 
will hold an informational 
work.shop tonight at 8 p.m. in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. 
Members of Panhel will be on 
hand to answer any questions 
about informal sorority rush. 

Prateniity rush also begins the 
week of Activities Day. All men 
interested in pledging one of the 
national fraternities will also be 
able to get infonnation from the 
fraternities during "Meet the 
Greeks," or from signs around 
campus. 

Requirements for fraternities 
include at least a 2.0 G.PA from 
the previous semester and in 
good standing with the 
university. First semester 
freshmen are not allowed to 
pledge. 

Being a member of a Greek 
organization can be a fun and 
exciting experience. If you are 
interested, "Meet the Greek.s" on 
Sunday and good luck through 
\ii\\ Rush PW. 



p.vti.'j.n \.'K-,is' I'-i-t-.o w '.^f,^s c 6'fc"' 




public affairs photo 
Alternative music group Stinging Rain will entertain the .students at Clarion University with their 
original sound and insightful lyrics during Activities Day this Sunday. This group has just released 
its third album and is currently on tour in the northeastern United States. 



W^'^ 



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Page 12 - The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 



President Reinhard now serving on ''top'' NCAA council 



n e \\ s 



{* 



V 



Ihe Clarion Call - 9-16-93 - Page 13 



by Ron Santillo 
Features Writer 



Clarion University President 
Diane K. Reinhard is curiently 
serving as a Division II 
representative for the very 
prestigious National Collegiate 
Athletie Association (NCAA) 
council. 

The NCAA Council is 
comprised of 44 elected members 
and an ex -officio president and 
secretary. Council members 
include 22 from NCAA Division 
I, 11 from NCAA Division II, and 
11 from NCAA Division III. 
Reinhard was elected for a four 
year term from a slate of 
candidates at January's annual 
convention. Only six college and 
university presidents currently 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
President Reinhard now .serves 
for the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association (NCAA). 



serve on the board. 

The council is the top elected 
b(xly of the NCAA and is charged 
with deciding NCAA policy 
between annual conventions, 
including interpretation of rules 
and necessary decisions on policy 
matters. Annual conventions tiike 
place the second full week of 
January and rules iuc discu.ssed 
on all recognized Olympic level 
sports on the Division I, II jind 111 
level. 

"Representation on this 
important committee will allow 
me to contribute in efforts to 
improve the overall quality of 
intercollegiate athletic programs 
and enhance my knowledge of 
issues such as cost containment 
and social equity questions facing 
the NCAA and the Pennsylvania 



Slate Athletic Conference 
(PSAC), where I also serve on the 
executive committee of die board 
of directors," said Reinhard. 

rhe three main priorities on the 
council's agenda are academic 
progress, gender equity and cost 
containment. Academic progress, 
which is indeed die fust priority 
of die council, deals with the fact 
diat die athletes mu.st have ample 
time for accomplishments as 
students. Gender equity deals 
with the equal opportunity for 
men and women in college, 
including equal scholarship 
opportunity md enough interest in 
the sport to have constant 
participation. Cost containment, 
the third main issue discussed by 
the council, deals with the 
expenses of each athletic 



program. Cost containment 
issues deal with what is being 
spent and what expenses can be 
reduced. 

In addition to the rules 
committee, the NCAA has 
various other committees in order 
to control the flow of 
intercollegiate sports. Such 
committees include the 
infractions committee, who deal 
mainly wiUi disciplinary actions, 
and the President's committee, 
who work closely with the 
council in voting on rules and 
regulations. 

Besides serving on the NCAA 
and PSAC executive committees. 
Reinhard is a member of the 
PSAC's Gender Equity Task 
Force. 



Sexual Assault: Now is the time to become aware of the dangers 



by Melissa J. Caraway 
Features Writer 

As our third week of classes 
comes to an end, die students of 
Clarion University begin to think 
about the important topics of 
collegiate life, such as grades, 
ALF week and, for some of us, 
graduation. One subject dial is 
rarely thought of (or at least not 
as much as it should be) is 
campus safety. In the light of 
recent events occurring on 
campus, there is no better time 
than now to be awcU"c. 

Sunday, September P). begins 
Sexual ,^ssault Awiireness Week. 



I know from listening to female 
students talk about what a shame 
it is that a young woman was 
attacked on campus only two 
weeks ago, (and then watching 
those students walk home in the 
dark from die library or a party), 
that being assaulted is the last 
diing on Uieir minds. 

I don't know if the choice to 
walk around alone on a fairly lit 
cjunpus wiUi only one emergency 
phone located in Ihu-vey Hall, is 
based on courage or stupidity. 
One fact I do know is that you 
and I were not die cho.sen victim. 
That night was simply a matter of 
fate. Fm not so comfortable widi 



diese odds. 

All next week. Students 
TogeUier Against Rape (STAR) is 
sponsoring a series of programs 
and educational activities 
designed to take an honest 
approach to subjects such as date 
rape and die portrayal of women 
in die media. 

On September 21, the 
Bloomsburg Players will give a 
dramatic performance invidng die 
audience to participate by a.sking 
questions, followed by a 
workshop focusing on sexual 
assault dirough role playing. 

Wednesday, September 22, is 
highlighted by the dale rape 



! Riverhill Meat and Seafood 



video, "Playing Uie Game," and a 
discussion led by Dr. Janice 
Grigsby, die assistant professor of 
counseling services, and Holly 
Johnson, die president of STAR. 
This event will be held in 248 
Gemmell. 

Another discussion and video, 
"Dreiimworlds," will be shown in 
250 Gemmell on Thursday, 
September 23. The follow-up 
discussion, led by Dr. Mary Jo 
Reef, will address the negative 
and damaging representations of 
women in music videos. 

All of the activities, which 
include an organizational bootli at 
Activities Day, are coordinated by 
S lAR's secretiu-y Rhonda Wirfel, 
and under the direction of vice 
president and treasurer of STAR, 
Cindy Hultz. 

According to Deb King, 
STAR'S advisor and operator of 



the Women's Study Center in 
Harvey Hall, "I would like to see 
students empowering themselves 
to change their environment for 
reasons of salety, and to be able to 
use the student voice for things 
other than just changing the 
library hours." 

If diere are any quesUons about 
next week's activities or STAR, 
you are urged to call Uie Women's 
Studies Center at 226-2720, or 
stop by its kx:ation on the second 
floor in Harvey Hall. 



There will also be an 
Acquaintance Rape 
Dramatics program In the 
Chapel on Tiiesday, Sept. 
21 at 7 p.m. Admission is 
free. 



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by Chuck Shepherd 



-Mark Wiegel, 33, was arrested 
in Salem, New Hampshire, in 
May after mall security guards 
confiscated a video camera 
hidden in a shoe box in his bag. 
Wiegel allegedly would set the 
bag down at a woman's feel with 
the lens pointed upward so that 
he could videotape up the 
woman's dress. 

-A well-dressed man in his 40s 
fled after an incident in February 
at a western wear store in 
Omaha, Nebraska. According to 
a clerk, the man asked for a 
horse harness for a costume 
party and went into a dressing 
room to put it on. He emerged a 
short time later, flung the door 
open and ran around the store 
wearing only his undershorts and 



the harness. After a few 
minutes, he quietly changed back 
into his business suit, told the 
clerk he would be back with his 
wife to buy the harness, and left. 

-In May, Minneapolis judge 
Richard Solum dropped 
prostitution charges against 
Jacqueline Reina, aka "Mistress 
Ayesha," who was discovered by 
police during a raid on her 
chambers standing beside a 
naked client who was strapped to 
a sawhorse and on whose 
genitals she had placed 16 
clothespins. Reasoned Judge 
Solum, Reina herself was not 
responding to a sexual impulse 
from the act and therefore could 
not be guilty of prostitution. 
(She was found guilty of running 
a disorderly house.) 

-State police in East St. Louis, 



Illinois, arrested Eddie Givens, 
36, during a routine traffic stop 
and charged him with 
impersonating a police officer 
after he tried to avoid chftfges by 
presenting a badge. They also 
announced that Givens was a 
suspect in several area incidents 
in which a man claiming to be a 
police officer stopped female 
motorists and asked to suck their 
toes. 

-Three weeks apart in March, a 
High Point, North Carolina, 
couple and a Clyde, Ohio couple 
reported that someone had stolen 
approximately 50 recently used 
cloth diapers from their front 
porch and garage, respectively, 
before the diaper service showed 
up. No other items were taken. 

-On Good Friday this year on 
his way from Hillsdale, 



Michigan, to Clinton, Michigan, 
Christopher Ray Tirb drove off 
the road into a signpost, then a 
while later swerved acrt>ss the 
center line and sideswiped 
another car, then a while later 
rear-ended a truck, which 
necessitated a call for an 
ambulance for him. En route to 
the hospital, the ambulance 
carrying Tirb was hit by another 
car. 

-Robert Lord, 42, was rescued 
after eight hours afloat without a 
life jacket in the chilly and 
turbulent Strait of Georgia, 
between Vancouver Island and 
the Canada mainland in July. He 
had fallen off a ferry boat when 
he leaned too far out a window 
while vomiting. 

-Two California physicians, 
co-authoring a piece in the 
March 1993 issue of the Journal 
of Forensic Sciences, reported on 
the deaths of two men who 
suffered mishaps while 
suspended naked on construction 
vehicles' hydraulic shovels. The 
doctors reported both men were 



attempting to heighten sexual 
gratification, but that one went a 
little too far and asphyxiated, 
and the other was accidentally 
fatally pinned to the ground by 
the shovel while dressed in 
women's clothes. 

-David Richardson, 19. 
arrested in a Gadsden, Alakuna, 
convenience store in August and 
charged with robbery, told police 
that he had made no holdup 
demand and in fact was only 
there to buy a few things. Police 
entered the store to find 
Richard.son standing in the back, 
having just put a pair of 
pantyhose over his face and 
socks over his hands and 
carrying a butcher knile in his 
pocket. At the first sign of the 
police, Richardson, still in 
pantyhose, grabbed an item off 
the shelf and acted as if he were 
shopping. 



-(c) 1993 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



a - - -ouiic pimcc in ciiM oi. i^uuis, ms ■way iiuiu niiiaudic, 

i Volunteers needed to help conserve the environment 



by Anji Brown 
Features Writer 



The word "conservation" 
means different things to 
different people. Some simply 
make it part of their daily routine 
and others consider it their 
lifetime job. 

Sonya Hafer, a freshman here 
at Clarion University, believes if 
we do everyday chores such as 
recycling ;uid disposing of waste 
properly, we are conserving the 
earth's resources. 

Dr. Konitzky, Professor of 
Anthropology, defines 



conservation as a preserving of 
the environment. "Essentially 
most people try to conserve the 
environment," Konitzky 
believes. 

It is true that people of the 
1990s are starting to wake up 
and realize that the earth's 
resources me slowly dwindling, 
and we must make an effort to 
help conserve what we have left. 
This year at Chu^ion University, 
an organization called the 
Student Conservation 

Association (SCA) is asking for 
our help to save our earth. 

The SCA is the nation's oldest 



and largest provider of 
volunteers for full-time 
conservation work. It has been 
recruiting college students, 
adults, and high school students 
for public service projects since 
1957. 

Last year over 1000 college 
students and other adults 
participated in the Resource 
Assistant Program. This 
expen.se-paid intern.ship allows 
participants to live and work 
with professionals in the 
conservation field and enhances 
their future employment in the 
natural resource manasemenl 



UAB provides its own version of Vegas 



by Sherry Dickerson 
Features Writer 



Come one, come all! It's 
Monte Carlo Night at Clarion 
University. Come try your luck 
on Friday, September 17 at 7 
p.m. as UAB presents Monte 
Carlo Casino Night. The 
admission is free, so what's there 
to lose? 

The night includes gambling, 
prizes, and Kassandra-Magik of 
Tarot, in a Las Vegas-style 
setting. There will also be a 
spot-light cafe and union 
activities. 

Upon entering Monte Carlo 
Night, the student gamblers will 
he given "play money" to 
gamble with. Some may win, 
others may lose. So if you want 
to gamble and not lose "real" 



money, come to the Multi- 
purpose Room in the Gemmell 
Student Center. 

Even if you are not a gambler, 
come to Monte Carlo Night 
anyway. Your future is just 
waiting to be told -- either 



through the pabn of your hand or 
through the cards of the tarot. 

Come take a gamble at this 
year's Monte Carlo Night. It's 
like having Las Vegas just down 
the street. 



fields. 

Student Conservation 
Association volunteers travel to 
national parks, forests, wildlife 
refuges, and other sites 
throughout the country for a 
Resource Association program. 
This lasts twelve weeks and 
includes on-the-job training, 
housing, living, and travel 
expen.ses. Students also have tlie 
potential to receive academic 
credit. 

The SCA is currently accepting 
applications for positions offered 
in the winterAspring sea.son, but 
offers programs throughout the 
year. If the SCA receives an 
application by the following 
dates, it will increase tlie chance 
of acceptance for a position in 
tlieir program: 

Sept. 15-positions forNov/Dec 
1993; Nov. 15-positions for 



Jan/Feb 1994; and Jan. 15- 
positions for Mar/Apr 1994. 

If you miss these dates this 
year, applications will be 
available during the summer and 
fall of 1994. Con.servation is a 
year-round commitment, iuid the 
SCA proves this each year. 

If you are interested in 
conservation and have strong 
convictions about saving the 
earth and its creatures, take 
advantage of this wonderful 
opportunity. Conserving the 
earth is a challenging but 
rewarding job. 

To learn more about 
participating in Student 
Conservation Association 
programs, contact: SCA, P.O. 
Box 550, Charlestown. Nil 
03603. or call (603) 543-1700, or 
fax (603) 543-1828. 



Clarion Video Center 



604 Main St. 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Monday-Thuisday !()-8 Fiiday & Satuiday 10-9 

Sunday 12-5 
Free Membership! 

Any Movies from Old to New! 



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5x10' space - $31 .80 per month 

Deposit required - Lju^ger spaces available 

.Access 7 days a week 

NEWLY INSTALLED SECURITY GATE 

Phone (814) 226-9122 



Page 14 - The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 



Student Senator Profiles: JCWart and Donahue Strfve tO 

make a difference for Clarion University students 






by Amy Ckrkin 
Features Editor 



One ol Ihc inosf imporiani 
campus orgjuii/atioiis at Clarion 
University is the Stiulenl Senate, 
whieh is the representative 
legislative assembly ot the 
Clarion Students Association. 
Acting as the Boiird of Directors 
of the C.S.A., the Student Senate 
is vested with all powers of the 
(\S.A.. 

This certainly sounds 
important, and one of the 
senators with enough mnbition to 
tiike office is Michael Jewart. A 
senior history major, Jewart ran 
for Student Senate because "I 
felt I could iniikc a difference on 
liie Senate. 1 felt I could bring a 
variety of opinions from the 
student bcxly to the Senate, and 
then work to make Clarion a 
better place." 

Jewart works on the Social 
Equities and Student Centers 
committees. The Social Equity 



Committee works for campus 
cultural diversity, promotes 
multi-cultural activities, and 
considers issues and concerns 
relative to social equity. Jewart 
plans to work closely with 
Minority Affairs [uid complete a 
prog nun. 

The Student Centers 
(\>mmiitee represents the voice 
of the students when acting on 
issues dealing with Gemmell 
Student Center. Jewju^t plans to 
complete a Center survey, and 
hopes to have Clarion 
University's TV-5 tape a special 
on the Gemmell Center. 

Michael Jewart is also busy 
outside of the Student Senate 
office. He is a writer for the 
Clarion Call, the president of the 
History Honor Society, and a 
resident assistant in Ralston. 
Jewart is also part of the Student 
Senate Conduct Board. 

Jewart considers Clarion 
University's size to be the best 
asset of the campus. "Because 




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No coupons on Delivery! 
OPEN Sunday 10 am - 12 midnight 
Mon. - Wed. 10 am - 2 am 
Thurs. - Sat. 10 am -3 am 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
"To Be Your Voice, We Must Hear Your Voice," Is the motto of 
Student Senators Michael Jewart and Amy Donahue, each who 
are willing to represent the opinions of the Clarion student body. 

of Clarion's small size, it is quite Amy Donahue, Senator 



easy to develop personal 
relationships with students and 
faculty on campus," he 
comments. However, Jewart 
feels that "the lack of interest of 
some students" is the worst 
detriment of C.U.P. "Not only 
are they hurting their education, 
they are taking away from the 
learning experience of other 
students," says Jewart. 

What needs to be changed at 
C.U.P.? Communication is a 
major factor involved with some 
campus problems. "I think there 
has to be better communication 
between the students and the 
administration. There are just 
too many students who feel they 
do not have a voice in policy 
making on this Ciunpus," Jewiirt 
claims. 

Michael Jew<u"t just has one 
more thing to say to the entire 
student body of Clarion 
University, "Your four years at 
Clarion will go by very fast. 
Finjoy your lime spent in Clarion 
but also hit the bcwks, for that is 
what we are rciilly here for. One 
more thing, don't just sit around. 
If you are bored, that is your 
fault. Get involved and have 
fun!" 



"I simply wanted to make a 
difference at Clarion University," 
is the reason why Student 
Senator Amy Donahue ran for 
office. 

A sophomore communications 
major, Donahue is an important 
part of the Student Senate. She 
is on the Personnel committee, 
which deals with personnel 
matters including those 
described in the collective 
bargaining agreement, and 
developing and monitoring 
ethics guidelines for the Student 
Senate. 

Donahue is also a part of the 
Legislative Affairs committee, 
which keeps the student body 
aware of political situations on 
the local, state, and federal levels 
which will directly or indirectly 
affect the students of Clarion 
University. "Legislative Affairs 
worked on a lime capsule yet to 
be buried as well as organized 
letter writing campaigns and 
voter registration," said 
Donahue. 

Not only is Donahue a part of 
the previous committees, but she 
is also the chair of the Public 
Relations committee. This 
committee presents Student 



Pint Sigma Sigma Congrafulafes 
Our New Sisters: 

holly B risen 
Stephanie bevjire 
Kelly Dodsori 
Nicky Haberberger 
Jen Koren Kathy Tirnblln 

Jeanne McCaul 

We Love You! 



Marsha Mlfchel' 
Jen Simonsen 
/Andrea Straw 
lyiarla Jassone 




Senate <uid all of its committees 
to the generiU public through the 
use of various fonns of media. 
Donahue mentioned that (he PR 
committee is creating a yeiubcx)k 
for the 1993 Senate. They are 
also compiling a scrapbook to be 
placed in the Senate office. 

Donahue may seem to be 
extremely busy in the Student 
Senate office, but she also holds 
executive offices outside the 
Senate. She is Corresponding 
Secretary of Phi Sigma Sigma 
sorority, and is also the president 
of the University Activities 
Board. 

Amy Donahue considers the 
people of Chuion to be the best 
asset of C.U.P. "This is a 
community of not just faculty 
and students, but friends as 
well," she comments. 

However, Donahue feels, that 
communication is a setback of 
Clarion University, "Although 
this is a smaller community, I 
have found the lack of 
communication within the 
college community has been one 
wall that is difficult to break 
down." 

When asked what changes 
need to be instituted at Clarion, 
Donahue replies, "On a social 
level, I would love to see more 
students become involved in our 
recognized organizations or at 
least lake advantage of the 
programs tlie organizations have 
to offer. . .There are other 
concerns about administrations, 
educational programs and 
facilities that students need to 
address." 

As a message to the entire 
student body. Amy Donahue 
adds, "Please remember our 
(Student Senate) motto: 'To Be 
Your Voice, We Must Hear Your 
Voice.' Student Senate is to 
serve the students, and in order 
to represent the student body, we 
need to know (your) needs. We 
are the governing body of 
Clarion Student Association, and 
we want to make life belter for 
all students. Remember your 
Senators!" 

UAB presents 

Welcome Back Dance 

9 p.m. Saturday, 
Sept. 18 

Gemmell Multi- 
purpose Room 



8 







The Clarion Call - 9-16-93- Pace 15 



vk/ 



Would it be better if 

Clarion 's spring break was 

rescheduled to coincide with 

spring breaks at other 

universities? 

CALL-ON'YOU 
compiled by 
Scott Dillon 




Blair Hindman 

Senior, English 

"It's probably a good idea due to the fact that 

families could spend more time together." 






Susie Provenzano 

Senior, Marketing 

"Yes, because you could spend time with 

friends from other schools." 



Chrissy Bracken 

Junior, Psychology 

"Yes, because there could be more people 

from different schools on break." 



Cindy Strohm 

Freshman, Elementary/Special Ed. 

"I think so, because you could see your 

friends from your hometown." 




Scott Delval 

Sophomore, Secondary Ed./ History 

"Yes, so I can go home with all my 

friends." 




VVhendy Gahring 

Junior, Communication 

"Yes, it's a great idea. You might meet 

your dream man down there." 







^^^^^^j^ 






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Donna Patrick 

Sophomore, Communication 

"Yes, because there would be more people to 

party with." 



Page 16 - The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 



The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 - Page 17 



Entertainment 




For several hours, confusion reigned. 



"For crying out loud, I was hibernatingl 
Don't you guys ever take a pulse?" 



A tragedy occurs off the coast 
of a land called Honah-Lee. 



|l»l«» 



V 




Doonesbury 



BY GARRY TRUDEAU 



aA9S0F1997:MAy 
I OFFICIALP/ iOBLCOM5 
YOU 10 JHd FeUOUBHIP 
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"F^uoujeHiP'; OF cwRsa, 

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AN IPBAL THAT IN RBCBNT 
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ANCBANP J>>^^^mM^, 

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HbY.YO, ...R5C06NIZIN6, 

ISN'T THAT OFCOURSe, THAT 

■ ANIMPLICn- IMAYBa 
LYRAOST TOOLATd. 

STATm^m^ J 




Listen — I bought these here yesterday, and the 
dang things won't stop squeaking!" 





— Crossword Answers 








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THF POme ANP THF PINING 
ROOM TABiSe. ITMEMeOPm- 
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FRATBRNITie^, MAKJhJG THBIR 
CULTURAL mPSOaALOPPOR- 
TUNfTIE^ AVAILABLB TO ALL ! 




,7 MFANe LBTTIN6 1. OOOFLOUJ- 
t-R^ BLOOM, CeLSBRATINO OUR 

MULTI- CULTURAL DlVBFSny, IN- 

5T5AP OF LerriNe rrpRive us 

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rOPAY IN A diOIAJ AGAINST 
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VFR-yl TY ORPBREV THB PB - 
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PRBSIPBNT m&e Pe-5IRB 
TOB-NP "miNtC BNCUWBS" 
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Although history has long forgotten them, Lambini 

& Sons are generally credited with the Sistine 

Chapel floor. 



Calvin and Hobbes 



^^\L»»5CK \ ; 



by Bill Watterson 



TOD^V FOR SUOW frKD TtLL, 
I H^\iE ^N UTTERLM 

^w^zlNG'^^\sTLE.• ill 

DEMONSTRMt . 



TYlKET 



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THE Crossword 












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2 Tiller tarns 

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7 Hat 39 Rear exit 55 Ready lor 

8 Continent 40 Synthetic publication 

9 Tanned hides materials 56 Memory 

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Item 43 Transmitted 60 Knockout count 

1 1 Sea bird 45 School book 

12 Small pie 46 Publishes 

1 3 Nautical term 49 warning sound 
21 Chair 50 Passageway 
23 Employ 51 Great Lake 

25 Surpass 52 Frost 

27 Dish of greens 53 Rescue 

28 Martini garnish 

29 Unobstructed 





IN THE BLEACHERS 

by Steve Moore 



m^ 



C>1993 Tribune Media Sflfvices, Inc 
All Rights Reserved 



' T - v S -S 




<?-<; 



"Box him, you fool! He's drawing you into his kind of 

fight!!" 



Page 18 - The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 




The Psychology behind 

the Citibank Classic Visa card, and the 

emotional security of the Photocard. The citibank classic visa® instiiis in students 

feelings of safety, security, and general wellness not unlike those experienced in the womb. Therefore, it is the mother of 
all credit cards. 

Some experts attribute these feelings to the Citibank Photocard, the only credit card with your photo on it. A 
voice inside says, "This is me, really me." (As opposed to, "Who the heck is that?" - a common response to the photo on 

one's driver's license.) It's an immediate form of ID, a boost to your self-image. 

Of course if your card is ever lost or stolen and a stranger is prevented form 
using it, you'll feel exceptionally good (showing no signs of Credit Card Theft Nervosa). 

Other experts point to specific services, such as The Lost Wallet^"^ Service 
that can replace your card usually within 24 hours. Or the 24-Hour Customer Service 
line, your hotline, if you will, for any card-related anxiety whatsoever. 

Further analysis reveals three servicers that protect the purchases you make 

on the Citibank Classic Visa card, at no additional cost.. 1. Buyers Security^"^ can 
cover them against accidental damage, fire or theft, for 90 days from the date of 

purchase^ (preventing, of course. Insecurity). 2. Citibank Lifetime Warranty^"^ 
allows one to extend the warranty for the expected service life of eligible products up to 
1 2 years.^ 

3. And Citibank Price Protection assures you of the best price. You need only see the 
same item advertised in print for less, within 60 days, and Citibank will refund the 

difference up to $150^ (hence no Post Purchase Depression). 

Special student savings are particularly therapeutic. There's the free 
Citibank Calling Service^"^ from MCI to save up to 26% on long distance calls versus 
AT&T.-^ (You're encouraged to call Mom and Dad regularly preventing Parenta Non-Supportus.) And a $20 Airfare 

Discount^ on any domestic flight. (Case studies indicate that a Fear of Flying is overcome when Spring Break in sunny 
Florida is a possibility.) Not to mention the low variable interest rate of 

15.4%^ and no annual fee for college students. 

Suffice it to say, you'll have a credit card you can depend on while 
building a credit history. So call 1-800- CITIBANK, extension 19, to apply 
over the phone (student's don't need a job or a cosigner) or to have your photo 
added to your Citibank Classic Visa card. 

If we say that a sense of Identity is the first component of Citibank 
Classic Visa card, a sense of Security the second, and a sense of Autonomous 
Will from your newfound financial independence the third, don't be crazy. . . 
Call. 



Suhji'i t \nffi'rini> frinii 
Credit Can! Thcfl Nervosa. 




Subject after reielviny Citibank 
Classi( Visa Photocanl. 




CmBANCO 



^^4uUl^iiJbeA 



CLASSIC 



tl28 0012 3'*Sb 1810 



06/91 0J/3l/9i CV 
LINDA WAlKCft 



Not just Visa. Citibank Visa. 



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The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 - Page 19 




Eagles let one slip away, 19-17 



by Nathan Kahl 
Sportswriter 



After watching Dave 
MacDonald pass for 362 yards in 
West Chester's opening game, 
and knowing the expiosiveness 
of the Golden Eagle offense, one 
would have expected a high 
scoring affair last Saturday. 
Instead, the MVP's were Keith 
O'Connor and Bill Pryor? The 
respective punters for the Eagles 
and Rams combined for 20 punts 
for 710 yards as West Chester 
held off Clarion 19-17. 

"Family Day" at Memorial 
Stadium started off on a high 
note for Eagle fans. After 
stalling on their opening drive, 
Frank Andrews recovered an 
Scott Eberly fumble on the 28 
yard line. Not only did this give 
Clarion possession of the ball, 
but it also look the dangerous 
Pryor out of position to kick. 
After a short Art Gregory run 
and a pass to Jess Quinn, Chris 



vicious hit to Ben Lindsey a split 
second after Lindsey caught the 
ball. As quickly as Lindsey 
caught the ball, he was separated 
from it, and Shawn Kimple 
recovered at the West Chester 
28. Lindsey laid immobile on 
the field for several moments 
after the hit. The result was a 
27 yard field goal to extend 
Clarion's lead to 9-0. 

With about eight minutes left 
in the half, West Chester was 
finally able to get on the 
scoreboard. Starting with good 
field position at about the 50, 
MacDonald hit Jarmin Culbreth 
and Rich Neal to move the Rams 
down to the Clarion ten. After 
Scott Eberly was stuffed on a run 
up the middle, MacDonald hit 
Neal in the end zone. The exu-a 
point was blocked by Eric 
Acord. 

Near the end of the first half 
Clarion worked its way down 
into scoring position with Zak 
hitting Tim Brown with a couple 




Pat McDevitt/ Clarion Call 
Searching for a hole: Clarion tailback Damien Henry (1) found 
enough running room to gain 109 yards on the day. 



Zak hit prc-season All- American 
Marlon Worthy on a 16 yard out 
pattern to take an early 6 point 
lead. Paul Cramer, diagnosed 
with Scott Norwood disease, 
missed the extra point wide 

right. 

Midway through the first 
quarter, El Ponder, who had a 
fantastic day in Clarion's 
secondary and on special teams, 
stormed downfield on an 
O'Connor punt and delivered a 



of passes. Brown avenged an 
earlier dropped pass by getting 
open over the middle for a 16 
yard first down placing Clarion 
in West Chester territory. The 
Eagles got close enough for 
Cramer to try a 46 yard field 
goal. Now, this is the type of 
moment that we so often run 
across in sports where on a given 
day next month, next week, or 
Q^'pvi tomorrow this kick would 




Pat McDevitt/Clarion Call 
Omnipresent: Clarion cornerback Eldridge Ponder (2) made 
seven takles, broke up five passes and forced a fumble Saturday. 

Saturday, September 1 1 th, and were creeping into field goal 



have 



'•■ough. But on 



Cramer's kick hit the crossbar 
and bounced ever so agonizingly 
back into tlie field of play. The 
score remained 9-6. 

The disappointment didn't last 
long, however. MacDonald 
tried to engineer his team for a 
score before the half and was 
picked off by Frank Andrews, 
who returned the ball to the 39 
yard line. Alter a penally moved 
Clarion back to the 50, passes to 
Brown and Quinn placed the ball 
on the 18. With jusl six seconds 
remaining in the half, Zak found 
Kevin Harper in the left corner 
of the end zone. Zak hit Quinn 
for the two point conversion, and 
Clarion went into halflime with a 
comfortable 17-6 lead. 

To begin the second half. 
Clarion came out running rather 
unsuccessfully. This gave West 
Chester good field position, and 
on two consecutive possessions, 
the Rams drove into field goal 
range and closed the score to 17- 
12. 

Widi ten minutes to go. West 
Chester once again started at 
midfield. On the second play 
from scrimmage Shawn Little 
ran 43 yards on a draw play for a 
touchdown. All of a sudden 
Clarion was down 19-17. 

The Eagles sustained a solid 
drive on their next possession 



range at the West Chester 28. 
But, Zak was sacked for a loss of 
five yards, and on fourth down, 
was sacked for a loss of nine. 

The defense stuffed West 
Chester and forced them to punt. 
The Golden Eagles were resting 
on their own 15 yard line with 
about six minutes to play. 
Anyone who has ever .seen John 
Filway orchesiiate a drive at the 
end of a game can tell you that 
this can be done. The Eagles 
made it to the Cheskcr 39, but 
again faced a fourth down, this 
one a fourth-and-five situation 
with 3:50 remaining. In an 
attempt to pin the Rams deep in 
their own territory, the E!agle 
braintrust opted to punt and 
hoped that the offense would 
have just one last shot. The 
strategy backfired. 

West Chester gave the ball to 
Little eight consecutive times for 
a total of 55 yards. By the time 
the Rams had punted, Clarion 
was stuck on their own 10 with 
20 seconds left. Anyone who 
has ever seen.... no, John Elway 
couldn't even do this. 

The Eagles travel to New 
Haven, Connecticut to batUe the 
number two Division II team in 
the country on Saturday. The 
Eagles lost a 48-47 heartbreaker 
to the Chargers last season. 





1 


2 


3 


4 


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W. Chester 
Clarion 



9 


6 
8 


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•19 
■17 


FIRST QUARTER 



Clarion: Worthy 1 6 pass 
from Zak (kick failed). 12:09. 
Drive: 3 plays, 28 yards. Key 
play: Andrews recovers 
Eberly fumble at WC 28. 
Clarion 6. West Chester O. 

Clarion: Cramer 27 FG, 
10:24. Drive: 6 plays, 28 
yards. Key play: Kimple 
recovers Lindsey fumbled 
punt at WC 28. Clarion 9. 
West Chester 0. 

SECOND QUARTER 

Westchester: Neal 10 pass 
from MacDonald (kick 
blocked). 7:06. Drive: ^ 
plays, 53 yards. Key play: 
Neal 34 pass from MacDonald 
on 2nd and 1 from Clarion 
44. Clarion 9. West 
Chester 6. 

Clarion: Harper 18 pass 
from Zak (Quinn pass from 
Zak). 0:06. Drive: 6 plays, 39 
yards. Key play: Defensive 
holding on WC negates 
Interception. Clarion 17, 
West Chester 6. 

THIRD QUARTER 

West Chester: Brandes 40 
FG, 6:36. Drive 7 plays, 52 
yards. Key play: Neal 1 4 
pass from Levin moving ball 
from WC 48 to CUP 38. . 
Clarion 17, West Chester 9. 

West Chester: Brandes 27 
FG.3:18. Drive: 6 plays, 41 
yards. Key play: Clarion 
defense holds 1 st and goal 
from 5. Clarion 17, West 
Chester 12. 

FOURTH QUARTER 

West Chester: Little 43 run 
(Brandes kick), 10:48. Drive: 
2 plays. 48 yards. Key play: 
Little run on 2nd and 5. West 
Chester 19, Clarion 17. 

PLAYER STATISTICS 

Passing- Zak 16 of 39 for 220 
yards. 2 TDs and 1 INT. 
Rushing- CUP:Henry 26-109 
WC: Little 21-154 
Receiving- Quinn 6 for 80 
Brown 6 for 68. 



Pace 20 . The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 

Eagles drop Gannon 6-3 



Tennis team sets sights on PSAC 



by Tundelaya Carey 
Sportswriter 



The Chirion women's tennis 
learn compiled a 1-2 record over 
the past week and took a well 
deserved five-day break in 
preparation for the start of the 
PSAC schedule. 

The Lady Fiagles, led by 
coach Terry Acker, began their 
1993 campaign on the road at 
Westminster in which they lost a 
tough match 5-4. Shara 
Wolkimir led the way by 
defeating Jen Riznick in straight 
sets 6-1, 6-4. Sarah Unkefer 
powered her way to victory in a 
tough tliree set match 2-6, 7-5, 6- 
2 and freshman Kristen 
McKinley, in her career debut, 
won in straight sets 6-2, 7-5. 

The Lady Eagles then 
travelled to face a very powerful 
and experienced Geneva team. 
ITie match was lied 3-3 alter the 
singles were completed, but 
Geneva swept the double 



matches guiding them to a 6-3 
win. Wolkimir once again led the 
way with a straight set victory 
7-6, 6-4. Melodi Dess and 
McKinley were also victorious. 
Dess won 7-6(8-6), 6-4, and 
McKinley came away with a 
straight set 6-1, 6-3 victory. 

Coming off of two 
tough losses on the road, and 
playing their third match in four 
days, the Lady L^agles returned 
home and destroyed Gannon 6- 
3. Wolkimir opened the match 
with a tough three set loss, but 
her teammates came to her aid 
taking the next four matches. 
Freshman sensation Kristin 
McKinley extended her record to 
3-0 with a 6-2, 6-4 straight set 
victory. The dynamic duo of 
Wolkimir and Dess extended 
their doubles mark to 2-1, 
winning by default. 

The Lady Eagles travel 
to California on Friday to face 
the Lady Vulcans, then travel to 
Mercyhurst on Saturday, before 



Croiss Country 

Results from the 22nd Annual 
California University of Pennsylvania 

Invitational 

Women 5.000 meters 

Time Place 

LisaGriffo 21:43:8 10 

LisaBenlock 22:02.7 12 

Megan Stecklair 22:04.4 13 

Men 5.1 miles 

Time Place 

RussBreindel 30:18.3 21 

Scott Reffner 31:29.5 27 




Chrlstin Mihan/Clarion Call 
Serving it up: Clarion's Shara Wolkimir captured straight set 
victories in tier first two matclfes, but was humbled Sunday by 
Gannon's Talley Sjoberg. 



returning home for matches 
against Pitt on Monday and 
wSlippery Rock on Wednesday. 
Both home matches are 
scheduled for 3:30 starts. 

Clarion has finished first in the 
PSAC five of the last seven 
yeais, compiling an 85-6 record 
over that stretch. "This is a very 
aggressive and spirited team," 
Acker staled, "We believe we'll 
be competitive in the PSAC, but 
the rest we'll just have to wait 
and see." 

Clarion vs. Gannon 

#1. Sjoberg(G) over 

Wolkimir(C) 7-5. 2-6. 6-3. 

#2 Milton(C) over 

TrapoId(G) 6-0. 6-1. 

#3 Dess(C) over Andre{G) 

6-2. 6-0. 

#4 Unkefer(C) over 

McCauley(G) 5-7. 6-3. 6-3. 

#5 McKinlcy(C) over 

Delaney(G) 6-2, 6-4. 

#6 Mikhina(G) over 

Turowski(C) 6-3.6-1. 



PSAC schedule begins 

Eagles fall to Scots, drop to 2-8 



by Debbie Adams 
Sportswriter 



The Clarion volleyball team 
is ten games into the 1993 
season and has yet to play in the 
friendly confines of Tippin 
Gymnasium. The Golden Eagles 
lost for the eighth time in its last 
ten games Tuesday night as the 
Edinboro Fighting Scots 
defeated the Eagles, three games 
to one. 

Clarion dropped the first two 
sets 12-15 and 5-15 before 
rebounding for a 16-14 victory in 
game three. The Scots put the 
Eagles away in game four by 
outscoring them 15-8. 

Bobbie Simpson led Clarion 
with 12 kills, and Lisa Flynn 
added seven. Co-captain 
Meghan Kelly furnished 13 
assists and 1 1 digs in the losing 



cause. 

A four set loss at Slippery 
Rock preceded an 0-3 
performance at the Wayne State 
Tournament by the Eagles. 

Clarion drew the hosts in the 
first round and were beaten 15- 
13, 12-15, 14-16, 9-15. The 
Eagles could fare no better 
against Cal (10-15, 4-15, 0-15) 
or against Ashland (10-15, 10- 
15,6-15). 

The Eagles will finally play 
their first home match tonight 
(Thursday) against Robert 
Morris, and then complete their 
elongated two game homestand 
with a match against Lock 
Haven. 

The Golden Eagles will then 
embark on a four stop road u-ip 
which will eventually land them 
in Colorado, September 30 
through October 2. 



Team Leaders 



Set Assists 




Katie Rhodes 


174 


Meghan Kelly 


42 


Set % ( a t least 


10 att) 


Katie Rhodes 


.350 


Beth Tress 


.333 


Kills 




Bobbie Simpson 


101 


Lisa Flynn 


89 


Kill %(min. 10 


att) 


Melissa Brooks 


.417 


Bobbi Simpson 


.278 


Service Aces 




Lisa Flynn 


21 


Bobbie Simpson 


8 


Solo Blocks 




Bobbie Simpson 


18 



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Tuesday 

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Nacho's with cheese for $3.00 
& Draft Specials 



Catch the Eagles in action ! 



Football: at New Haven 

Volleyball: ROBERT MORRIS 
LOCK HAVEN 

Tennis: at California 
at Mercyhurst 
PITTSBURGH 
SLIPPERY ROCK 



1:30 Sat. 
7:30 Thu. 
7:00 Tue. 
3:30 Fri. 
12:00 Sat. 
3:30 Mon. 
3:30 Wed 



The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 - Page 21 



Sports Commentan: 

Like him or not, Jimmy Mac just keeps winning 



by Jody Males 
Sportswriter 



If you're as big a fan of the 
NFL as I am, then you shouldn't 
have any fingernails left! There 
were definitely some nailbiiers 
in week two of the NFI.. Five, 
count'em, five games were 
decided by a field goal; four in 
the closing seconds. So, if 
you're guilty of turning the 
television dial early, you missed 
some exciting moments this past 
Sunday. 

The most exciting ending 
came when 1 2 year NFL veteran 
Morten Anderson kicked a 44 
yard field goal as time expired to 
beat the Falcons in a wild 34-3 1 
decision. What makes this a 
little sweeter for Anderson is the 
fact that earlier in the game he 
nailed a 27 yarder to set an NFL 
record of 25 consecutive field 
goals. Next stop for Anderson: 
Canton, OH. 

In Green Bay, a struggling 
Roger Ruzek mustered enough 
boot to kick a 30 yarder with 
only seconds 'eft, and 
Philadelphia knocked off the 
hometown Packers 20-17. Want 
more? Dean Biasucci was the 
hero for Indianapolis as he 
pegged a 42 yarder with three 
seconds left to lift his Colts to a 
"wild" 9-6 victory over the 
Bengals. And, don't forget 
Jason Han.sen, whose fourth field 
goal of the day gave his Lions a 
19-16 overtime win against the 
Patriots. 

Also, in Minnesota, the Vikes 
' slipped by the Bears 10-7, thanks 
to a late TD pass from 
McMahon. No field goal at the 
gun, but still a three point 
decision. Regardless, if you're a 



lover of close ones, this past 
week was your blue heaven! 

Besides some exciting 
conclusions, this past week's 
games were a showcase for 
many homecomings. Numerous 
players either came home to play 
on their former playground or 
went head-to-head with their 



member of the Redskins' 
"Posse" returned to the teepee, 
only this time as a Phoenix 
Cardinal. Clark racked up 93 
yards through the air to upset die 
mighty 'Skins 17-10. 

Former Chicago Bear and 
Super Bowl XX QB, Jim 
McMahon, got his first start 




points down to a 31-31 deadkKk 
with the Saints. New Orleans 
was eventually able to pull off 
the victory, but what a show by 
Ilebert! Maybe the Saints 
should second-guess that move. 

In Denver, one-time Charger 
Rod Bemstine took the flash out 
of the ChcVgers bolt by scoring a 
touchdown in the Broncos 34-17 
drubbing of San Diego. 
Bernstine, a power back, has 
given the Orange Crush some 
punch out of the backfield, and 
has a nose for the goal line. 

The least successful 
homecoming this week was 
former Ram Kevin Greene who 

Chargers #2 ranked 



returned to the city of angels, 
only this time as a Steeler. The 
sack-happy Greene had the 
unenviable task of going up 
against ProBowl Tackle Jackie 
Slater who resembles a housing 
project more than a lineman. 
Greene's results? Forget it! A 
brick wall couldn't have done 
better than Slater! 

Well folks, week three is 
creeping ever clo.ser, as the NM. 
homecoming is now history. 
The excitement never ends, but 
there is one echoing question: 
Where's C_wher P_wer? Still 
searching for that "mythical" O! 



Clarion vs. New Haven on Sat. 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 



Screaming Viking: Minnesota's 
outrageous, but he could just be 

former team. 

Packer Reggie White was 
impressive in his reunion with 
the Eagles, collecting four 
tackles and two sacks, but the 
minister of defense ended up 
losing a heartbreaker, 20-17. 
Tim Harris, another defensive 
standout, traveled with the 
Failles to his old home, 
Titletown. USA. Wide receiver 
standout Gary Clark, a former 



AP Photo 
Jim McMahon may be 
the man to vault the Vikes. 

against his old team, as the 
Vikings squaked by 10-7. 
McMahon won the game in the 
4ih quarter on a 16 yard TD pass 
to Cris Carter, a bitter sweet 
victory for old headband 
McMcihon. 

And how about former New 
Orleans Saint QB Bobby 
Ilebert? The now- Atlanta QB 
threw three 4ih quarter TD 
passes to rally his team from 21 



It doesn't get any easier for the 
Clarion Golden Eagles. After 
bowing to defending PSAC-East 
champion West Chester 19-17 
last week, Uie Eagles will travel 
to New Haven, Connecticut to 
face the second highest ranked 
team in Division II, the New 
Haven Chargers. 

The Chargers are akeady 2-0, 
having posted a 45-33 win over 
West Chester and a 38-6 victory 
over Buffalo last week. They 
were ranked number one in the 
east last season, won the East 
Region Title, and advanced to 
the NCAA Division II semifinals 
before losing to eventual 
champion Jacksonville State. 

New Haven, who had the 
number one offense in the land 
last year averaging 38.8 points 
per game, are at a 41.5 cHp this 



year, averaging 224 yards on the 
ground and 231 Uirough the air. 

Quarterback James Weir 
directs the offense, and has 
completed 26 of 53 for 323 yards 
and three scores this year. 

Tony Willis leads an excellent 
corps of Charger receivers. 
Willis has already hauled in 13 
passes and has scored three times 
in 1993. 

Roger Graham, who rushed for 
1,717 yards and 22 touchdowns 
last year, akeady has gained 317 
yards on just 35 carries dirough 
the first two weeks. A.J. 
Livingston .scored 17 times last 
yejir and picked up 898 yiyds on 
the ground. 

The defense is susceptable to 
the pass, where it has given up 
an average of 293 aerial yards 
per contest. 

Clarion is averaging 347 yards 
of total otfense, and is allowing 
3 1 3 yards on defense. 



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Page 22 - The Clarion Call - 9-16-93 

Sports Commentary: 



As hoops and hockey near, baseball has center stage 



hy lien Vessa 
Sports Editor 



It used U) be so simple. A eap 
was somelhing to buy your kid a( 
Ihe ballpark, nol a lid lor 
player's sal;u"ies. A race was a 
baltle to the wire between two 
elubs, not a eriteria lor hiring or 



batting praetice balls into the 
outlield seats. 

The Philadelphia Phillies, who 
|{K)k more like a Thursdjiy night 
bowling league than a group ol 
professional athletes, hustled 



When asked about the 
onslaughts, manager Sparky 
Anderson simply put it, "We kill 
medi(KTe pitehing." 

Pitching could not have gotten 
any more mediocre than Jose 



lirin''. It used to be a 



game 



of 



inches, not grinches. But, just 
when it appeared that baseball 
was sealing its own doom, the 
summer of 1993 comes along to 
prove its invincibility. 

It stiuled in ilie summer when 
the San Francisco Giants, 
wallowing in poverty and on the 
brink of relocating to St. 
Petersburg, Florida, magically 
pulled $44 million from their 
grungy cardboard box lo 
purcha.se Barry Bonds. 

The season was less than 30 
games old when Tony Perez was 
fired from his managerial job in 
Cincinnati. Later it was realized 
that Perez was not the man the 
Reds wanted in the first place, 
that man was Davey Johnson. 
Perez was hired lo silence critics 
who believed the Reds' front 
office showed prejudices toward 
minorities. Then, in a display of 
loyalty not often witnessed in 
baseball, hitting coach Ron 
Oester resigned his position after 
hearing of Perez's release. 

In Colorado, fans came out in 
the billions to witness 
professional baseball. Montreal 
was the first team to visit Mile 
High and soon realized that this 
was no ordinary park. The 
Expos had to conclude batting 
practice 35 minutes early 
because they blasted all of their 




AP Photo 
Silent but deadly: Toronto's John Olerud suffered an aneurism as 
a kid, causing him to wear a helmet even when playing the Field. 
His gentle demeanor, and quiet "just doing my joh" attitude still 
has people wondering who he is. 



into the east lead, while the 
Giants coasted in the west. 

llie American League look it 
upon themselves lo make 1993 a 
year lo cherish. First, it was the 
Detroit Tigers, who made 20 
runs a game look effortless. 



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WHV am I PRL5SED LllCE HHS? Wlb 
ARE ALimStft-OB-E? WHAT AM 
I DoiMG ON A HoR5t^ WHERE AM I '? 



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Seconds before the start of tlie mco. Filipe suffers a 

mental lapse commonly known among jockeys as 

"rider's block " 



Canseco's debut in Fenway. 
After giving up three runs and 
throwing behind several batters, 
Canseco was diagnosed with a 
career-threatening injury in his 
throwing arm. 

While the Tigers were scoring 
and Canseco was injuring, John 
Olerud just kept on hilling. 
Olerud hovered around the .400 
mark until early September, and, 
it weren't for the fact ihai Frank 
Thomas is actually bigger than a 
u^ain, he would be a lock for the 
American League MVP. 

Thomas hoisted the White Sox 
on his broad shoulders and 
carried them into first place in 
the west. While Olerud is the 
mosl outstanding player in 93, 
Thomas is certainly the most 
valuable. 

An off-season trade of Craig 
Lefferts from the Padres lo the 
Rangers went fairly unnoticed, 
but soon players like Fernandez, 
Sheffield and McGriff would 
follow. San Diego had realized 
that the Giants and Braves were 
better teams, so instead of 



attempting to compete, ihey were 
financially insuring their 
existence. 

In Colorado, a guy named 
Galarraga was putting on an 
Olerud display. In New York, the 
Mcls players were pulling on a 
fireworks display, and in 
Chicago, the Pirates and Cubs 
were putting on a boxing display. 

A boxing display is ihe furthest 
from what Robin Ventura 
performed in Texas in late July. 
After Nolan Ryan planted a 93 
mph fastball in his back, Ventura 
ch.'irged the mound and received 
a barrage of nuggies that would 
have knocked Evander Holyfield 
down... well... maybe Gerry 
Ctx)ney. 

Even though Jim Leyland is as 
old and as physically fit as Gerry 
Cooney, it didn't stop the Bucco 
skipper from going after Dodger 



Kevin Gross last month. 
Leyland's antics marked the 
apex of a long hot summer of 
hostility, where hitters charged 
after pitchers, hiliers charged 
after managers, and Mo Vaughn 
was charged with involuntary 
man.slaughter. 

Despite all these shenanigans, 
despite all of the free agent 
contracts, despite all the fire 
.sales and fu-e-filled press boxes, 
baseball still reigns supreme. 
Three out of four pennant races 
are within three games with the 
American East having five 
applicants, and the best is yet lo 
come. 

So, as we move into football, 
and as we await hoops and 
hockey, we always must realize 
that baseball is the most 
indestructible game of all... and 
the best. 




Intramurals 



Due Dates for rosters 

Flag Football 

Tuesday, Sept. 21 3:00 

Men's, Women's, Co-ed Volleyball 

Friday, Sept. 24 3:00 

Co-ed Soccer 

Friday, Sept. 24 3:00 

Any questions call Ext. 2349 



I 



Help Wanted 



1 loineworkers Needed! 
But don't get caught in the 
homework fraud trap! Many 
legitimate firms will employ you 
now! Special Report- Send a 
long SASE and $1.00 to: 
Ilomeworking Opportunities 
InC/OT.M.F. 

P.O. Box 49 
Brookville, PA 15825 

Needed, occasional evening 

babysitters. 

Hours may range from 7 p.m. lo 

2 a.m. Must be able to provide 
references!! Anyone interested 
call Cathleen at 226-6232. 
(Transportation a plus, but nol 
necessary). 



Sales & Services 



GR£EKS & CLUBS 

RAISE UP TO $1,000 IN JUST 
ONE WEEK! For your 
fraternity, sorority & club. Plus 
$1,000 for yourself! And a 
FREE T-SHIRT just for calling. 
1-800-932-0528, ext. 75. 

2 Great floor seats for the Luther 
Vandross and En Vogue concert 
Sept. 20. Low $$ Call 226-9073. 

For Sale: 

'79 Dodge Aspen; Good 

Condition. Best Offer; Call 226- 

5522. 

ft 

Spring Break '94. Sell trips, earn 
cash and go free. Student Travel 
Services is now hiring campus 
reps. Call 1-800-6484849. 

Lock your keys in your car? Car 
break down and need towed? 
Call Hawk's Tiltbed Towing. 
Affordable. Accept 

Visa/Mastercard. 226-6008. 

CUP STUDENTS - HAVING 
PROBLEMS FINDING THE 
CORRECT SUPPLIES FOR 
YOUR TYPEWRITER - CALL 
CLARION OFFICE EQUIP. 
RT 66 South, 226-8740. 



nUTS SORORITIES! 
STUDENT GROUPS! 

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$100. ..$600... $1500! 

Market Applications for the hottest 

credit card ever - NEW CM 

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for FREE T-SHIRT & '94 CMC JIMMY. 

Call 1-600-950-1 039, exL 75. 



Rooms and Rent 



Roommate needed tor olf 
campu.s apt. $225 mo. include.s 
utilities. Pets okay. 226-5656. 

Sleeping room only, after 
September 12. Very near college. 
For info. 764-3419 (9:00 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m.) 



Personals 



COME RUSH WITH US!!! 
Alphi Phi Omega -- National 
Coed Service Fraternity invites 
you lo come join us for 
Leadership, Friendship and 
Service Tuesday 9/21 al the 
NairAVilkinson volleyball courts 
ai 7:00 p.m. and Wednesday 9/22 
al the Campbell Hall main lobby 
ai 8:00 p.m. for TWISTER! 
All are Welcome! Bring a friend! 

The sisiers of Zela Tau Alpha 
would like lo welcome everyone 
back and wish everyone a happy 
and successful semesier. 

Congratulations Tammie Snyder 
on your engagement- We're so 
proud of you! Love, your Zela 
sisters. 



Congratulations 



Jodi 



and 

(finally) Analisa on your 
lavaliers. Your Zela sisters are 
happy for you! 

Happy belated birthday Maria. 
Love, your Zela sisters. 



Reggae away with ZTA! All 
CUP women are welcome lo our 
rush parties. Mon. Sept 20, 
casual party 8-9; Tues. Sept 21 
Theme party 8-9:30; Wed. Sept. 
22 Preference Parly, 8-9 at the 
Zeta house -- 9 Wilson Ave. 



RUSH ALPHA SIGMA TAU! 
RRST RUSH PARTY ON 9-20, 
6-7 pm AT AST HOUSEl 
MEET AT CARLSON IF YOU 
NEED A RIDE! 



The Clarion Call - 9-16-93- Page 23 

LASSIFIEDS 



The sisters of I'heta Phi Alpha 
wish everyone a fun and 
successful rush! 

Congratulations to Leslie 
Cathcart for being National Phi 
Sigma Sigma undergraduate of 
the year. We love you ! 
Phi Sigma sigma. 



Theta Xi- We had a blast 
hanging out in the sand and 
dancing by the pool. Thanks for 
a great time. Love, Phi Sigma 
Sigma. 

Congratulations lo Jennifer 
Horner for receiving the 
Individual Scholarship Award. 
We love you! Phi Sigma Sigma. 

Sigma Chi"Thanks for the great 
Twister mixer. Let's do it again 
soon. Love, the sisers of Delta 
Zeta. 

Join the Delta Zeta fiesta! Rush 
is right around the corner in 
Delta Zetaville. First party: 
Monday, Sept. 20 8-9 p.m. at the 
Delta Zela house. See you there! 

To Phi Sigma Kappa: 

Thank you for the homecoming 

nomination. I'm looking forward 

lo Float '93! I love you guys! 

Whendy 

The sisters of Thela Phi Alpha 
invite you to spend some time at 
the "Theta Phi house" on 32 
Shady Avenue for our casual 
party on Monday Sept. 20 from 
7-8 p.m. Then come "Cruise the 
Jungle" with us on Tuesday at 9 
p.m. al the Theta Phi house. 
Don't forget lo bring your 
appetite! 

Hey Canoe #4! Did you guys dry 
off yet? Before you learn to bail, 
you need to learn to swim- it's 
fun! 

Clarion Call Classifieds really 
work- and they're economical. 



Fox's Pizza 

FREE 2 liter of pop 

Buy one large one topping pizza 

and get your choice of; 

7up, Coke or Rootbeer . 

Expires- September 19, 1993 



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Sports Commentary: 

If Abbott and Costello had to do their act today 



hy Rodney Sherman 
Disgruntled Baseball Fan 

"I ley Ahbott, since you're the 
manager of this baseball team, 
how about introducing me to 
some of the players?" 

"Cerliiinly I'll inu-oduce you to 
ilie bt>ys, Let's see, on the bases 
we have Jones on first-" 

"You mean Who, what's a 



matter, can't you remember the 
routine?" 

"Well the le.uii changed over 
the off-season, Who got lied up 
in a palimony suit in wSiui Diego. 
They figure the trijU will last all 
summer. We called up Jones 
from U"iple Av" 

"Ahhh, 1 see, well just pick it 
up at second base " 

"Second base? That would be 



Smith." 

"Smith? What happen to 
What, you remember, I'd say 
Who's on second and you'd say 
'No, What's on second.'" 

"What's gone. He hit .324 
with 26 homers and 10.3 RBI's 
last year. Became a free agent 
and signed with a west coast 
team for million.s, we couldn't 
cilford to keep him." 




FOUR 



••** 



226-8881 



Sun-Wed 11AM-Midnight 
Thurs 11AM-1AM 
Fri-Sat11AM-2AM 



327 W. MAIN ST. CLARION, PA 



September 
Special 

Two 12" Cheese 
Pizza 



•••• 



Only $7.99 p,uo,a. 

$1.80/topping covers both pizzas 



We have 2 sizes of pizza 
to choose from: 
12" 8 slices 
16" 12 slices 

or 

6 different kinds of Subs 

Ham&Cheese Meatball Sub 
Steak & Cheese Pizza Sub 
Italian Sub Veggie Sub 



r* "■"■"■■ 


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FOUR 


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1 PIZZA 


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1 Includes BIG 12" SUB plus | 


Includes 16" one-item pizza 


1 plus 2 cups of Pepsi i 




2 cups of Pepsi 1 


1 plus 4 cups of Pepsi 


1 (mrted detiveiy 


area only E xpnes a/30/93 i 


lifTwIed det*very area only E xpif es 9<30/93 


dmited dekvery aiea only Expnes 9/30/93 


1 


1 




J 


1 



"How 'bout third, is I Don't 
Know still on third?' 

"I Don't Know, didn't you 
hear? He was at home 
somewhere in Latin America and 
the government there was 
overthrown. He's the dictator 
there now. We picked up old 
man Walker off wiiivcrs to cover 
third until I Don't know gets 
overthrown." 

"You have to have those 
outfielders. Why and Because." 

"Why is serving time for his 
fourth DUI conviction, then it's 
off to the Betty Ford clinic for 
his other problems." 

"Because?" 
"Expansion draft." 

"The pitcher, Tomorrow, is he 
here?" 

"On the di.sabled list, shut his 



throwing hand in the door of a 
taxi cab. At least that's what 
we're telling the press." 

"The catcher. Today, he was 
always a solid player, what's the 
deiil with him?" 

"Holding out for a new 
contract, won't play unless we 
up the money." 

" Why and Becau.se gone, Who 
in court, What in California, 
Today pouting about money, I 
Don't Know lost in central 
America, this team is a bunch of 
strangers, and you know what, I 
DON'T GIVE A DARN!" 

"What was that?" 

"I said I don't give a dam." 
"Oh yeah, our former 
shortstop. He's in charge of fan 
relations now." 




Sports Information photo 
Clarion University's 1993 Integra, Pepsi, Wilson Golf 
Classic winners (from L-R): Denny Painter, Ed Grejda, Greg 
Wolf and Vince Grejda. The tournament whicli benefits 
Clarion's Waldo S. Tippin Athletic Scholarship Fund, raised 
a record total of $29,000. 



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$7 00 Deluxe Wash $6.00 

One Discount Coupon Per Wash 
oner Expires May 31. 1994 



CAR 



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i 




Volume 74, Issue 3 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 23, 1993 



Issue 



News 



Parking w<>fs 
Cars, Citfs everywhere imi m 
a place to park pg. 5j 



Lifestyles 

Semester ahritad 

Explore a .sunny island, ani^ 
get credits tor it pg. H 



Sports 



Kitgles 0-2 
Slow Start sends (ioldei 
Eagles h<ane winlc.vs. , ,pg. 191 



Clarion *s 

pother Outlook I 

|- 

^rklaj?: P^lysaaay, 

Satercby: Momy sassy, 

S«ftd&y: Mostly 

cl<:)udy,Jbi^Ji 15 
al^itday: Btieezy, mM 

high 74 
15B«sday: Cknidy, rain, 

high 70 
Wtdnesday: Sunny, wanner 

high 75 



Index 



Cojtnmenidr) 
News. 
TV Guid. 
Ulcstyles . . . 
Firtertainment 

Spcffts 

ChissJikds 



Pg-2 

pg. 5 

fi 101 

Pg.ll! 

pg- m 

P2 2:^1 



Recent incidents do not show an 
upward trend in crime, some say 



by Sarah Cunningham 
Contributing Writer 

An incident at Campbell Hall 
last Wednesday, Sept. 15, led to 
the arrest of Robert Eric 
Kearney, of Altoona, on charges 
of resisting arrest, a second- 
degree misdemeanor; disorderly 
conduct, a third degree 
misdemeanor; criminal mischief, 
a summary offense; and 
underage consumption, also a 
summary offense. 

According to Ben Vessa, a 
resident assistant in Campbell, a 
report was received at the front 
desk of the residence hall that an 
argument was in progress 
between a female and a male on 
the seventh floor of the building. 

A resident on the floor said she 
observed Kearney, a non-student, 
displaying drunken and 
boisterous behavior, yelling 
obscenities and arguing with a 
female friend. 

It took several residents and 
approximately half an hour to 
coax the victim outside the 
dorm. 

According to Vessa, Kearney 
continued badgering the 
residents and threw one girl to 
the pavement. Public Safety was 
inmiediately called. 

When the officer arrived at the 
scene, said Vessa, Kearney and 
the girl were sitting in a car in 
the parking lot. The officer asked 
the girl to step out of the car and 
questioned her 

As the officer was questioning 
her, Kearney also got out of the 
car. The officer asked him to get 
back in, but Kearney refused and 
began to walk away. The officer 
attempted to grab the suspect's 
arm but the suspect began 
flailing his arms and screaming 
vulgarities at the officer, said 
Vessa. 

At one point, Kearney hit 
officer Keith A. Kaschalk in the 
eye. The officer placed him 
under arrest, but had difficulty 
resu^aining him. 

By this time, another officer 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Cam 
Despite recent incidents, both on and near campus, local officials say it is too early to 
determine if this is a trend. This police car responded to a call on Wilson Ave. 



had arrived on the scene, and 
together they managed to 
handcuff him and put the suspect 
in the Public Safety car. Kearney 
then began kicking at the rear 
passenger window of the car, 
said Vessa. 

Kearney also called officers 
racists and referred to a female 
Public Safety officer in vulgar 
terms, Vessa said. Kearney later 
told police he had drank 10 shots 
of tequila and three beers before 
the incident. 

Kearney was held overnight in 
Clarion county jail and released 
on his own recognizance. He 
failed to show up for a 
preliminary hearing and a 
warrant has been issued for his 
arrest. 

Despite many recent incidents, 
including this one, crime hasn't 
really increased on campus. 



according to students and 
officials. 

"Crime always increases when 
school starts because the 
population doubles, but I don't 
see any significant uend starting 
Uiis year," Chief R. Eric Shaeffer 
of the Clarion Borough Police 
said. According to criminal 
statistics, the particular age 
bracket from 17-24 has the 
highest number of victims and 
criminals, said Shaeffer. 

The director of University 
Relations, Ron Wilshire, said 
that "although there may be a 
slight increase in the number of 
incidents over last year, it is still 
early to determine if this is a 
trend. As witnessed by recent 
national news reports, we are 
living in an increasingly violent 
society." 

Wilshire urges everyone to, 



"take common sense 
precautionary measures when 
they walk at night, including 
walking in pairs, uaveling with 
friends and staying in well- 
lighted areas." 

Even with Public Safely 
officers maintaining patrols 
throughout campus and the stale 
and borough police pau-olling the 
surrounding areas, many 
students have trouble feeling 
secure. 

In the wake of several these 
recent incidents, students, 
especially those living off 
campus, are changing their 
behavior 

"I used to go out at night by 
myself, but now I make sure I 
get everything 1 need to get done 
during the day. That way 1 don't 
need to go out at night," said 
senior Selin;i ,\hmed. 



Celebrating over 70 years as a student nezvspaper 



Sports Commentary: 

If Abbott and Costello had to do their act today 



hy Rodney Sherman 
Disgruntled Itasehall I' an 

"I Icy Ahboll, since you're Uic 
maiutiicr ol this baseball team, 
how about introducing me to 
some ()! the players .'" 

"CVTtainly I'll uilrochicc you to 
Uic boys. Let's see. on the bases 
wc have Jones on first-" 

"You mean Who, what's a 



matter, can't you remember the 
routme.'" 

"Well the team chanjicd over 
the olT-season, Who got tied up 
in a paiimony suit in San Diego. 
Ihey ligure the trial will last all 
summer. We called up .lones 
from triple A." 

"Ahhh. 1 see. well just pick it 
up at second bitse" 

"Second base? That would be 



Smith." 

"Smith.' What happen to 
What, you remember, I'd say 
Who's on second and you'd say 
'No, What's on .second."" 

"What's gone, lie hit ..^24 
with 26 homers and 10.^ RBI's 
last yeiu". Became a free agent 
and signed with a west coast 
team for millions, we couldn't 
aiford to keep him." 







FOUR 

snR 



^X^PHW 



•*•• 



226-8881 



Sun-Wed 11AM-Midnight 
Thurs 11 AM- 1AM 
Fri-Sat 11AM-2AM 



327 W. MAIN ST. CLARION, PA 



September 
Special 

Two 12" Cheese 
Pizza 



•••• 



Oniv $7.99 



lUppi 



o UUlh piZZdb 



We have 2 sizes of pizza 

to choose from: 

12" 8 slices 

16" 12 slices 
Q^ 

6 different kinds of Subs 

Ham&Cheese Meatball Sub 
Steak & Cheese Pizza Sub 

Italian Sub Veggie Sub 



FOUR Dinnpr 
STAR L^'""^' 

WHA for two 

Only $6.00 

PLUS TAX 

Includes 12" one-item pizza 
plus 2 cups of Pepsi 

ii"»ip.) if iveiy >-irf only f «pire5 g.SO'On 



FOUR 
STAR 
PtZZA 

nm 



Sub 
for two 

Only $4.50 



f'UlS TAX 

Includes BIG 12" SUB plus 
2 cups of Pepsi 

limileddelive'v n^^;^ df^ly Expires. ftSO/DS 



^ Dinner 
wnA' for four 

Only $8.25 

PLUS TAX 

Includes 16" one-item pizza 
plus 4 cups of Pepsi 

hmdeti debvery aiea only Expnes 9/30/f(3 



"How 'bout third, is I Don't 
Know still on third?' 

"I Don't Know, didn't you 
hear? He was at home 
somewhere in Latin America and 
the government there was 
overthrown. He's the dictator 
there now. We picked up old 
man Walker olf wiiivers to cover 
third until I Don't know gets 
overthrown." 

"You have to have those 
outfielders. Why iind Because." 

"Why is serving lime for his 
fourth DIJI conviction, then it's 
off to the Betty I'\>rd clinic for 
his other problems." 

"Because?" 
"Hxpansion draft." 

"The pitcher. Tomorrow, is he 
here?" 

"On the di.sabled list, shut his 



throwing hand in the door of a 
taxi cab. At least that's what 
we're telling the press." 

"The catcher. Today, he was 
always a solid player, what's the 
dciil with him?" 

"Holding out for a new 
contract, won't play unless we 
up the money." 

" Why iuid Because gone. Who 
in court. What in California. 
I'oday pouting about money, I 
Don't Know lost in central 
America, this te<im is a bunch of 
siTiuigers, and you know what, I 
DON'TGIVEADARN!" 

"What was that?" 

"I said I don't give a dam." 
"Oh yeah, our former 
shortstop. He's in charge of fjin 
relations now." 




Sports Information photo 
Clarion University's 1993 Integra, Pepsi, Wilson Golf 
Classic winners (from L-R): Denny Painter, Ed Grejda, Greg 
Wolf and Vince Grejda. The tournament which benefits 
Clarion's Waldo S. Tippin Athletic Scholarship Fund, raised 
a record total of $29,000. 



ONE DISCOUNT COUPON PER WASH 



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$1 .00 OFF any Touch Free Wash 

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Purchase Wash at Office 

Between 8AM & 6PM 

Regular With Coupon 

$4.00 . Wash & Rinse S3.00 

S5.00 Wash, Wax, & Rinse S4 00 

$6 00 Wash, Wax, & Spot tree S5 00 

S7 00 Deluxe Wash S6 00 

One Discount Coupon Per Wash 
Otier Expires May 31, 1994 



CAR 



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~ «&«!«:*»««■ tsBWiwii* imsi-uiatt 




Call 



Volume 74, Issue 3 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 23, I9<>3 






Issue 



Parking woes 
Cars, cars every wf«?re and notj 
a place to park • Pg- 5 1 



Lifestyles 

Semester abroad 

Explore a sunny island, an( 
get credits for it . , pg. i 1 



Sports 



Eagles 0-2 

Slow start sends Goldei 
Eagles home winless, . .pg. I9j 



Clarion's 

Weather Outlook I 



Thursday; 
Friday: 



Cloudy skies, 
high 74 
l%tly sunny, 
high 70 



Saturday: Mostly sunny, 

high 72 
Sunday: Mostly 

cloudy,high 75 
Monday: Brcezy, mild 

high 74 
Tuesday: Cloudy, rain, 

high 70 
Wednesday: Sunny, wanner 

high 75 



Index 



Commenlar>' 

News , 

TV Guide 

Ufesfyles 

lintertainment 

Sports 

Oassifieds 



Pg-2 
Pg-5 

pg. 10| 

pg m 
pg. m 

pg- 23 



Recent incidents do not show an 
upward trend in crime, some say 



hy Sarah Cunningham 
Contrihuting Writer 

An incidcni at Cjunpbcll Mall 
last Wednesday, Sept. 15, led to 
the arrest ol Robert liric 
Kejuiiey, of Altoonii, on charges 
of resisting arrest, a second- 
degree mi.sdemeanor; disorderly 
conduct, a third degree 
misdemeanor; criminal mi.schief. 
a summary offense; and 
underage consumption, also a 
.summary' offen.se. 

According to Ben Vessa, a 
resident assistant in Campbell, a 
report was received at the front 
desk of the residence hall that an 
argument was in progress 
between a female and a mjile on 
die sevenUi fltx)r of the building. 
A resident on the floor said she 
observed Kearney, a non-student, 
displaying drunken and 
boisterous behavior, yelling 
obscenities and arguing with a 
femjile friend. 

Il took .several residents and 
appro.ximaiely half an hour to 
coax the victim outside the 
dorm. 

According to Vessa, Kearney 
continued badgering the 
residents and threw one girl to 
the pavement. Public Safely was 
immediately called. 

When the officer arrived at die 
scene, said Vessa, Kearney and 
the girl were sitting in a car in 
the parking lot. The officer asked 
die girl to step out of the car and 
questioned her 

As the officer was questioning 
her, Kearney also got out of the 
car. The officer asked him to get 
back in, but Keanicy rcfu.sed iuid 
began to w<'ilk away, fhe officer 
attempied lo grab the suspect's 
arm but the suspect began 
flailing his sums and screaming 
vulgarities at the officer, said 
Ve.s.sa. 

At one point, Kearney hit 
officer Keitli A. Kaschalk in die 
eye. The officer placed him 
under arrest, but had difficulty 
restraining him. 

Bv this time, another officer 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Cam 
Despite recent incidents, both on and near campus, local officials say it is too early to 
determine if this is a trend. This police car responded to a call on Wilson Ave. 

had arrived on the scene, and according to students and 



together they managed to 
handcuff him and put the suspect 
in the Public Safety car. Kejuney 
then began kicking at the rear 
passenger window of the car, 
said Vessa. 

Kearney also called officers 
racists and referred to a female 
Public Safety officer in vulgar 
terms, Ves.sa said. Kearney later 
told police he had drank 10 shots 
of tequila and diree beers before 
the incident. 

Kearney was held ovemight in 
Clarion county jail and released 
on his own recognizance, lie 
failed to show up for a 
preliminary hearing and a 
warrant has been issued for his 
iurest. 

Despite many recent incidents, 
including this one, crime hasn't 
really increased on campus. 



officials. 

"Crime always increases when 
school starts because the 
population doubles, but 1 don't 
see any significant u^end suuting 
diis ye;u-," Chief R. liric Shaefier 
of the Clarion Borough Police 
said. According to criminal 
statistics, the particular age 
bracket from 17-24 has the 
highest number of victims and 
criminals, siiid Shaetfer. 

The director of University 
Relations, Ron Wilshire. said 
that "although there may be a 
slight increa.se in the number of 
incidents over last vear. it is still 
early to determine if this is a 
trend. As witnessed by recent 
national news reports, we are 
living in an increasingly violent 
.swiety." 

Wilshire urizes evervone to. 



"lake common sense 
precautionary measures when 
they walk at night, including 
walking in pairs, traveling wiih 
friends and staying in well- 
lighted itfeas." 

l:ven with Public Safety 
officers maintaining patrols 
throughout cmnpus and the state 
and borough police patrolling the 
surrounding areas, many 
students have trouble feeling 
secure. 

In the wake ol several these 
recent incidents, students, 
especially those living off 
campus, are changing their 
beha\ior. 

"I used to go out at night by 
my.self, but now I make sure I 
get everydnug 1 need to get done 
during the day. That way 1 don t 
need to go out at night." said 
.senior Seliii.i Ahmed 



Cdtbraiing over 70 years as a student nezvspape. 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Page 3 



Opinion 



The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chief 

Alan Vaughn 

Managing Editor 

Rodney Sherman 

News Editor 

Amy Gerkin 

Lifestyle Editor 

Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 
Ray Henderson 
Photography Editor 
Samantha White 
Ad Design 
Chris Clouse 
Advertising Manager 
Brigitte Josefczyk 
Circulation Editor 

& Interim 

Business Manager 

Hans Dovenspike 

Copy/Design Editor ., 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accdpt 
contributions from any source, 
hut reserve the right to edit all 
opy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
(.'(iitorial copy is 12:00 p.m. on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials arc those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion t^f 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
arc due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity F-ee and 
ndvcrtisino revenue. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 23S0 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch. ..$5.50 

Classiricd Ads...$1.00 for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $.50 

Suhscription.s 

Semester... $7.(M> 

Academic Year...$10.00 

The Clarion 
Call is 

printed on 

recycled 

ncHsprinl 



w 




ThewayI see l 

Phottgraphy Editor 



IT 



The one my 

mother warned 

me about 

1 have a simple philosophy 
about life: to enjoy life to the 
fullest potential without hurting 
others. I believe that in life, each 
person must face a series of 
obstacles that brings us to a 
better appreciation and 
understanding of life. By 
conquering these obstacles, we 
mature and learn from our 
experiences. The ones most 
important are the painful 
experiences. If we do not learn, 
then we are doomed to repeat 
our mistakes. 

1 learned many of my lessons 
during my college years. I 
graduated in May and take with 
me more than what I learned in 
the classrooms of Clarion 
University I was very innocent 
when I arrived here, four ye^ys 
ago. 1 still .see my friends that I 
made the first semester of my 
freshman year while living at 
Givan Hall. They are amazed 
when they realize how much I 
have changed. So many thing > 
have happened to change me, 
good and bad. 1 have crossed 
many bridges to become the 
person that 1 am now, mature and 
strong. But when I look back, I 
remember the one lesson that 
almost killed me, physically, 
mentally and emotionally. 

One year and ten months ago, 1 
was raped in Wilkinson Hall 
after a fraternity party. This is 
my side of the story, although I 
am sure his is very different. 

1 went to the party with two of 
my closest female friends. The 
one friend dates a brother of the 
fraternity, whom I also 
considered to be a close friend. I 
had a great time at the party. 
Unfortunately, I had t(xi much to 
drink. My friends wanted to go 
to CABS, but I was t(w drunk to 
no. I wa.s ()nlv 19 ve.'U'.s old at the 



time and my condition was 
terrible. I could hardly walk, let 
alone dance. Since I lived so far 
off campus, I wanted to walk 
home as soon as possible (I 
never drink and drive). My 
friends left me behind, figuring I 
would catch up later. I never 
made it. I was raw meat in a 
shark tank and too innocent to 
realize it. I stood in the doorway, 
blurry-eyed, looking for 
someone I knew to walk me 
home. I did not think it was safe 
for me to walk home alone. 

Finally, 1 saw a familiar face in 
the crowd. I asked him if he 
would mind walking me home. I 
wanted a gentleman to walk with 
me, not touching me, to my door. 
I emphasized the point that he 
was not welcome inside, but 1 
would appreciate his assistance 
in getting me there. He agreed to 
the terms and promised not to 
touch me. 

Off we went, trodding slowly 
down the sueet. lie was getting 
hungry and suggested we stop 
for a bite to eat. While we were 
waiting, he decided that he 
would rather goto CABS. He 

(Cont. on page 4) 



Wow, what a week! The 
NAFTA debate is coming to a 
head, the president unveiling the 
national health care plan on 
national TV, Russian power 
struggles between Boris Yeltsin's 
reformers and Alexander Rutskoi's 
legislature. It was a really great 
week for news. 

Such a shame that the members 
of the Clarion academic 
community are too busy to worry 
about these important world- 
shaping events. (No, I'm not 
going to rail about student apathy. 
That subject could make up 15 or 
20 editorials in and of itself.) The 
reason that Clarionites can't be 
worried about the news is because 
recently they have had to be 
extremely worried about their own 
personal safety. 

The number of violent acts 
which have occurred on or near 
campus to date this^ s^m^ter >s .; 
very disturbing. Physical assaults, 
sexual assaiiilts, platn bid nasitiness*." 
and violence. What happened to 
the relatively peaceful and friendly 
Clarion of years past? One of the 
rea.sons I (and many others) came 
to Clarion was because of the 
peaceful atmosphere. People 
always figured that things like 
these only happened in the city. 
What happened? 

Where Clarion got this recent 
mean streak from I do not know. 
What 1 do know is that we've got 
to start watching out for ourselves. 
What can we as citizens do to 



curtail these acts of violence? We 
can learn to protect ourselves. 
Public Safety and local police do 
an admirable job, but 
unfortunately they can't be all 
places at all times. We must 
therefore learn to do for ourselves. 

Buy Mace or an equivalent, such 
as CS gas. These may be 
purchased at most department 
stores in the home security .section. 
The best ones to buy are those 
which contain an indelible dye. It 
makes it easier for the police to 
find your attacker. 

Another suggestion: with your 
keys in your hand, make a fist, 
with the keys sticking out between 
your fingers. Even the smallest 
victim can do some real damage to 
an attacker with this ersatz brass 
knuckle. 

If these methods of self-defense 
don't seem right for you, get a 
pocket-sized airhorn or a dye gun. 
1'hese cVuse no physical damage 
ftj ^oiiV attaclter, feut they will 
definitely scare him (or her) off. 

Last and most important, never 
go out at night alone. It doesn't 
matter if you're a big, strapping 
football player or if you're 5-foot- 
one and 12.5 pounds soaking wet, 
there is safety in numbers. 

If we try hard enough and take 
the proper precautions, we can 
make ourselves safe. If we can all 
work together to combat violence 
both on and off campus, we can 
make everyone safe. 

Have a good (and safe) autumn. 







QONTRiwniovi to m mvm^ mm pvah, of coutse/" 



Reader Responses 



The real world 

Dear Editor: 

The mission of colleges and 
universities is to prepare yo^p 
people for the "real world", yet 
we require little, if any, contact 
with it during a student's four- 
year tenure. In the classroom we 
talk about the "real world", we 
analyze the "real world", we put 
it in a petri dish and look at it 
from under a microscope, and 
yet when the time comes to live 
in it, many students know how to 
take care of themselves but do 
not know how to take care of 
each other. 

Being aware of the needs of 
the community in which one 
lives contributes as much to a 
person's well-being as physical 
health, social acceptance, and 
financial stability. As Bill 
Clinton said in his inaugural 
speech, "In serving we recognize 



a simple but powerful truth: we 
need each other. And we must 
care for one another." If we don't 
take care of each other, who 
will? At a time when we want to 
■cin spending in welfare and 
social programs, and are 
demanding less government 
control, who else can lake care 
of us better than ourselves? 

By participating in community 
service projects, eidier in a group 
or individually, students learn 
first-hand the lessons in life that 
cannot be taught in a classroom. 
For example, two Clarion 
students work with children 
whose parents participate in a 
weekly support group to help 
them deal with abusive 
tendencies. All over our campus 
there are examples of how 
students change the lives of not 
only those whom they work 
with, but their own lives as well. 
It's not something they brag 
about and most of the time it's 



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not something they get credit for, 
either in class or out, but it's 
enough for them that they know 
they have helped to make this 
WiM-ld^ better ^lace for someone 
elsc^-'': "'■" 

It is time for Clarion 
University to recognize the 
importance of community 
service, and to do more than urge 
its students to discover and 
participate in their particular 
field of interest. It's time to do 
more than just tell them how 
wonderful it will make them 
feel, or that it will lode good on 
a resume. It's time to give them 
real credit for it. Very few 
classes implement any form of 
community service into the 
criteria. CUP should make a 
commitment to the importance 
of community service by 
supporting cooperative class- 
room teaching and service- 
learning. Then we'll actually be 
preparing students for the "real 
world" that we are always 
lecturing them about. 

Lynn Haraldson is the Director 
of United Campus Ministry and 
the Community Coordinator of 
Into the Streets 



What about 
non-smokers 



Dear tditon 

It is disturbing to me that I 
must write to the school 
newspaper because the school 
will not move forward and face 
reality. Within the past decade, 
research has documented fmding 
after finding that cigarette 
smoking is harmful to your 
health. But, if you want to smoke 
just pay this cigarette tax and 
you can feed your addiction. 
What about me! I don't smoke! 
But I am forced to breath more 
toxins everyday than the 
average smoker because smcricers 
have more rights to the air than 
me. When a smoker is smoking a 
cigarette they exhale more than 
they inhale. As a result, the 
person who is not smoking is 
passively inhaling more 
carcinogenic toxins than the 
person who is smoking. Ralston 
Hall is one of many residence 
halls on Clarion University's 
campus that permits smoking. 
Why haven't the people running 
this university been subjected to 
the same alarming truth as the 
students about smoke and most 
importantly, second hand 



smoke? They say, "You can 
smoke in your room if your 
rdommate doesn't mind." 
Statements such as this oiie ring 
mere ignorance or is it apathy? 
Anyone who has been through 
any basic science class knows 
that the only time air is confined 
to one space is in a vacuum. 

All published results from 
tobacco studies have 
demonstrated a high risk for 
health problems by being 
exposed to second han^ smoke. 
This information is being 
circulated and lectured in our 
very own classrooms here on 
campus. Why doesn't Clarion 
University practice what it 
preaches? 

Here at Clarion University we 
do have some restrictions on 
smoking. You are not permitted 
to smoke in any of the buildings. 
But, I can tell you that most of 
the time you can walk into any 
building and the stench of 
cigarettes is in the air. Our 
professors smoke in their offices, 
and some while you are standing 
there. If you report an incident 
like this you will see little signs 
put up. But, the most important 
ingredient is missing. We need to 
educate our superiors. Smoking 
is an addiction. If you are going 
to have this policy you must 
enforce it. 

Name withheld by request 

Welcome from 



AASU 



Dear Editor: 

On behalf of the African 
American Student Union, I 
would like to welcome all 
inccMning freshmen students and 
returning students, especially 
my African American sisters and 
brothers. The African American 
Student Union Office is located 
at 265 Gemmell Student 
Complex. The office hours are 9 
a.m. to 3 p.m. You can slop by 
anytime to share jM-oblems or just 
to talk. Remember the AASU is 
here for you, so we need your 
support and ideas. Also, there 
will be a general txxly meeting 
for everyone on Thursday, 
September 23 at 8 p.m. in Pierce 
Auditorium. Please come out and 
support us! 



Tiffany Tatum is a junior 
political science major uiid vice 
president of political actions 



f Leave me 

■■ ■■ ■ i. ,* ■• 

my dreams 

Dear editor: 

I would like to thank Mr. 
Barlow for his positive 
comments regarding the 
accreditation of our alma-mater. 
The Middle States 

reaccreditaiion is indeed a "ray 
of hope" despite the pervasive 
attitude among many other 
professors at CUP. 

I am a returning adult student 
and a senior majoring in 
communication. And, 1 am 
starting to dream of the 
possibilities of my future. But, 
sometimes it is difficult when 
semester after semester I hear 
my professors criticizing the 
university and its faculty. 

One professor recently stated 
in front of our class that he felt 
like wearing black until all 
faculty members from the dean 
on up are replaced. I have also 
heard many other negative 
comments pertaining to CUP 
faculty from other professors. 
Perhaps they have a valid point. " 
But, I don't feel that the 
classroom is the place for diem 
to vent their anger. 

As I said before, I have begun 
to dream about my future, based 
on the potential of the education 
I have received here at CUP. By 
discrediting our university and 
the value of its degree certain 
faculty are making it difficult for 
students to dream. It is hard to 
take pride in our school and our 
education when the very 
professors we receive our 
education from are undermining 
the value of our education. 
Maybe it is time for faculty to 
work out its differences with 
other faculty and leave these 
problems out of the classroom. 
And afterall, doesn't the quality 
of education depend more upon 
the quality of instruction given 
by our instructors than on past 
budget blunders of our 
administration? 

Hopefully everyone will share 
the sentiments of Mr. Barlow 
that with the budget problems 
hopefully behind us and the 
Middle States reaccreditaiion, 
now is the time for more 
attention to be spent on teaching 
and learning. And if I may, I 
would like to add dreaming to 
die agenda 

Daniel J. Ileichner i% a 
senior unnmunication major 




Page 4 



- 1 



Tlic OaHon Call: Thursday; September 23, 1993 



Hide Park 

(cont. from pg. 2) 



Uicd 10 talk inc into goinj:, but I 
was t(H) tired. My condition was 
i!Ctling worse as lime passed. I 
knew that in 10 minutes or so 1 
would be ready to pass out, 
either at my place or in 
someone's yard. He suggested 
tiiat I go back to his room and 
rest while he went to CABS. 
I'hat way I would be more sober 
to walk home. Since I had just 
met him that night, I refused, 
even though he seemed like a 
nice guy. I did not want to send 
any mixed signals, only wanting 
an escort home. He swore up and 
down that I would be safe there. 
He told me that his roommate 
was gone. No one would be there 
to hurt or bother me. He was 
going to leave and kx:k the door 
behind him. He offered me a safe 
haven. Whether or not, at this 
point, he had decided to have sex 
with me, 1 do not know. 
Unfortunately, I put my trust in 
him. My life and safety were in 
his hands. 

We stumbled on to his dorm 
rtx)m. Upon entering the room, 1 
realized my dreadful mistake. He 
did not warrant my blind faith. 
He was immediately all over me. 
All I can remember screaming is 
"No, No! Stop! Please. . .just 
stop!" I did not know what to do. 
I was tot) weak from the alcohol 
to stop him physically, even 
though he is not a large person. 
At one point, before the actual 
rape occurred, I had an 
opportunity to escape. I was not 
quick enough to make it to the 
d(X)r. 1 lost my last hope. No one 
was going to save me. My cries 
meant nothing to him. Then he 
raped me. I was hysterical, 
thrashing wildly at him. I truly 
believe that his mind was flying 
on automatic pilot until this 
point. He pulled away, gazing in 
horror at what he had done to 
me. 

He left the room. 1 think he 



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went to the bathroom. At thai 
moment in time, I did not care. 
My only concern was getting the 
hell out of there. . .and fast! 

The reality of what had 
happened sobered mc up enough 
to get dressed, go downstairs and 
call my neighbor to come and 
get me. He immediately came to 
pick me up. He and I have never 
discussed that night since, even 
though I owe him my life. The 
rapist had followed me 
downstairs but saw me crying on 
the phone. Thankfully, he ran 
away, leaving me alone in a slate 
of uncontrolled sobbing. 

After that nighi, I experienced 
a series of mental hardships in 
my personal life. I lost my best 
friend and my relationships with 
men were terrible. Consequently, 
my grades suffered from my lack 
of concentration. My junior year 
at Clarion was the hardest year 
of my life. As if that was not bad 
enough, others who knew about 
the rape questioned me about the 
validity of my accusations. They 
did not want to believe anything 
so terrible could have happened. 
I still do not know if they believe 
me or not. It no longer matters. It 
is over for everyone in this world 
but me. I re-lived the experience 
every time I saw him on campus 
or when I walked into Wilkinson 
Hall. 

He did not just have sex with 
me, he was a thief. He stole the 
autonomy I have over my body. 
He stole my self-confidence and 
self-worth. With that, he stole 
my feeling of security. Above all 
else, he stole my desire and 
happiness of life. He has not 
only violated me once, but will 
affect all my future decisions in 
life: Who will I go out with? 
Who are my friends? Can I 
protect myself? Can I feel 
anything but pain again? 

Through counseling at the 
Rape Crisis Center, I have 
overcome many of my fears. I 
am no longer afraid to go to 
parties or walk on campus. He 
did not win. I took back Iny 
spirit for life. I survived. 

One year after my rape, I was 
invited lo Slippery Rock 
University to give a presentation. 
I was invited by a friend of mine 
who is an RA at North Hall, an 
all female residence hall. She 
was presenting an alcohol 
awareness meeting. The topic 
also included rape, therefore I 
was the guest speaker. I told my 
story to approximately 50 
women. They all gazed at me, 
spellbound and awesU"uck, their 
mouths gaping open. Some of 



the women even cried. 

At the end of my speech, 1 
answered their questions. The 
main question was why I did not 
press charges agiiinst my rapist. 
One reason was my age. 1 was 
19 years-old and had been 
drinking. 1 was afraid the police 
would fine me for underage 
drinking. That is not true. It does 
not matter what condition I was 
in at the Ume of the rape. Just the 
fact that I had been drinking 
enough beer for the slightest 
buzz constitutes rape since I was 
not capable of making rational 
decisions while under the 
influence. I was also afraid of 
pressing charges, not knowing 
what he ...would say. I chose not 
to involve campus security 
because I had no real evidence. It 
was his word against mine. 

The women at Slippery Rock 
gave me back my self-respect. I 
felt courageous for going and 
telling them my story. They 
supported me in that they all 
believed I was a victim. They 
cared. This is my story. After 
my "lesson in life," I learned that 
I am not alone. One out of every 
four women will be raped 
sometime during their life. 
Everyone knows someone who 
has been victimized, male or 
female, but may not know about 
the rape. The only way to stop 
rape is to bring it out into the 
open. We all need to learn that 
when someone says "no" to sex, 
it is "no," not "maybe, I think I 
need to be convinced." 

I encourage anyone who has 
been raped to seek help. You 
have one year to file charges. 
Once you do file charges, you 
remain anonymous during the 
investigation. You can contact 
the Slate or Borough Police, 
Campus Security, the Rape 
Crisis Center, the Clarion 
Hospital or the University 
Infirmary. You need to get 
medical assistance in case the 
rapist had any sexually 
transmitted diseases. 

Do not be scared to go seek 
help. They are there to help you. 
Please remember you are not 
alone, tell a friend what 
happened; they could have been 
in a similar situation. 

rhe longer you wail lo deal 
with your emotions of anger, 
beuayal, hau-ed, regret and .self- 
blame, ihe closer you come lo 
denying the rape ever t(X)k place. 
If you deny it, the rapist won. 
You are a victim. 
This student graduated in May. 
Her name is withheld by 
request. 



Dave Barry 

The federal government is looking 
out for us in truly remarkable ways 

ti993 Miami VeraU 



There arc time when, as a 
taxpayer, I just have lo put my 
head between my legs and weep 
with joy at the benefits I am 
receiving from the federal 
government ( "Official Motto: 
This Motto Alone Cost $13.2 
Billion"). 

You'll feel the same way when 
1 share some news items sent in 
by alert readers concerning 
government agencies servicing 
the public in ways that the public 
could never have thought of 
itself without the aid of powerful 
narcotics. (As is often the case 
when discussing the government, 
I need to stress that I am not 
making any of these item up.) 

Our first item concerns: EAR 
CANDLES. You may recall that 
a few months back I wrote a 
column about ear candles, an old 
home remedy consisting of wax- 
covered cotton cones that you 
insert into your ears, after whic|j 
you set them (the cones) on fireVs 
This is supposed to create a draft 
that sucks the wax out of your 
ears. I got a lot of letters in 
response to that column; many 
people claimed they've used ear 
candles for years with great 
results; some people claimed the 
whole thing is a fraud, and all 
the "earwax" is actually 
produced by the candles. 

Then several alert readers sent 
mc an article from the July 29 
Columbus (Ohio) Dispatch, 
written by Graydon Hambrick 
and headlined: Federal Agents 
wSeize Ear Candles in Raid. The 
article stales that on July 28, 
U.S. Marshals and agents of the 
Food and Drug Administration 
"swooped in" to a Columbus 
health store and "seized about 
100 candles." An FDA 
spokesperson said the candles 
were seized because they did not 
have FDA approval, which is 
required for " anything used for 
treatment of prevention of 
disease in humans or animals." 
An official said that the raid was 
part of a wider ear-candle 
crackdown. 

I, personally, am sleeping 
better, knowing something is 
being done about this menace. 
I'd like to see the FDA program 
dramatized in a TV series, "Ear 
Candle Patrol," wherein each 
week federal agents would 
confront dangerous, law- 
violation health-store clerks 
(Look out. Matt! She's got a 
L'inseni! root!"). 

But before we do anything. 



let's salute the Occupational 
Safely and Health 

Adtninistration (OSHA) office in 
Idaho for its prompt action 
regarding: Improperly Attired 
Rescue Personnel. Here's what 
happened, according to an article 
in The Idaho Statesman written 
by Martin S. Johncox and sent in 
by Joe Auvil: 

On May 11, two employees of 
DeBest Inc., a plumbing 
company, were working at a 
construction site in Garden City, 
Idaho, when they heard a 
backhoe operator yell for help. 
They ran over, and found that the 
wall of a trench — which was 
NOT dug by DeBest — had 
collapsed on a worker, pinning 
him under dirt and covering his 
head. 

"We could hear muffled 
screams," said one of the DeBest 
employees. 

So the men jumped into the 
trench and dug the victim out, 
quite possibly saving his life. 

What do you think OSHA did 
about this? Do you think it gave 
the rescuers a medal? If so, I can 
see why you are a mere lowlife 
taxpayer, as opposed to an 
OSHA executive. What OSHA 
did - - remember, I am not 
making this up — was FINE 
DEBEST INC. $7,875. Yes. 
OSHA said that the two men 
should not have gone into the 
trench without 1) putting on 
approved hard hats, and 2) 
taking steps to insure that other 
trench walls did not collapse, 
and water did not seep in. Of 
course this might have resulted 
in some discomfort for the 
suffocating victim ("Hang in 
There! We should have the 
OSHA trench-seepage- 

prevention guidelines here 
within hours!"). But that is the 
price you pay for occupational 
health and safety. 

Unfortunately, after DeBesl 
Inc. complained lo Idaho Sen. 
Dirk Kemplhorne, OSHA 
backed off on the fines. 
Nevertheless this incident should 
serve as a warning to would-be 
rescuers out there to comply with 
ALL federal regulations, 
including these that are not yet 
in existence before attempting to 
rescue people. Especially if these 
people are in, say, a burning 
OSHA office. 

Dave Barry is a syndicated 
columnist with the Miami 
Herald 



The Clarion Call; Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Page 5 



News 



Student parking woes continue 



by Katie Zaikoski 
News Writer 



Aggravating and frustrating, 
that is how Clarion students 
describe the university's current 
parking situation. With the 
increase of freshman enrollment, 
the number of drivers on campus 
has grown, according to 
enrollment and car registalion 
records, making the number of 
available parking spots decline 
steadily. 

Driving students must endure a 
vicious battle of finding a spot to 
park their vehicle during the 
busy school week. 

Parking lot W, which was 
designed strictly for freshman 
parking, was added last year to 
eliminate some of the havoc that 
parking on a small campus 
arouses. 

However, in order for the 
parking congestion to decrease, 
freshman must be willing to park 
their cars in the designated lot, 
and walk. "I think that most of 
the parking problems are due to 
the fact that students don't park 
where they are supposed lo. 
Students want to park where they 
want to park and if they don't get 
the spot right in front of their 
class, then there is a parking 
problem," said Charles Duke, 
Dean of the College of 
Education. Duke also said that 
he too, is a victim of parking 
tickets and has received three in 
five years. "If you don't get here 
early and try to park after 8:30, 
it's very difficult to park your car 
and find a place that you want," 
he added. 

According to Public Safety 
Parking Enforcement chief Eric 
Grafton, in previous years there 
was ample parking for all 
students, he said, adding 
"Actually, there is enough 
parking if students would park 
properly, and if they would 
schedule properly." Grafton 
pointed out that public safety is 
not in charge of providing 
parking, they only enforce the 
laws that the Paiking Committee 
establishes. 

Chair of the Parking Conunittee 
Lori Norris said that the 
committee realizes the 
complaints of student drivers and 
they are currently trying to 



upgrade the situation. "We are in 
the process of getting one or two 
student senate representatives 
because they have a right to be a 
part of this process. We need to 
juggle around parking spots and 
make some of the unused staff 
parking available to students." 

Presently, there are 23 parking 
lots with the majority of those 
lots being for employees. 
Students are alloted six of those 
23 and there is also one special 
permit lot. 

Clarion students feel that there 



is definitely a need for some 
parking revisions and solutions. 

"They need to build more 
parking lots. You go to class and 
move your car and you come 
back and your spot's gone. It's a 
lot easier to park at night. 
Employees have a lot more 
spaces and when there's no 
where to park you park in their 
spot and then you get ticketed," 
says freshman Heath 
Coppenhager. 

Students have resorted to 
desperate measures in order to 



park their vehicle, including 
parking illegally and paying 
heavy fines. Larry Brosius, 
manager at Wendy's, said on the 
average, they ticket at least 8 
people per week for parking in 
their customer only lot. Brosius 
said about 75% of those Uckets 
are given to Clarion students 
with the fine set at $15.00. 

"People park in our lot before 
we're even open. If we're not 
open, they're not our customers 
so we call public safety. They 
take their chances, but a $15.00 




Rodney L. Sherman / Clarion Call 
Student sore point: 8:55 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 21, Parking lot "Y,"(above) a student and 
employee lot located near Still Hall is filled to capacity. While students continue to enter 
the lot, a public safety officer has already issued three tickets. 




Rodney L. Shernnan / Clarion Cal 
8:55 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 21, parking lot "F," an "employee only" lot located near lot "Y" 
and Still Hall, 21 parking spaces are still empty. 



chance is pretty steep to me," he 
said. 

While not all students resort to 
illegal parking, their frustrations 
still run deep. "I'm a freshmen 
transfer student and they made 
me get a freshmen parking 
ticket. So now 1 have to park far 
away. I don't understand why 
there is meter parking. Most of 
them are not being used at all. If 
they would take away the 
meters, then I'd park there," said 
freshman elementary art 
education major Stacy Meyers. 

However, on-campus students 
are not the only ones who are 
having trouble parking. The 
commuter students are also 
having a great difficulty getting a 
space to park also. Senior music- 
education major Robyn Young 
said that it's very hard for her to 
park this semester. "I've been 
here for seven years and I've 
never had this much trouble. 
They should limit the number of 
people who use cars to only 
upperclassmen and freshmen 
commuter students. I arrive one 
and a half hours early for my 
class, just so I can find a space. 

"Teachers should be assigned a 
number and be expected to park 
in the same spot all year, then 
open the unused spaces to 
students," Young said. 

Dianna Maier, a med/tech 
biology major who commutes 
daily from Oil City, said, "If you 
get here any later than 8:05, you 
.spend a half hour driving around, 
looking for a space, and it really 
sucks." 

Suggestions for more parking 
spaces have been circulating 
around the campus for years. 
.lunior psychology major Aaron 
Dunbar proposed a belter 
parking lot for a project in his 
English class. "We proposed a 
six to eight story parking garage 
over parking lot C. 
"We even went as far as to 
consult construction companies 
about it. They estimated about 
1.2 million per story to park 
roughly 150 cars per level, said 
Dunbar. 

While suggestions are still 
being brought to attention, and 
everyone thinks they have a 
solution, the piu-king situation is 
still chaoiu filled with S5.00 
fines aiul imliappy students. 



Page '6 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



id\ 



TheClarlpn Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Page 7 



Possiblity of re-charter within five years 



CUP chapter of Delta Chi to disband 



by Chad lirifigs 
News Writer 



The Clarion Univcrsily 
chapter of Delta Chi national 
Iralemity which was lorined in 
1983 and formally chartered in 
1986, recently dispanded their 
natioiiiil chiirter. The chapter had 
run into debt problems after a 
fire which destroyed their 
original Fraternity House in the 
spring of 1991. 

It was decided the house be 
immediately rebuilt. It was then 
that the chapter started to run 
into debt. The chapter was 
having difficulty keeping up 
with their national dues, but a 
last ditch effort was still made to 
keep the charter by having the 
chapter put on a payment plan 
for a year and a half but it failed. 

So it was decided by the 
chapter, that having no other 
alternatives, to dispand the 
charter, fraternity president Eric 
Feigel said. 

Feigel went on to say if the 
debt is payed off within five 



years, they will be able to 
recolonize at Clarion, and in 
turn, would have their charter 
returned. 

"It was m unfortunate situation 
that was brought upon us. No 
one at the chapter wanted this to 
happen, but we felt that it was 
inevitable," said Feigel. 

"We will not, however, lit the 
reputation that comes along with 
a local fraternity. We will 
continue to run community 
service programs and try to keep 
our reputation on good terms 
with the university," Feigel 
exphiined. 

Dave Crawford, a member of 
the fraternity, said, "We had no 
alternatives. The options were 
very limited, despite the efforts 
made by our national to work out 
our situation. It was a very 
unfortunate outcome." 

With the chapter disbanding 
from their national sponsership 
they will no longer be 
recognized by the Inter- 
Fraternity Council (IFC), or by 
Clarion University. 




Maggie Collarini / Clarion Call 
The Delta Chi house, located on RD#1 Clarion. Members of the fraternity have decided to 
disband the local chapter due to financial difficlties. 



It is university policy not to 
recognize greek organizations 
which are not recognized by 
their national chapters. Such 
situations usually prevent the 
unrecognized organization from 
using university falicities and 
equipment. 



John Postlewait, advisor to 
IFC, said, "I was pleased with 
what they did last semester, they 
had the highest grade point 
average of any fraternity on 
campus, and they also did a lot 
of philanthropic work, and IFC 
had nothing to do with the 



charter being disbanded." 

Patrick Alderdice, director of 
Ch^ter Services for Delta Chi's 
national office, could not be 
reached for comment on the 
local chapter's recent difficlties. 

The Clarion Delta Chi chapter 
has 26 active members. 



Three new security officers hired for library duty 



by Rodney L. Sherman 
News Editor 

Clarion University has hired 
three new, part-time, temporary 
security officers to patrol 
Carlson Library during the re- 
instated hours of 9 p.m. to 
midnight, Sunday through 



Thursday. 

The new officers are Walter 
Minich, Christine Eaker and 
Eugena Radaker. 

Radaker and Eaker are 
graduates of CUP. 

According to Dr. Ron 
Martinazzi, director of public 



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Safety, the new hirees will work 
in the library only. One officer 
will be on the second floor 
entrance, watching the entrance 
and exit. The other officers will 
be stationed on the third and 
fourth floors. The officers are 
expected to be working until the 
end of the semester at which a 
time the new arrangement will 
be evaluated. 

"They will be watching for 
vandalism, rowdiness, or 
anything of that sort," explained 
Martinazzi. 

According to a statement 
issued to the Call by Ron 
Wilshire, of university relations, 
"The student meetings and 



opinions voiced concerning the 
change in library hours 
persuaded the administration that 
a number of students wanted 
additional study time in the 
library. The additional study 
hours do not require regular 
library personnel, but the 
director of the library and the 
chair of the library faculty felt 
supervision of the library facility 
was required. 

"Along with the need for 
supervision, a policy that campus 
buildings cannot remain open 
without university employees 
and a desire to deter possible 
vandalism, three temporary, part- 
time security officers were hired 




Jamie Shropshire 

Oy\ner 



Images of the West 

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Textiles from Mexico 

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625 Main Street 

Clarion, PA 16214 

814/226-5513 



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to keep the building open." 

According to the statement, 
"The decision was made by the 
administration, including Library 
Director Gerald McCabe, Chair 
of Library Faculty Deon 
KnickerbcKker, President Diane 
Reinhard, Provost John Kuhn, 
Interim Vice President Wayne 
Key and Interim Assistant Vice 
Resident Tim Fogarty." 

The new security officers will 
be paid an hourly rate of $8.21. 

Student senate President Gara 
L. Smith, who lead the fight to 
have the hours re-instated, was 
satisfied with the decision. 

"I have been told by university 
officials that three security 
guards have been hired solely for 
the purpose of safety and 
protection of those utilizing the 
library facilities. 

"By having security guiirds, the 
issue of campus safely is also 
being addressed. The university 
and student senate is 
conjunctively working together 
to make this campus as well as 
Venango. camp«s -^.safe 
environment. 

"The university community 
will receive further notification 
reguarding campus .safety." 

Any suggestions should be 
forwarded to student senate, 
rtx)m 269, Gemmell Complex. 



News Feature 



CUP professor studies memory skills in older adults 



by H. A. Dovenspike 
Copy and Design Editor 

"I don't believe that one grows 
older. 1 think that what happens 
early on in life is that at a certain 
age one stands still and 
stagnates." This was the altitude 
expressed by T.S. Eliot in 1958, 
an attitude that has been 
changing during the past forty 
years. Changing, that is, with the 
help of people like Dr. Iseli 
Krauss of Clarion's Psychology 
Department. She has been 
interested during the last ten 
years in researching the affect of 
game expertise on older adults. 
Her research is based soley on 
the game of Bingo. 

In previous research and 
observations. Dr. Krauss has 
noted that older adults have an 
uncanny ability to perform the 
complex cognitive tasks involved 
in the playing of bingo, and that 
the.se skills are maintianed even 
after debilitating illnesses and 
cognitive degression. The game 
needs strong sorting and 
organizational skills, good 
memory storage and recall, as 
well as hand-eye coordination in 
the marking of the cards. 

Dr. Krauss' interest peaked 
when she realized how huge of a 
phenomenon the game of bingo 
was. The game draws seven 
billion players a week in the 
United States and is just as 
popular internationally. Chronic 
players participate five to seven 
nights-a-week, many spending 
upwards of fifty dollars per day. 
There are many reasons for 
playing bingo besides simple 
enjoyment such as relief from 
boredom and a need to play from 
an addictive point of view. 

Experts play using from 
twenty-four cards to as many as 
one hundred, according to Dr. 
Krauss; these people can keep 
track of all one hundred game 
cards(memorizing or knowing 
the whereabouts of 2400 
numbers) as easily as a novice 
can play three. The main 
drawing question for Dr. Krauss 



was this: If memory declines 
through aging, how is such 
expertise maintained? 

For those unfamiliar with the 
game of bingo, it involves a 
group of individuals ranging in 
size from ?> to 70,000. The 
actual game is played on cards 
with a grid of twenty-four 
numbers and one center "free" 
space. Numbers are called at 
random and if the player has the 
given number on their card, the 
number must be covered up with 
a marker. In the basic game, the 



Bingo Playing in Old Age," at 
the Fourth Biennial Cognitive 
Aging Conference in Atlanta in 
1992. 

That study focused on players 
between the ages of 19 and 85 
(average age of 48.5). This study 
found no significant correlation 
between age and amount of 
errors made. They did find that 
the more education an individual 
had, the fewer errors they would 
be likely to make. Errors were 
defined as omission(missing a 
number), comission(marking the 



experienced bingo players. 

Twenty-one younger adults 
were also recruited for the study. 
The subjects played five games 
on twelve cards at a time, each 
with increasing difficulty in tlie 
pattern required for winning (a 
sample of a complex pattern is 
pictured with Dr. Krau.ss). 

The study revealed through 
further testing that the younger 
participants were more likely to 
miss numbers on the most 
complex patterns than were the 
older adults. Both groups 




H. A. Dovenspike / Clarion Call 
Dr. Iseli Krauss, of CUP's psychology department, is conducting research studies that 
investigate the abilities of some older adults to simultaneously play 100 bingo cards. An 
enlarged card is pictured to Krauss' left. 



first player in the group to cover 
a row of numbers vertically or 
horizontally wins — there are 
hundreds of other variations to 
winning. In most bingo playing 
establishments, the winners will 
receive either a small prize or a 
sum of money. At some 
locations the winnings are in the 
thou.sands of dollars. 

For her first research project 
on bingo. Dr. Krauss and student 
assistant Lisa Henry presented 
the paper, "But They Keep on 
Playing: Errors of Omission in 



wrong numbers), and missing a 
"bingo"(a winning card). There 
were very few errors overall 
found in this study. According to 
Dr. Krauss these findings are 
counter to current theories in 
cognitive age research. 

In the second study (part of 
which was presented at the 
International Society for 
Behavioral Research in Recife, 
Brazil), a much more 
complicated design was enacted. 
Twenty older adults from the age 
of fifiy were recruited as being 



performed about the same on the 
simpler diagonal-horizontal- 
vertical patterned games. Other 
testing included the performing 
of other various cognitive tasks; 
such as memorizing and writing 
digits backward, figure-matching 
exercises, and the memorization 
and copying of complete bingo 
cards. 

In the last test only the older 
adults were able to get all 
twenty-four numbers correct. 
However, they performed poorly 
on the other tasks. 



Some other findings are that 
more errors are cotnmitted when 
playing fewer cards and that the 
older individucUs usu.'illy had less 
education, are more likely to 
play the game than the youngers, 
and were able to inaintJiin many 
more cards. Dr Krauss says that 
experience plays a larger role in 
this than cognitive abilities. 

All of the studies .so far have 
been funded out of Dr. Krauss' 
own pocket. She credits much 
a.ssistance for the last study to 
Paulo Ghisletta, Jennifer Landis, 
Jill Frenelli, and Thom 
Osterhout. 

Dr. Krauss worries a bit about 
the addictive affects of bingo as 
well as the fact that many people 
who can't afford it are going into 
debt because of it. Some 
jackpots do grow to very 
rewarding levels though. 

When her findings were 
presented at a recent gathering, 
strong interest was shown from 
other psychologists. A 
psychologist from Canada and 
one from New Orleans have 
approached her about setting up 
their own studies. 

For her next study. Dr. Krauss 
plans to use non-traditional, 
randomly generated number 
cards. 

These cards will cause the 
most experienced player to lose 
their edge over lesser players, 
she believes. She is still 
searching for expert bingo 
players. 

If you know of an expert or 
"super" bingo player that is 
interested in participating in this 
study, please contact Dr. Krauss' 
office in Harvey Hall, at 226- 
2295 (226-1991 answering 
machine). Both younger and 
older adults are needed for the 
study. 



Into the Streets 93-94 

Organizational Meeting 

Wednesday, Sept.29 

8:00 p.m. 

246 Gemmell 

Everyone welcome 



rsT-- 



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Pages 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Hoover named to student 
seat on Board of Trustees 



hy Christy Williams 
S'ews Writer 



Brian lUwvcr has been niimed 
Ihc new student member ol 
CUP'S Board of Trustees. He is 
the son of Timothy and Linda 
Ikxnerol lladly, Pa. 

During the 1993 spring 
.semester. Hoover tilled out an 
apphcation, and after a campus 
interview by his peers, he was 
chosen along with two other 
students to go to Harrisburg. 
Governor Robert Casey 
ultimately appointed fkx)ver the 
new member. 

"I have done a lot on campus, 
and those expierences have been 
invaluable to me. This is my 
chance to give back to Clarion. " 
said Hoover. " I hope to serve 
the interest of the student body 




Ray Henderson / Clarion Call 
New student trustee, Brian 
Hoover 

and always communicate with 
them." 

Hoover holds the only student 



seat on the eleven seat council. 

He is involved in several 
activities on campus including 
Alpha Phi Omega, Phi Fita 
Sisma and the orientation 
committee. He is also president 
of the Interhall Council. 

Hoover, a Political Science 
major, said, "This will be a 
perfect learning opportunity and 
it will help me in the future. If 
anyone has any concerns they 
care to share with me, I can be 
reached at 122 Ralston or 226- 
3771." 

Other members of Clarion's 
Board of Ttrustees include: Dr. 
Dana Still, Paul A. Weaver, 
Michael Keefer, Kim C. Kesner, 
Fred Mcllhattan, Lucy Tabler, 
Dr. SyedAli-Zaidi, Raleigh 
Robertson, Kenneth Gaudi and 



Joseph Harvey. 

Alcohol prevention effective if gender specific 



Public Safety 
Blotter 



The following is a brief synopsis of criminal investigations 
conducted by Public Safety for the week of Sept. 13, through Sept. 
19, 1993. 

At approximately 11:20 p.m. on Sept. 16, a non-student was cited 
for disorderly conduct and under-age drinking after Public Safety was 
called to a possible a.ssault which involved the non-student and his 
girlfriend. The alleged victim is a student at Clarion University. The 
suspect was lodged at the Clarion County Jail until the following 
morning when he was arraigned by District Justice LaPinto. 

An individual was slopped for operating his motor vehicle in an 
unsafe manner on Sept. 17, at approximately 1:10 a.m. The 
individual was cited for a stop sign violation and minors comsuption. 
The individual registered .08 on the BAC. 

On Sept. 17, at approximately 9:15 p.m., unknown persons smashed 
a large window at the end of the hallway (Northwest stairwell 
enterance) in Nair Hall. The incident is under investigation. 



If anyone has any information concerning these or other crimes, 
please contact Public Safety at 226-2111. 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Page § 



CPS- In some of the women's 
restrooms at Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute, bright, 
highly visual posters can be 
found that tout the effects of 
alcohol on female sexual 
satisfaction, skin conditions, 
professional success, weight 
gain, self-esteem and pregnancy. 



The powerful graphics, which 
were created to target women, 
are part of a research project by 
Michael Kalsher, associate 
professor of psychology at 
Rensselaer, who studies the 
effects 'of alcohol on male and 
fem^tollege students. 

The posters, which also hang 



in sorority houses and 
dormitories, also note, for 
example, that a daily glass of 
wine can boost your weight 10 
pounds a year, frequent heavy 
drinking can lead to bulimia, and 
that even moderate drinking can 
increase the nsk of breast cancer. 
"Our research has shown that 



posters with information that is 
optimally relevant to the needs 
and interests of specific target 
groups are more likely to attract 
attention and increase 
knowledge," said Kalsher. "By 
doing so, they can set the 
occasion for making wiser 
alcohol-related decisiohs " 

The research team found that 
women exposed to the posters 



scored significantly higher on 
alcohol education tests than 
control groups that did not see 
the posters. The women rated 
the posters as "very helpful" foi; 
making choices about whether to 
drink alcohol or not. 

; There has been an attempt tp, 
raise awareness of the dangers of 
alcohol on college campuses 
aCToss the nation. 



WCUC back on the air after four day shut-down 



hy Rodney L. Sherman 
News Editor 

Clarion University's FM radio 
station, WCUC, powered back 
up last Thursday, following a 
four day shut down. Paul Levy, 
program director at the student 
run station, said the station is 
back to stay. 

'I"he shut-down was u.sed to get 
together with the stall and set up 



a definite schedule of D.J.'s and 
show hosts. 

"I thought it would be better to 
correct the situation now, rather 
than later," said Levy, explaining 
that a major loss of personnel 
forced him to pull the plug after 
only four days of operation. 
"We had a total of about eight 
people who quit [after signing on 
as D.J.'s] or didn't come back, 
and that really put us in a bind," 



said Levy. 

Levy said his concern focused 
on maintaining a high degree of 
professionalism at the station. 
Levy said the station currently 
has 32 of 43 shifts filled by 
students with less than one year 
of radio experience. The station 
lost 17 D.J.'s to graduation and 
drop outs, resulting in a largely 
inexperienced staff. 

The budget crunch has hit all 



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540 Main Street 
Clarion, Pa 16214 

(814)226-8400 



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university organizations, and 
WCUC is no exception 
according to Levy. A reduction 
in funding has forced the station 
to seek underwriting from aiea 
businesses and organizations. 

Levy said the station's 
underwriters were first in mind 
when the decision to shut down 
was made. "I didn't want to lose 
underwriters," explained Levy, 
"If we were powering up and 
down at different times every 
day, we just don't look 
professional." 



ITie Federal Communications 
Commission (FCC) requires that 
stations follow a set schedule of 
broadcast hours. The loss of 
personnel was affecting those 
requirements also said Levy. 

"We're more of a public station 
than a college station," claimed 
Levy, "that made it even more 
frustrating to shut down, but 
we're up and running now, and 
we won't be down the rest of the 
year." 

"It will be a different .sounding 
station this yeiu"," vowed Levy. 



Clarion Video Center 



604 Main St. 
Clarion, PA 16214 

Monday-Thursday 10-8 Friday & Saturday 10-9 

Sunday 12-5 ,, 

Free Membership! 
Any Movies from Old to New! 



§ 



I 



Outside Clarion 



Congress approves military base closings 



courtesy of Associated Press 

National 

Congress closes military bases 

The United States Congress 
sealed the fate of dozens of 
military bases across the country 
Monday, approving 

recommendations to close 130 
facilities and scale back 45 
others in a money-saving effort 
that will cost tens of thousands 
of jobs. 

By a vote of 83-12, the Senate 
rejected a motion to disapprove 
the work of the Defense Base 
Closure and Realignment 
Commission. By law, the entire 
package lakes effect unless both 
the House and Senate overturn 
the panel's proposals in their 
entirely. 

The decision marked the third 
round of base closures in five 
years, and another try at 
reducing the military's 
infrastructure is planned for 
1995. 

The bulk of the direct job 
losses will be concentrated in 
three states. Florida, South 
Carolina and California will be 
the hardest hit. A total loss of 
74,700 jobs could be lost in 
those states. 

Senate Armed Forces 
Chairman Sam Nunn, D-Ga., 
expressed his sympathy for the 
affected communities, but argued 
that if the bases weren't closed, 
the military will have to reduce 
the size of its force. 

"One way or another, people 
are going to lose jobs," said 
Nunn. 

The senator warned that failure 
to shut down installations would 
return the military to the hallow 
armed services of the 1970's 
when the United States "kept the 
bases and eroded readiness of 
forces to fight." 

Trade Center trial 

Formal questioning began of 
potential jurors in the New York 
World Trade Center bombing 
Monday. The trial could start as 
early as today. 

During open questioning on 
Monday, the judge asked the first 
12 potential jurors about their 
religious preferences and 
whether they had ever 
experienced any racial problems. 
The judge again questioned the 
jurors Tuesday in a private 
session. 



Aspin trip costly 

Defense Secretary Les Aspin's 
five-day personal vacation trip to 
Venice during an official U^ip to 
Italy may have cost U.S. 
taxpayers over $30,000, 
according to Pentagon records 
released Monday. 

The expen.se vouchers showed 
costs of at least $29,575 for 
bodyguards, 22 crewmembers of 
Aspin's government jet, 
communications specialists and 
other staff while Aspin stayed at 
a five-star hotel. 

Pot crop flooded out 

The Midwest flooding that 
drowned so many acres of com, 
soybeans and wheat this summer 
also washed out another major 
cash crop: marijuana. 

Authorities say both cultivated 
plots and wild fields of the 
illegal weed got socked by the 
record rainfall and flooding. 

The amount of marijuana 
destroyed by law officers in 
Kansas this year is one-fifth as 
much as in 1992. 

Crops also are down 
throughout Missouri, based on 
searches by airplanes and other 
tips, said Lt. Jim Watson of the 
Missouri Highway Patrol. Police 
estimated that the size of the 
marijuana crop and arrests of pot 
harvesters in the county dropped 
by about half this year. 

West coast earthquake hits 
Oregon and California 

It turns out that Monday night's 
earthquake in southern Oregon 
and northern California was 
stronger than first thought. 

The U.S. Geological Survey 
revised the Richter scale reading 
on the quake up to 5.2 to 5.4. 
The experts also increased the 
strength of the first of two 
aftershocks up to 5.5 from 5.2. 

Demjanjuk's family goes to 
Israel 

John Demjanjuk's relatives 
new to Israel for what they hope 
is the last time, early Tuesday 
morning, to bring home the man 
acquitted of Nazi war crimes. 

Demjanjuk was free to leave 
Israel last Sunday after the 
Israeli Supreme Court lifted 
restrainting orders against his 
dept>rtation. 
Demjanjuk denies any crimes. 



State 

Shake-up at Erie insurance 

There has been a shake-up at 
the top of one of the state's 
largest insurance companies. 

The chairman and the 
executive vice president of Erie 
Insurance Group abruptly left 
their posts last week. Employees 
at the firm learned of the 
changes Monday at company 
headquarters. 

A company spokesman gave 
no reasons for the departures of 
Thomas Hagen and Maureen 
Dwyer. 

Besides being chairman, 
Hagen was also the chief 
executive officer of Erie 
Insurance. 

Hagen's wife was a member of 
the Hirt family, which founded 
the insurance company 68 years 
ago. 



Transplant patient remains 
critical 

An English girl who received a 
new set of abdominal organs last 
week in Pittsburgh's Children's 
Hospital, remains in critical 
condition. 

Doctors .said Laura Davies is 
now considered to be stable, and 
she is breathing on her own. The 
five-year-old girl received a new 
liver, stomach, pancreas, small 
intestine, large intestine and 
kidneys. 

Westinghouse to pay new 
executive one million dollars 

Michael Jordan, a former 
Pepsi executive, will o-y to lead 
Westinghouse out of a billion 
dollar debt. The Pittsburgh firm 
will pay Jordan one million 
dollars this year and offer 
anoUier million in bonuses. 



Patriot Party focuses on 
Pennsylvania's courts 

In an unusual move, the Patriot 
Party and its candidate for the 
state Supreme Court have 
adopted a platform calling for 
fundamental changes to 
Pennsylvania's judicial system. 

Robert Surrick, the West 
Chester lawyer running as a third 
party candidate, said Monday 
that imything short of a complete 
overhaul would mean "business 
as u.sual." 

Surrick said lawmakers have 
been avoiding true judicial 
reforms because the current 
system allows them to "control 
cases." 

Surrick, whose party grew out 
of Ross Perot's failed 
presidential bid last year, faces 
Democrat Russell Nigro and 
Republican Ronald Castille in 
the November election. 




courtesy of 

College Press Service 

Law school aids the indigent 



DAVIS, Calif. - A new 
program at the University of 
California - Davis law school 
provides legal representation for 
indigent people who cannot 
afford counsel in civil rights 
claims against the federal 
government. 

The plaintiffs, most of whom 
are prisoners unable to afford an 
attorney, will be referred to law 
students in the clinic by federal 
judges in the U.S. District Court 
for the Eastern District of 
California. 

Margaret Johns, a law school 
professor who developed the 
concept, said the clinic will 
provide students with litigation 
experience and provide clients 
with representation. 

The clinic will "relieve the 
court of the burden of people 
representing and trying cases 
themselves," Johns said. 

The UC Davis students will 
work on every aspect of 
litigating civil rights cases, and 
will be supervised by a 
practicing civil rights attorney. 



African spirituality course at 
Duquesne 

The spirituality practiced in 
Africa is the subject of a new 
course at Duquesne University 
taught by a Catholic priest who 
made his home in Kenya. 

The class is being taught by the 
Rev. Raymond Mosha, head of 
the Spirituality Department from 
the Catholic Higher Education 
Institute of Africa in Kenya. 

The goal of the newly formed 
class, according to the Rev. 
Clyde A. Bonar, director of the 
Institute of Formative 
SpirituaUty, is to teach about the 
world views that mold African 
spirituality. 



Women dancing with women a 
no-no? 

A counu-y and western dance 
class instructor created a 
brouhaha by telling a University 
of New Mexico student that the 
school had a policy that women 
can't dance with other women in 
the class. 

The class was offered for one 
credit. 

"I have no problem with ladies 
dancing with ladies," said 
instructor Jim Calvert, "but to 
avoid confusion, I'd rather have a 
leader stay a leader through the 
whole class. It gets really 
confusing switching back and 
forth." 



G. H. CARPET 

GRAND OPENING!! 

Dorm size remnants available in multiple colors. 

Cut to size 

Special student prices available! 
1239 E. Main St. (beside Fox's Pizza) 

226-4401 



Page Id 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



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BuHwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Murder, She Wrote g 



*** 



*V2 



Frame-Up II: The Cover-Up (1993) 



Play feisty for Me (1971) Clint Eastwood 



*** 



Honeymoon in Vecjas 



Partridge |Ge( Smart 



L.A. Law Wine Knot 



(1992) q 



Dragnet 



** Perfect 



*V; -Friday the 13th Part 3 (1982) R 



Fallen 



Bob Newhart 



Baseball 



Major Dad g 



Stereo) g 



Late Show q 



Love Con. 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



A High Wind m Jamaica 



Sportecenter 



Wings q lOdd Couple 



The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967) 



*»V2 



DiQQStown {W2. Comedy) James Woods. R' q 



M.T.Moore |M.T. Moore 



1985, Drama) John Travolta, Jann Wenner 



Van Dyke jLucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Red^KW 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteries^ 



FRIDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 24. 1993 



2 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



ilisi 



*'2 



Caddyshack II 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 



Empty Nest [Cheers g 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry 



Cops I 



Animaniacs 



Cur. Affair 



(3 00) Convicts Four 



5:00 



5:30 I 6l00" 



News g 



6/0 Girls Pont Cry. They Get Even 



Coach g 



Newsg 



News 



Geraldo 



Oprah Winfrey Q 



Tiny Toon [Batman q 



Newsq 



Newsq 



News 



News 



6:30 



1992) PG g 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



Full House q 



Newsq 



Roeanneq 



NBC News 



Tennis: Davis Cup - Bahamas vs United States 



-A High Wind in Jamaica ' {\%b) Antt^ony Quinn 



Ryder Cup Golf First Day [Parker Lewis [Facts of Life 



(230) 



Perry Mason Case of Fatal Framing 



Little Sister" (1992. Comedy) 'PG-13 



Muppets [Crazy Kids [Hey Dude (R) 



Motoworld 



Ninja Turtles 



Up Close 



Ninja Twttes 



7:00 



7:30 



Inside the NFL (R) q 



Hard Copy g 



Jeopardy! g 



Copsg 



CBS News 



Roseanne g 



Jeopardy! g 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



Am.Joumal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 I SW 



'9W 



•*V2 -White Sands (1992) Wiltem Dafoe. 



Family [Boy-WorW [Step by Step 



9:30 



10:00 [ lOiSO" 



11:00 



**''2 



Single 



Mr. Cooper 



White Female (1992) Bridget Fonda R' q 



Blossom in Pa//s (1993. Comedy) Mayim Biatik. g 



It Had to Be 



It Had to Be 



Album 



Album 



Brisco County, Jr. 



20/20 g 



Trade Winds (In Stereo) g 



-The Odd Couple {WZ, Comedy) Tony Randall, g 



-The Odd Couple (1993, Comedy) Tony Randall, g 



X-Files Squeeze ' q 



Blossom in Pans (1993. Comedy) Mayim Bialik. p 



Mama 



Trade Winds 



**'/; Fast Charlie - The Moonbeam Rider (1979) PG [**'/2 'For the Love of Mike" (1960) 



Sportscenter 



Major Dad g 



Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



Wings g 



•* -Take This Job and Shove It (1981) Rotjert Hays 



Murder, She Wrote g 



*•* -Georges Island (1989) PG' 



Guts 



B ridge Across Time (1985) David Hasselhoff. 



What You Do 



Supermarfcet 



Loortey 



Shop-Drop 



Yavapai Story 



*•* "Passed/waK (1992) Bob Hosklns. PG-13 q 



Looney 



TBuHwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Partridge [Get Smart 



LA. Law 



Mama 



In Stereo) q 



Short Sub. 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



11:30 



Sanders 



Cheers g 



12:00 



Comedy Jam 



NighHine q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



LateShow (In Stereo) g 



Edition 



Chevy Chase (In Stereo) q [Love Con, 



Late Stww q 



News q [Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



**^'2 -The Valachi Papers (W2) PG' 



*** 



-Bronco 6///K (1980. Comedy) Clint Eastwood. Sondra Locke 



Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



■'Wild Orchid (^%^. Drama) Mickey Rourke NR' 



**"2 -The Lawnmower Man (1992) Jeff Fahey. R q 



Dragnet 



iBob Newhart |M.T. Moore IM.T. Moore 



*• 



/ Saw What You Did' (1988) Robert Carradine 



Happy Hour mB7) 



*♦ "Wild Orchid 2: Two Shades of Blue' 



*« 



The Resurrected 099^ 



Van Dyke [Lucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



John Terry 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteries 



SATURDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 25, 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



(3 45) Beethuice (1988) 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



"Brain Donors' (1992) John Turturro. 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



**'/; ■Bebes Kids 0992) 'PG-13' g 



College Football: Regional Coverage 



(12 00) Ryder Cup Golf: Second Day. 



(3 00) Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced 



(3 00) Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced 



(3:00) Baywatch ! 



American Gladiators 



(12:00) Ryder Cup Golf: Second Day 



News 



News 



News g 



NBC News 



CBS News 



CBS News 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



Newsq 



(3 00) 



♦ ♦'2 



The Valachi Papers (1972) Charles Bronson PG' 



NBC News 



News g 



Empty Nest 



Siskel 



Wh. Fortune 



Untouchables (In Stereo) g 



Crusaders 



Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



Jeopardy! g [Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 [ 9:30 



• ♦'2 



"Innocent Stood (1992. Horror) Anne Parillaud. R' 



**' 



Cocktail (1988. Drama) Tom Cruise (In Stereo) q 



Mommies g I Cafe An>e7 



Medicine Woman 



Medicine Woman 



Cops i 



Mommies 



ii. 



Cops (R) g 



*** 



Auto Racing: NASCAR ■- Goody s 150 [Tennis: Davis Cup - Bahanaas vs US 



The Story on Page One" (1960. Drama) Rita Hayworth 



Cafe Ame. 



Empty Nest [Nurses g 



Harts of the West ' Pilot q 



Hartsof the West Pilot 



Front Page (Iri Stereo) g 



.ill 



Empty Nest [Nurses g 



10:00 



Dream On g 



10:30 



Crypt Tales 



Commish g 



Sisters Back on Track " g 



Walker, Texas Ranger q 



Walker, Texas Ranger 



Comic Strip Live (In Stereo) 



Sisters Back on Track g 



Murder by Death (1976. Comedy) Peter Falk, PG 



"Rubdown .(1993. Drama) Jack Coleman. (In Stereo) g 



(2 30) 



*'2 



(3 25) Cheech-Brother 



Captain America (1990) PG-13 g 



Can't on TV [Arcade 



•♦* "Hook I 



Double Dare 



1991. Fantasy 



Wild Side 



"Mac and Mp (1988. Fantasy) Jade Category 



Major Dad q [Wings :; 



Football [College Foott>all: Rutgers at Penn State. (Live) 



Case Closed g 



Solar Crisis' (1990) Tim Matheson PG-13 g 



Robin Williams. (In Stereo) PG g 



Salute [Legends [Doug 



**\2 



Every Which Way but Loose (1978. Comedy) Clint Eastwood 



Football 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



•** -My Cousin Vinny" (1992) Joe Pesci. 



Newsg 



News 



News 



News g 



Golden Girts [Empty Nest 



Saturday Night Live 



Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



Untouchables (In Stereo) q 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q [Music 



News g [Saturday Night Live 



The Adventures of Baron Munchausen 



Baseball 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) g 



«** 



Light SleeperC\%2. Drama) Willem Dafoe R 



♦ *'2 



Suburban Commando (1991) PG g 



Rugrats 



** 



"From the Dead ol flight" (1989) Lindsay Wagner 



Clarissa 



Roundhouse 



Poison Ivy (1992. Suspense) R 



»«*^2 "Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991) Arnold Schwarzenegger. 



Sportscenter |Ch. Flag 



'Beach Beverly Hills ' 



•'2 Death Ring {^2} R 



Red Shoe 



Ren-Stimpy [You Afraid? 



** 



From the Dead of Night (1989) Lindsay Wagner 



Very Very Nick at Nite 



Hidden 



Hidden 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Fallen 



Superman 



China Beach 



SUNDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 26, 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



Life Stories 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



**'2 



"The Outsiders' (1983) l^att Ditlon. 



Senior PGA Golf: Nationwide Championship 



ALF 



•i 



jCosby Show [Cosby Show 



iMotorWeek 

^Orleai^S'SaMi 



6:00 



Mr. Bean q 



Newsq 



NFL Football: San Francisco 49ers at New-.OrleaiM'SaMts 
NFL Football: San Francisco 49ers at New Orleans Saints 



Night Court 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



♦* 



'Vnfy ypu "(1992) Andrew f^cCarthy. 



ABC News 



NBC News 



Steelers 



Funny About Love 1)990, Comedy) Gene Wilder 



The NFL 



(3:00) Story on Page 



Auto Racing [NASCAR 



HS Sports (Rescue 911 



(Live) q 
(Live) q 



Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



News [NBC News 



*** 



Murder by Death' {\97S. Comedy) Peter Falk. PG' 



(3 00) **' ; "Every Which Way but /.oose [Two Dads 



Auto Racing: FIA Formula One - Portuguese Grand Prix. 



(3.15) 



*** 



(3 35) **'/? '/(itss/n Coi/s/ns (1964) 



School 7>es (1992, Drama) PG-13' 



Can't on TV [Arcade 



Double Dare 



Ready or Not 



Freshmen 



**''2 



•Right to Die (1987, Drama) Raguel Welch. 



Major Dad q [Wings g 



Videos 



Am. Funniest 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 
60 Mimifes ( In 'Stereo) g 



60 Minutes (Ifi Stereo),q 
Townsend Television g 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



♦ ** 



White Men Cant Jump' (1992) Woody Harrelson 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



*** 



Lo4s & Clari(-Supern)^n 



Seaouest DSV (In Stereo) 



ague 
irder, 



Murder. She Wrtte d 



Mur der. She Wrote g 
. , ' i " I' j. J ' ■^. 



Martin [Living Single 



Seaquest DSV (In Stereo) 



**V2 'Any Which Way You Csn (1980) Oint Eastwood. 



NFL Primetime 



Baseball Tonight 



** 'City Heaf' (1984. Comedy) Clint Eastwood. PG g 



'The Substitute' {i993, Suspense) Amanda Donohoe^ 



Whose Child Is This'' The War for Baby Jessica (1993) 



"And the Band Played On (1993) Matthew Modine 



"Final /4ppga/' (1993. Suspense) Brian Dennehy, g 



**'/2 



**'2 



Married.. 



■"Sleepmq With the Eneiny '{^991] jluto- Rol^erts g 
"Sleeping With the Cnem/ (1991) Julia Roberts g 



'ng 
1 



Dearest 



[Star Trek: Next Gener. 



Final Appeal (1993, Suspense) Bnan Dennehy. q 



**♦ 



l4/;j;otv (1988, Fantasy) Val Kilmer. PG' (Violence) 



Golf: Winston Cup Pro-Am. 



Case Closed (R) q 



♦ *V2 



Return of the Dragon 



Chris Cross 



Rocko's Life 



***' 



'; "Dead Poets Society (19B9, Drama) Robin Williams. PG q 



Leynds [You Afraid? |Rour>dhouse Nick News iMorfc 



S/>ame" (1992, Dramay Amanda Donohoe, Fairuza Balk. |***V2 -Prizzis Honor (1985, Comedy) Jack Nicholson 



Golf: Monarch s Challenge 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) g 



(1973) R' I*** "The Chinese Connection (1973) R 



** •(/mVersa/.i9(?fcfter (1992) Jean-Claude Van Damme. 



Lucy Show [Van Dyke |M.T. Moore 



Bob Newhart 



Jokers 



News g 



News 



Nev^s 



Newsq 



Paid Prog. 



News 



Short Sub. 



Cheers g 



Night Court 



Siskel 



Murphy B. 



Paid Prog. 



Rescue 911 



12:00 



"Killer Inst.' 



Dear John Q 



Cheers q 



Murphy B. 



lifestyles 



TBA 



Suspect 



Gt/nsa/eafas/ (1964) 



Sportscenter 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) g 



NFL 
Holtywifed 



** 



Game of Death i\979) Bruce Lee. 



Fallen 



Dragnet 



** 



'Cama/Cnmes (1991) 



A. Hitchcock 



Speciality Update 



Superman 



Phjlgrfcian^ 



MONDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 27. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



Paha Sapa 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



** Hot Stuff {:979) Pom DeLuise. PG 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 



Empty Nest [Cheers g 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry 



Cops Pilot 



Tiny Toon 



Cur. Affair 



(3:30) Cleopatra Jones 



Max Out (R) 



Pyramid 



(2:30) 



Dream Lg. 



Pyramki 



Newsq 



Coach q 



Newsq 



News 



Geraldo 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Animaniacs 



Batman g 



Newsq 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



** -The Sluggers iV/fe (1985) Michael O'Keete. g 



Newsq 



News 



News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



Full House g 



Newsq 



Roseanne g 



NBC News 



*** Guns at Batasi (1964) Richard Attenborouqh. 



Yearbook 



Parker Lewis 



Max Out 



Facts of Life 



(3:00) ■ He s My Girl {m7) 



The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967) 



Muppets [Crazy Kids 



Th'breds 



Ninja Turtles 



UpCtose 



Nii^ Turtles 



Hard Copy q 



Jeopardy! q 



Cops " Pilot' 



CBS News 



Roseanne q 



'teoP'K'y'Q 



Ent Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



News/Kids 



You Bet-Life 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



** "To Protect and Serve 



Monday Night 



Fresh Prince 



Shade 



Shade 



Sports 



Blossom g 



Dave's 



Dave's 



"Soo" 



1992) R' 



9:30 I lOlOO" 



10:30 



** :OocforMord/-)d (1992, Fantasy) R 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



**V2 Single White Fema/e (1992) R' q 



NFL Football: Pittsburgh Steelers at Atlanta Falcons. Froni the Georgia Dome, g [News q 



Shattered Trust: TheShari Karney Stor71T993, Drama) 



Murphy B. 



Murphy B. 



Love & War 



Love & War 



»*V2 Communion (1989) Christopher Walken g 



Fresh Prince [Blossom g 



** Bloodhounds of Broadway 09S9) Madoma. PG 



Sportscenter 



Major Dad q 



NFL Prinw Monday 



Wings g 



** 



•*'/; 'Cabin in the S/ck' (1943, Musical) 



Loverboy" {^9^) Patrick Dempsey. 'PG-13' g 



Murder. She Wrote q 



Northern Enposure q 



Northern Exposure q 



Mama 



Mama 



Shattered Trust: The Shan Karney Story 0993 . Drama) 



*''? The Boss ^V)/e (1986) Daniel Stern. [Short Sub 



Pro Beach Volleyball 



Hey Dude (R) [Guts 



*** 



Alice Doesnt Live Here Anymore (1975, Drama) 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



"Were Talkin Serious Money (1993) 



WWF: Monday Niflljt Raw 



** 'Seacftes '(1988, Drama) Bette Midler. (In Stereo) PG-13 q 



Looney 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



BuHwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Partridge [Get Smart 



L.A. Law 



yNjfl! 



Surfing: Gunston 500 (R) 



Silk Stalkings Lady Luck 



Ulterior Motives 0992 



** 



■Prey of (he Chameleon (1992) R 



Dragnet 



[Bob Newhart M.T. Moore 



Drama) 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Chevy Chase 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Late Show (In Stereo) q 



Edition 



In Stereo) g 



Late Show q 



Love Con. 



News g [Tonight Showfln Stereo) q 



** Author! Authorl 0982) Al Pacino. 



Baseball 



Major Dad g 



Sportscenter 



Wings g [Odd Cotw>te 



Sex, Shock 4 Censorship 



*** "South Central 0992, Drama) 'R' q 



M.T. Moore 



*** Small Sacrifices (1989. Drama) Farrah Fawcett. 



Van Dyke 



The Human Shield " 0992) 



Lucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteries 



TUESDAY EVENING 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(230) 



SEPTEMBER 28. 1993 
7130 I 5l60 F 



5:30 



Donahue (In Stereo) g 



"Only You 0992) Andrew McCarthy 



Empty Nest [Cheers g 



Oprah Winfrey i 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry Tiny Toon 



Cops Pilot 



Cur. Affair 



(3 00) *** Tim (1979) 



Max Out (R) 



Pyramid 



(2 30) 



Dream Lg. 



Pyramid 



News I 



Newsq 



Coach g [News 



Newsq 



Geraldo 



Oprah Wmtrey g 

Animaniacs |Batman"g" 



News g 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



**V; "Ladyhawke 098S) Matthew Broderick. PG-13 q 



ABC News 



News 



News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



News 



Full House q Roseanne g 



Newsg 



NBC News 



Bloodhounds of Broadway (1969) Madonna PG 



Yeart>ook Max Out NBA Today Up Close 



Partcer Lewis Facts of Life 



(3 30) ♦'? Baby on Board 



i Story of Boys and Girls ( 1 99 1 ) 



Muppets [Crazy Kids 



Ninja Turtles [Ninja Turtles [Major Dad g [Wings g 



Hard Copy g Ent Tonight 

.lAAnarHul M Wh PnrtiinA 



Jeopardy! g 



Cops "Pilot' 



CBS News 



Roseanne g 



Jeopardy! g 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 [ 8:30 [ 9:00 [ 9^30 

»*'2 "Innocent Blood 0992. Horror) Anne Parillaud 
Full House g Phenom g Roseanne q Coach q 
Saved-Bell [Getting Byq Larroquette [SecotidH 



Larroquette [Second Half [Dateline (In Stereo) q 



10:00 



10:30 



By Satan Possessed: Devil 



NYPD Blue 4B or Not 4B 



News q 



Am.Joumal 



Married... [Rescue 911 (In Stereo) q [ "Precious Victims' (1993. Drama) Park Overall, q 

Major League Baseball: Pittsburgh Pirates at Philadelphia Phillies. (Live) Am.Jou 

Married... Roc g Bakersfield America's Most Wanted g Mama [Mama 

Wh. Fortutw [Saved-Bell IGetting By q Larroquette [Second Half [Dateline (In Stereo) q 



**V2 ffo/jires (1980 .Adventure) Roger Moore. PG 



Sportscenter Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced (Live) 



"Farf-Safe (1964. Suspense) Henry Fonda 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



*'2 "The Sope/- (1991) Joe Pesci. R q 



News 



Cheers q [Nightline g 



News 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In Stereo) q 



News g [Edition Late Shov 

Chevy Chase (In Stereo) q ILove Con. 
News q [Tonight Show (In Stereo! 



News q [Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



♦ *"2 



"The Outsiders 09B3) Matt Dilton. 



Cheech & Chongs CorsKan Brothers 



»»'2 Any Which Way You Can (1980) Clint Eastwood 



Hey Dude (R)|Guts 



♦ ♦ 7 



Bitter Harvest (1981 Drama) Ron Howard. 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



»* The Light m the Jungle (1991) PG 



Looney 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



BuHwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Murder, She Wrote q 



[Boxing: Larry Holmes vs Jose Ribalta (Live) 



[Major League Baseball Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



2 The Swordsman (1992) Lorenzo Lamas. R q j** 7//iyS(ons (1991) Heather Locklear 



♦ ♦'-2 



"Dtggstown (1992) James Woods 



Partridge [Get Smart 



L.A. Law Helter Shelter 



Dragnet 



Fallen Angels (In Stereo) : 



Bob Newhart M.T. Moore 



Major Dad q Wings q [Odd Couple 



Project Shadowchaser 



*'2 Street Crimes (1992) Denms Farina. 



M.T. Moore 



*** Small Sacrifices (1989. Drama) Farrah Fawcett 



Van Dyke [Lucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Lady Bwre 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteries 



WEDNESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 29. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



(315) Buddy Holly 



Donahue (In Stereo) : 



Empty Nest [Cheers : 



Oprah Winfrey : 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry 



Co£L 



Tiny Toon 



Cur. Affair 



5:00 



t 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 [ fiOO" 



7:30 



The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957 Drama) William Hokten. PG 



News; 



Coach g 



News g 



News 



Geraldo 



Oprah Winfre 



Animaniacs [Batman g 



News: 



V '"^ 



Max Out (R) 



Fail-Safe (1964 Suspense) Henry Fonda 



Pyramid 



(3 00) 



Dream Lg. 



Pyramid 



NFL Yrt)k. 



Partier Lewis 



Max Out 



Facts of Life 



News: 



News 



News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



News: 



Full House : 



Newsg 



Short Sub. 



Inside PGA 



Ninja Turtles 



♦ '2 



(3 35) 



Poltergeist III (1988 Horror) Tom Skerntt PG-13 



Little Murders (1971) PG 



Muppets [Crazy Kids JHey Dude (R) 



Roseanne : 



NBC News 



Hard Copy : 



Jeopardy! i 



Copsg 



CBS News 



Roseanne ; 



Jeopardy! g 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



Am.Joumal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



*** 



Thea: 



The Witches of Eastwick (1987) Jack Nicholson 



Joe's Life : 



Unsolved Mysteries : 



Home Imp [Grace Under 



Now-T. Brokaw 8i K. Couric 



10:00 



Sanders 



10:30 



Dream On : 



Moon Over Miami : 



Law & Order Discord 



Country Music Association Awards (In Stereo Live) q 



Country Music Association Awards (In Stereo Live) q 



Beverly Hills, 90210 g 



Unsolved Mysteries \ 



*♦' 



Up Close 



The Valachi Papers (1972 Drama) Charles Bronson PG 



Ninja Turtles [ Major Dad g [Wings 



Melrose Place (In Stereo) r; 



Now-T. Brokaw & K. Counc 



Diner (1982. Comedy 



Mama 



Mama 



Law it Order Discord g 



Steve Guttenberg R 



Sportscenter Major League Baseball Teams to Be Announced (Live) 



Baseball 



*'2 Rabbit Test (1978) Billy Crystal 



The Toy (1982 Comedy) Richard Pryor PG 



Guts 



Rcxanne The Prize Pulitzer (1989 Drama) 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



Looney 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



Stories 



Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Murder, She Wrote q 



♦ *'2 



Young Guns (1988 Western) Emilio Estevez R 



2 A Taste lor Killing 0992) Jason Bateman 



** Shattered (1991) Tom Berenger R 



Partridge [Get Smart 



L.A. Law 



Dragnet 



Boxing 



Bob Newhart 



11:00 



Crypt Tales 



News ; 



News 



News 



News : 



11:30 



12:00 



♦ ♦'2 



Cheers i 



Point Break 09%)) 



[Nightline g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In Stereo) q 



Edition 



Chevy Chase (In Stereo) g 



Late Show q 



Love Con. 



News : 



[Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



*»'2 Sylvester 098b Drama) PG 



Sportscenter 



Major Dad : 



Ayosfaqe (1992) Sam Neill R 



Brett Butler 



M T. Moore 



Wings; 



Surfer 



Odd Couple 



** 



** Scanners III The Takeover (1992) 



r/meflonne/- (1992) 



M.T. Moore 



Punchline (1988. Comedy-Drama) Sally Field 



Van Dyke [Lucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Unborn 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteries 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Page 11 




Students have chance to study abroad in Malta 



by Suzanne Hildebrandt 
Features Writer 

Come be all you can be! See 
exotic places and encounter 
exciting cultures! No, this is not 
the military, but university life. 

Clarion University does not 
stop at the city limits. It extends 
far beyond that to lands overseas 
such as Europe and Africa as 
well as many others. Other than 
the university's International 
Programs, there are ample 
opportunities to study abroad, 
including the tropical paradise of 
Malta. 

This Spring, 20 Clarion students 
will be venturing off to the 
University of Malta for a 
semester they will never forget, 
and you could be one of them. 
The university is located near the 
capital of the island of Malta, 
which is a Mediterranean Island 
19 miles long and nine miles 
wide. The island itself is located 
within the Mediterranean Sea for 
easy access to Italy, Greece, 
Spain and other European 



countries. Some average flying 
times to different destinations 
are: London-three hours, Rome- 
one hour, and Frankfurt-two 
hours. There are other forms of 
transportation also that won't 
take too long. 

Imagine spending your 
weekends in a different country 
each day or even just new and 
different towns. English is the 
main language of Malta (along 
with Maltese), so getting where 
you want is no problem. Having 
one of the lowest cost of living 
standards in Euroi>e helps our 
starving students, too. 

Speaking of expenses, studying 
in exotic Malta will cost you the 
same as staying here in Clarion. 
The only added expenses will be 
airfare and passport fees. Of 
course you'll want that extra 
cash for munchies or a quick trip 
to Rome (instead of the usual 
venture to Pittsburgh or Erie). 
The amount you spend on trying 
to keep yourself from total 
boredom here could get you 
more fun on the relaxed. 




University Relations photo 
Malta Is a beautiful sunny island off the coast of Sicily 
where some students may have the opportunity to spend a 
semester studying at the University of Malta. 



hospitable island. 

Not only are there 
opportunities for recreation, but 
the University of Malta also 
has an excellent academic 
reputation. They are involved in 
innovative aquaculture research 



projects, techniques of lateral 
thinking and the Department of 
Biochemistry has an inter- 
national reputation in molecular 
biology and geriatrics. This is 
in collaboration with the 
International Institute of the 



Aging set up by the United' 
Nations in Malla. 

For the historians and social 
scientists among us, Malui i.s one 
huge museum or laboratory not 
bound by the university walls. 
All students will return with a 
greater degree of cross-cultural 
understanding and a fulfillment 
in themselves they could never 
experience any other way. 

If all of this sounds good to 
you, then go to the Office of 
International Programs in 212 
Founders Hall to pick up an 
application. On September 27, 
there will be an open-campus 
meeting in Pierce Auditorium 
where a video on Malta will be 
shown and financial aid 
information will be available. 

This is a chance of a lifetime to 
study abroad this coming spring 
semester. Right now there is still 
space available, but that space, 
like classes, goes quickly. If you 
are going, there is a $200 non- 
refundable deposit due by 
October 12. 



International students get firsthand view of Clarion lifestyle 



by Crystal J anis 
Features Writer 



Every fall semester. Clarion 
University is inundated with new 
faces. These students are either 
freshmen or transfer students 
from all over the country. 
Among this wave of fresh faces 
there are always some 
international students, but due to 
their proportionately small 
number, they may seem a little 
bit harder to meet. That is why 
the Office of International 
Programs would like to take this 
opportunity to introduce some of 
these students. 

Luis Almeida works at the 
Office of International Programs. 
He is a junior finance major 
from Brazil and is the Student 
Coordinator of the Community 
Outreach Program. This 
program is a two-way 
involvement between 

international students and the 
community. 

International students have the 
opportunity to go to local 
schools, church groups and other 
different community 

organizations and share a little 



bit about their culture. They 
might give a speech about their 
nation or put on a performance 
(possibly a fashion show or share 
the writing techniques of their 
language.) Almeida will 
introduce some of these students. 

One of the first international 
students Almeida had the 
pleasure of meeting was Dirk 
Broeder. Broeder is from 
Wolfenbuettel, a city of 50,000 
people about 70 k.m. from 
Hanover, Germany. Broeder 
explained to Almeida that 
Germany is split up into 15 
countries, and that his hometown 
is located in Niedersachsen 
County. 

Broeder is on an exchange 
program and will be at Clarion 
until the end of this semester. 
The reason he came to the 
United States was to perfect his 
English. In Almeida's opinion, 
Broeder is a die hard 
perfectionist because his English 
sounds close to perfect. Broeder 
likes the people he has met, but 
says he will miss his girlfriend. 
Sorry ladies. 

Broeder is one of the few 
international students who come 



to Clarion knowing that they will 
see a familiar face when they 
arrive. This is because he came 
over with another German 
national, Oliver Hahn. Hahn is 
from Kassel, which is about a 
two-hour car ride north of 
Frankfort. Kassel is a university 
town of about 16,000 people. 
Hahn and Broeder met each 
other at the university where 
they both acquired an 
undergraduate business degree. 

Hahn feels that Americans are 
very friendly and are not nearly 
as "stiff as his own countrymen. 
To Hahn, Clarion's rural setting 
is beautiful. The only thing 
Hahn is having a hard limes 
adjusting to culturally are the 
low alcohol content and 
something called "last call." 

After being involved for three 
years in the international 
program, Almeida has become 
very accustomed to exotic 
sounding names. When he saw a 
Smith Usted in the International 
Program's Directory he was very 
curious. It turns out that Dcnyse 
Smith is a speech pathology 
major from Canada. Smitli has a 
degree from Toronto University, 



but decided to come to the 
United States becau.se of some 
advantages in the American 
system. 

Smith feels that university 
admissions in Canada are too 
competitive, and that at Clarion 
she gets a much less restrictive 
approach to her coursework. 
She was extremely happy that all 
of her professors knew her name 
after one day of class. Smith 
likes the small class size and is 
extremely glad to be here. 

One day sitting in the 
International Office, Almeida got 
to meet two African students 
talking excitedly in English. 
Pius Boachie is from Accra, the 
capital of Ghana, and Bryant 
Messiah is from South Africa. 
Both are first-year undergraduate 
students. 

Boachie wants a real estate 
degree, and Messiah is hoping to 
become an accountant. Both 
attended universities in their 
countries two years prior to 
coming to Clarion. They 
mentioned feelings of isolation 
due to Clarion's size and lack of 
transportation. Almeida told 
them that this was natural, and 



that eventually one will become 
quite happy to just stay here and 
relax. Clarion-style. 

Balbindaur Kaur is a very nice 
young lady from a small island 
state located off the soudiem tip 
of Malaysia, called Singapore. 
Having lived for six years in 
Singapwe, Almeida was excited 
to talk to somecHie with whom he 
had mutual experiences. 

Kaur came directly to Clarion, 
and was surprised that some 
parts of the United States are not 
quite like what Hollywood 
would want us to believe. She 
told Almeida that she will miss 
her family, friends and fotxl, but 
is looking forward to new 
experiences in store for her. 

Almeida added his own 
comments on Clarion, "I enjoy 
Clarion thoroughly and cannot 
think of any place I would rather 
be. Wait a minute, 1 guess I can 
think of a few, but those places 
do not offer a finance degree." 

For more information on the 
International Program, contact 
Dr. Helen I cpke in room 212 
Founders. 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Pagel3 



Koinonia Christian Fellowship united students 'at the pole' 



by Dehra J. Weinheimer 
Contributing Writer 

On Wednesday September 15 
at 7 a.m., approximately 50 
students met at the flagpole next 
to Founders Hall to pray for the 
students, faculty, and adminis- 
tration of Clarion University. 

The students were participating 
in a world-wide day of student 
prayer called "See You at the 
Pole." This event began in 1989 
as a vision of a few students in 
Texas to pray for their friends, 
school and country. Their vision 
has become a powerful 
movement of prayer that has 
united high school and college 
students from almost every city. 



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denomination and ethnic group. 
Last year it is estimated that 
more than one million students 
participated in "See You at the 
Pole." 

Here at Clarion, the students 
represented two Christian 
Fellowship groups on ciunpus- 
Intervarsity Christian Fellowship 
and Koinonia Christian 
Fellowship. The groups meet 
regularly for fellowship, prayer, 
small group Bible studies, 
retreats and conferences. 

Koinonia meets on Monday 
nights at 7:30 p.m. in room 252 
Gemmell Student Center for 
"Monday Night Live." 
Intervarsity's large group 
meeting is on Tuesday nights at 
7:30 fHii in the RACS lounge in 
Gemmell. Both groups invite 
you to check their organization 
out. 



' ] 

1 




Debra J. Weinheimer/Clarion Call 
Koinonia's "See you at the pole" last Wednesday to pray. 



Fifty students participated in 

Phi Sigma Sigma sorority receives national awards 



by Anji Brown 
Features Writer 



"Aim high," states Phi Sigma 
Sigma president Tanya Schmidt. 
Phi Sigma Sigma is by no means 
an ordinary sorority; they go 
above and beyond the call of 
duty. 

Clarion University's Gamma 
Gamma chapter of Phi Sigma 
Sigma made an outstanding 
achievement at the Leadership 
Training School, King of 
Prussia, where they received five 
awards out of the forty-five 
given. About 105 Phi Sigma 
Sigma chapters attended this 
event, and yet none of them 
bested Clarion University's own 
Phi Sigma Sigmas. 

The five awards received were 
the Individual Scholarship given 
to Jen Homer, Undergraduate of 



the Year given to Leslie 
Cathcart, the National Ritual 
Award, the 100% Initiation 
Award and having the Best 
Understanding of Sorority 
Pledges Award given to the 
chapter. Schmidt states, "We 
proved ourselves by coming 
back with (these) five national 
awards. 

Phi Sigma Sigma's services 
range from helping the elderly 
set up for bingo to raising money 
for the National Kidney 
Foundation. This sorority is also 
active in helping the Junior 
Olympics, and have been known 
to put in 326 service hours in one 
semester. 

This year, to raise money for 
the National Kidney Foundation, 
Phi Sigma Sigma is putting 
together a Rock-a-thon with the 



Kappa Delta Rho fraternity. Phi 
Sigma Sigma has many other 
charities planned for this year. 

Phi Sigma Sigma has been 
very successful since they came 
to Clarion in 1971. Their pledge 
program lasts eight weeks, but 
while pledging, they consider the 
pledge to be a sister instead of 
just an associate member. 

Tanya Schmidt joined the 
organizaUon in the spring of 
1991. She says she instantly felt 
at home with her sisters and did 



not feel the jM-essure to conform ^, 
to any image. Schmidt states, 
"The sisters accepted me for who ' 

I was."-.. „,.._„„^-..,.„„.^ 

Study hours are highly su^ssed 
in Phi Sigma Sigma. Because of 
this, they were number one (Or 
receiving scholarships, fivery 
year, Phi Sigma Sigma must 
have a quota of 60 women to 
join, and they have never fallen 
under that quota. 



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Annual Hills Lock Up 

Child victims of Cystic Fibrosis will throw themselves 

behind bars and raise bail to free themselves from the 

confines of this #1 genetic disease. 

"Jail site" in center court of North HilLs Village Mall, Pittsburgh 
Sunday, September 26, noon-3 p.m. 

Scheduled to appear: Cap'n Crunch, Cbuck E. Cheese, 
McDonald's Grimace, Boot's 'n Garters country dancers and 

much more! 

For more information, call the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation at 
(412)321-4422 



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by Chuck Shepherd 



-A suspect said to be in his 20s 
escaped after robbing a First 
American Bank branch in 
Nashville, Tennessee in August, 
but not before leaving some of 
the money behind during the 
getaway. The teller had 
managed to give the man a bag 
of "bait" money containing an 
explodable device that would 
coat the money with a dye soon 
after he left the bank. 
Apparently, the man wanted to 
free his hands during the 
getaway and so he stuffed the 
bag into his sweatpants. Said a 
Nashville detective, "We believe 
he may have (dropped the money 
when he) suffered severe bums 
to his groin area. 

-In April, police in Chandler, 
Arizona arrested Arturo Ortiz, 
33, who weighed 135 pounds, 
after he had allegedly broken 
into a h(»ne an^ begun fondling 



a woman as she slept. The 
woman weighed 260 pounds and 
easily subdued Ortiz by twisting 
his wrist behind his back and 
holding him until police arrived. 
Said the woman, "I'm large, and 
he happens to be small." 

-The New York Times reported 
in April that Kansas lawyers 
Michael Harris and Fletcher Bell 
were successful in filing worker 
compensation claims for back 
injuries suffered at work: Harris 
got almost $35,000 for the stfain 
of reaching into the backseat of 
his car, and Bell got $95,000 for 
his injury lifting his briefcase 
from the trunk of his car. 

-During a nationally televised 
August pre-season game, Denver 
Bronco defensive tackle Darren 
Drozdov, who was in his stance 
opposite the offensive center 
awaiting the snap, vomited on 
the ball. Afterward, he told 
reporters, "I get sick a lot. I was 
a quarterback in high school, and 



I'd start throwing up on my 
center's back. I don't have a lot 
ofconu-ol out there." 

-In April Associated Press 
profile of North Carolina State 
University veterinarian Greg 
Lewbart reported that he is one 
of the few in the country who 
U^eat pet fish. Dr. Lewbart's fees 
range from $100 for a checkup, 
including X-rays, to $250 for 
surgery. He said business is 
good because it is so difficult to 
keep tropical fish alive in a home 
fish tank. 

-In April in the Republic of the 
Congo, Bemadette Obelebouli, 
34, gave birth to triplets, but at 
the rate of one per day for three 
days during a 60-mile journey on 
foot. She assumed she was 
through birthing after she 
delivered the first one, but they 
kept coming. And in Vancouver, 
British Columbia, Joanne March, 
29, gave birth prematurely to the 
first of her triplets on April 30, 



but doctors decided to leave the 
other two until they were 
healthier, and they were bom on 
June 14. 

-In April, The Sun newspaper 
in London reported that 
machinist Craig Fames, who had 
recently experienced constant, 
painful earaches, was completely 
cured when doctors removed a 
pregnant spider that had been 
nesting in the ear. Fames 
reportedly now wears earplugs 
when he sleeps, to prevent 
another incident, and has grown 
fond of the spider, which he 
retained as a pet. 

-The Los Angeles Times 
reported in May that Billy Davis 
has upset his neighbors with 
excessive security precautions 
for his modest home in a middle- 
class neighborhood in Los 
Angeles County. To protect him 
and his wife, Fym, Davis has 
outfitted the unpretentious house 
with barred windows, video 
monitors, infrared alarms, razor 
wire, 26 outdoor 500-watt hghts 
that flood into neighbors' homes 
at night, various "hair-trigger" 
alarm bells and sirens, and a 
Doberman. Local police say the 
Davises stay up all night because 
of fear of intruders and call 



police for help as much as 60 
times a month. 

-A Cincinnati woman charged 
recently that a 42-year-old man 
sexually assaulted her after 
taking advantage of a medical 
condition which usually causes 
her to faint when she hears the 
word "sex." Allegedly, the man 
accosted her in her apartment 
building, uttered tlie magic word, 
and tlien assaulted her after she 
fell to the floor. In a court 
appearance in July, the woman 
fainted twice when prosecutors 
used the word "sex" in 
descriptions of her condition. 

-Lars Christiansen, 19, and 
Michael Peters, 25, charged in a 
German court in May with 
killing three men last year in a 
right-wing political firebombing, 
admitted they had joined the 
neo-Nazi movement in Germany. 
Peters had even left a "Hail, 
Hitler" phone message to the 
police after the firebombing. 
However, both men said they 
didn't hate anyone and had 
joined the movement only 
because of the friendship and 
"free beer." 

-(c)1993 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



Clarion artist displays works 



by Sherry Dickerson 
Features Writer 



"I always wanted to be an artist 
so I decided to give it a try," says 
Jeanne Cousins Hufnagel, a 
Clarion resident. 

Hufnagel received her B.F.A. 
in art from Clarion University in 
May of 1992. She had already 
earned a college degree in home 
economics from Immaculate 
College. Therefore, becoming 
an artist was a dream come true 
for Hufnagel. 

Jeanne Hufnagel has had single 
works displayed on occasion and 
did a student exhibit at Clarion 
University, but this is her first 
solo exhibition. Hufnagel's 
exhibit is on display at the 
Women's Studies Center in 
Harvey Hall. The admission is 
free and open to the general 
public. 



The exhibition can be seen on 
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 
from 11 a.m. -4 p.m. and on 
Thursdays from 9 a.m,-4 p.m. 
Hufnagel's works will be 
displayed until December 17. 

Hufnagel feels that painfing 
and drawing are primary ways of 
examining life. She believes that 
to be worthy of life, one must be 
an active participant in it, using 
the talents one has. 

"Artists record in paint as 
writers do in ink. Their work 
can linger in the mind like 
poeuy. They can support their 
beliefs strongly or explore their 
uncertainties reflectively," 
Hufnagel proclaims. 

Hufnagel uses the local scene 
as a subject matter and also 
domestic and intimate subjects. 
Some of Hufnagel's more exotic 
subjects are the results of her 
travel inspirations. Because their 



depiction satisfies her interest in 
color and line, flowers are one of 
Hufnagel's favorite focuses. 

For additional information 
about Jeanne Hufnagel's 
exhibition, please call 226-2720. 






Editor's Correction: 

In last week*s issue of the Clarion Call, it was 
stated that first semester freshmen cannot 
pledge a fraternity. First semester men are 
allowed to pledge a fraternity, but first 
semester women cannot pledge a sorority. 



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ra<^c 12 



The C larion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Pa^cl3 



Koinonia Christian Fellowship united students 'at the pole' 



by I) I' bra J. Weinheimer 
Contributinfi Writer 

On Wednesday September 15 
al 7 a.m., approximately 50 
student.s met at the tlajipole next 
to lounders Hall to pray for the 
siudenis, faculty, and adminis- 
tration of Cliirion University. 

The students were participating 
in a world-wide day of student 
prayer called '\See You at the 
Pole." This event began in 1989 
as a vision of a few students in 
I'exas to pray for their friends, 
sch(Hil and country. Their vision 
has become a powerful 
movement of prayer that has 
united high schcx^l and college 
students from almost every city. 



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denomination and ethnic group. 
Last year it is estimated that 
more than one million students 
participated in "See You at the 
Pole." 

Here al Chu^ion, the students 
represented two (^hristian 
l-ellowship groups on campus-- 
Intervarsity Christian l-ellowship 
and Koinonia Christian 
lellowship. The groups meet 
regularly for fellowship, prayer, 
small group Bible studies, 
retreats and conferences. 

Koinonia meets on Monday 
nights at 7:30 p.m. in r(.K>m 252 
Ciemmell Student Center for 
"Monday Night Live." 
Inlervarsity's large group 
meeting is on Tuesday nights at 
7:30 pm in the RAGS lounge in 
Cemmell. Both groups invite 
you to check their organization 
out. 




Debra J. Weinheimer/Clarion Call 
Fifty students participated in Koinonia's "See you at the pole" last Wednesday to pray. 



Phi Sigma Sigma sorority receives national awards 



by Anji Brown 
Features Writer 



"Aim high," slates Phi Sigma 
Sigma president Tanya Schmidt. 
Phi Sigma Sigma is by no means 
an ordinary sorority: they go 
above and beyond the call of 
duty. 

Clarion University's Gamma 
Gamma chapter of Phi Sigma 
Sigma made an outstanding 
achievement al the Leadership 
Training School, Kina of 
Prussia, where Ihey received five 
awards out of the forty-five 
given. About 105 Phi Sigma 
Sigma chapters attended this 
event, and yet none of them 
bested Clarion University's own 
Phi Sinma Siamas. 

The live awards received were 
the Individual Scholarship given 
to Jen Homer, Undergraduate of 



the Year given to Leslie 
Cathcart, the National Ritual 
Award, the 100% Initiation 
Award and having the Best 
Understanding of Sorority 
Pledges Award given to the 
chapter. Schmidt slates, "We 
proved ourselves by coming 
back with (these) five national 
awards. 

Phi Sigma Sigma's services 
range from helping the elderly 
set up for bingo to raising money 
for the National Kidney 
Foundation. This sorority is al.so 
active in helping the Junior 
Olympics, and have been known 
to put in 326 service hours in one 
semester. 

ITiis year, to riiise money for 
the National Kidney Foundation, 
Phi Sigma Sigma is putting 
together a Rock-a-thon with the 



Kappa Delta Rho fraternity. Phi 
Sigma Sigma has many other 
charities planned for this year. 

Phi Sigma Sigma has been 
very successful since they came 
to Clarion in 1971 . Their pledge 
program lasts eight weeks, but 
while pledging, they consider the 
pledge to be a sister instead of 
just an associate member. 

Tanya Schmidt joined the 
organization in the spring of 
1991. She says she instantly fell 
at home with her sisters and did 



not feel the pressure to confonn 
to any image. Schmidt states, 
"The sisters accepted me for who 

I was." ^^^. 

Study hours are highly stressed 
in Phi Sigma Sigma. Because of 
this, they were number one for 
receiving scholarships. Every 
year. Phi Sigma Sigma must 
have a quota of 60 women to 
join, and they have never fallen 
under Uial quota. 



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Annual Hills Lock Up 

Child victims of Cystic Fibrosis will throw themselves 

behind bars and raise bail to free themselves from the 

confines of this #1 genetic disease. 

"Jail site" in center court of North Hills Village Mall, Pittsburgh 
Sunday, September 26, n«on-3 p.m. 

Scheduled to appear: Cap'n Crunch, Chuck E. Cheese, 
McDonald's (Grimace, B(X)t's 'n (Jarters country dancers and 

much morel 

For more inrormation, call the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation at 
(412)321-4422 



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GET ONE FREE 



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V 




by Chuck Shepherd 



-A suspect said to be in his 20s 
escaped after robbing a First 
American Bank branch in 
Nashville, Tennessee in August, 
but not before leaving some of 
the money behind during the 
getaway. The teller had 
managed to give the man a bag 
of "bait" money containing an 
explodable device that would 
coal the money with a dye soon 
after he left the bank. 
Apparently, the man wanted to 
free his hands during the 
getaway and so he stuffed the 
bag into his sweatpants. Said a 
Nashville detective, "We believe 
he may have (dropped the money 
when he) suffered severe burns 
to his groin area. 

-In April, police in Chandler, 
Arizona arrested Arturo Ortiz, 
33, who weighed 135 pounds, 
after he had allegedly broken 
into a home and begun fondling 



a woman as she slept. The 
woman weighed 260 pounds and 
easily subdued Ortiz by twisting 
his wrist behind his back and 
holding him unlil police arrived. 
Said tJie woman, "I'm Uu^ge, and 
he happens to be small." 

-'ITic New York Times reported 
in April that Kansas lawyers 
Michael Harris and Fletcher Bell 
were successful in filing worker 
compensation claims for back 
injuries suffered at work: lUirris 
got almost $35,0(X) for the strain 
of reaching into Uie backseat of 
his car, and Bell got $95,000 for 
his injury lifting his briefcase 
from the trunk of his car. 

-During a nationally televised 
August pre-season game, Denver 
Bronco defensive tackle Darren 
Drozdov, who was in his stance 
opposite the offensive center 
awaiting the snap, vomited on 
the ball. Afterward, he told 
reporters, "I get sick a lot. I was 
a quarterback in high school, and 



I'd start throwing up on my 
center's back. I don't have a lot 
of control out there." 

-In April Associated Press 
profile of North Carolina State 
University veterinarian Greg 
Lewbart reported tliat he is one 
of the few in the country who 
treat pet fish. Dr. Lewbart's fees 
range from $100 for a checkup, 
including X-rays, to $250 for 
surgery. He said business is 
gotxi because it is so difficult to 
keep tropical fish alive in a home 
fish tank. 

-In April in the Republic of Uie 
Congo, Bernadette Obelebouli, 
34, gave birth to triplets, but at 
the rate of one per day for three 
days during a 60-mile journey on 
foot. She assumed she was 
through birthing after she 
delivered the first one, but they 
kept coming. And in Vancouver, 
British Columbia, Joanne March, 
29, gave birth prematurely to the 
first of her triplets on April 30, 



hut doctors decided to leave the 
other two until they were 
healUiier, and Ihcy were bom on 
June 14. 

-In April, The Sun newspaper 
in London reported that 
machinist Craig luunes, who had 
recently experienced constant, 
painful eiyaches, was completely 
cured when doctors removed a 
pregnant spider that had been 
nesting in the ear. Fames 
reportedly now wears earplugs 
when he sleeps, to prevent 
iuiother incident, juid has grown 
fond of the spider, which he 
retained as a pet. 

-The Los Angeles Times 
reported in May Uiat Billy Davis 
has upset his neighbors with 
excessive security precautions 
for his modest home in a middle - 
class neighborhood in Los 
Angeles County. To protect him 
and his wife, Fyrn, Davis has 
outfitted the unpretentious house 
with barred windows, video 
monitors, infrared alanns, razor 
wire, 26 outdoor 500-watt lights 
that flood into neighbors' homes 
at night, various "hair-trigger" 
alarm bells and sirens, and a 
Doberman. Local police say the 
Davises stay up all night because 
of fear of intruders and call 



police for help as much as 60 
limes a month. 

-A Cincinn;iti woman charged 
recently that a 42-year-old man 
sexually assaulted her after 
taking advantage of a medical 
condition which usually causes 
her to faint when .she hears the 
word "sex." Allegedly, the m;ui 
accosted her in her apartment 
building, uttered tlie magic word, 
and then assaulted her after .she 
fell to the floor. In a court 
appearance in July, the woman 
fainted twice when prosecutors 
used the word "sex" in 
descriptions of her condition. 

-Lars Christiansen, 19, and 
Michael Peters, 25, charged in a 
Cierman court in May with 
killing three men last yeiu^ in a 
right-wing political firebombing, 
admitted they had joined the 
neo-Nazi movement in Ciennany. 
Peters had even left a "Hail, 
Hitler" phone message to the 
police after the firebombing. 
However, both men said they 
didn't hate anyone and had 
joined the movement only 
because of the friendship and 
"free beer." 

•(c)1993 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



Clarion artist displays works 



by Sherry Dickerson 
Features Writer 



"I always wanted to be an artist 
so I decided to give it a try," says 
Jeanne Cousins Ilufnagel, a 
Clarion resident. 

Hufnagel received her B.F.A. 
in art from Clarion University in 
May of 1992. She had already 
earned a college degree in home 
economics from Immaculate 
College. Therefore, becoming 
an artist was a dream come true 
for Hufnagel. 

Jccume Hufnagel has had single 
works displayed on occasion and 
did a student exhibit at Clarion 
University, but this is her first 
solo exhibition. Hufnagel's 
exhibit is on display at the 
Women's Studies Center in 
Ihu^'ey Hall. The admission is 
tree and open to the general 
public. 



The exhibition can be seen on 
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday 
from 11 a.m. -4 p.m. and on 
Thursdays from 9 a.m. -4 p.m. 
Hufnagel's works will be 
displayed until December 17. 

Hufnagel feels that painfing 
and drawing are primary ways of 
examining life. She believes that 
to be worthy of life, one must be 
an active pju^ticipant in it, using 
tlie talents one has. 

"Artists record in paint as 
writers do in ink. Their work 
can linger in the mind like 
poetry. They can support their 
beliefs strongly or explore their 
uncertainties reflectively," 
Hufnagel proclaims. 

Hufnagel uses the local scene 
as a subject matter and also 
domestic and intimate subjects. 
Some of Ilufnagers more exotic 
subjects are the results of her 
travel inspirations. Because tiieir 



depiction satisfies her interest in 
color and line, flowers are one of 
Hufnagel's favorite f(x:uses. 

For additional information 
about Jeanne Hufnagel's 
exhibition, please c^ill 226-2720. 



Editor*s Correction: 

In last week's issue of the Clarion Call, it was 
Stated that first semester freshmen cannot 
pledge a fraternity. First semester men are 
allowed to pledge a fraternity, but first 
semester women cannot pledge a sorority. 



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J'iijjc 14 



The Clarion Gall: Thiirsdaj, September 23, 1993 



•rtie'Clarion Call: Thursday, ^eptemfee'r'»;'l\»9i ' 



i^a^ri^ 



Take the In tervarsity Teen Challenge and 'live in the light' student Senator Profiles: Schaub and Thompson are 

one-hundred percent behind the student body 



by John Martinec 
Features Writer 



Clarion Univcrsily's Intcr- 
varsiiy will sponsor Teen 
Challenge on I 'riday, September 
24, 1903. This special 
presentation will be held on the 
Cieminell ould(X)r stage, weather 
permitting. If weather is bad, it 
will be in the Mulli-Purpose 
r(X)m in Geinmell. 

Teen Challenge is a Christian 
organization who opens its dix)rs 
to young men and women who 
have substance abu.sc problems. 
The main focus of the group is to 
help these people by introducing 
the Lord to them and letting 
llim heal the sickness which 
plagues their lives. 

Teen Challenge was started by 
Assemblies of God Pastor David 
Wilkerson in 1958 who, after 
selling the family television, 
filled his evenings with prayer. 
One night Wilkerson felt the 
need to pray for some Brooklyn 
street gang members who were 
charged and put on trial for 
murder. The more he prayed fw 
them the m(x-e he felt the urge to 



venture to New York to help 
them as much as he could. He 
arrived tcx) late to be much help 
to the ganj; members on trial. 
However, the other members of 
the gang saw tJiat his intentions 
were good and thai he really 
wanted to help their friends. 
That g(xxl deed made the others 
in the gang want to listen to 
Wilkerson as he reached out to 
others on the streets. 

Men and women who have 
substance abuse problems can be 
helped in one of two ways. The 
first is to change a person's 
environment. This method is 
followed by most secular 
treatment centers. Teen 
Challenge uses the second, 
which changes a person's 
outlook toward that environ- 
ment. 

Teen Challenge's methods 
seem to be working. ITieir nine- 
month residential program in 
rural Pennsylvania boasts a 
seventy percent cure rate. 
Compared with the ten to fifteen 
percent cure rate achieved by 
psychosociological clinics. Teen 
Challenge seems to be doing 



something right. Hxactly what 
that something is is hard to 
explain, but some secular 
counterparts to Teen Challenge 
call it die "Jesus Factor". 

Ihe "Jesus Factor" is a very 
difficult thing to calculate. 
Other methods used by Teen 
Challenge are easier to explain. 
Teen Challenge uses a more 
intense definition for drug-free. 
Many places declare a person 
drug and alcohol-free if he 
consumes no more than a six- 
pack of beer, one bottJe of wine 
or seven ounces of hard liquor a 
week. A person can even use 
marijuana a maximum of three 
times a month and still be 
considered drug-free. 

Teen Challenge considers a 
person drug-free only when they 
use no drugs or alcohol at all- 
this includes nicotine. This 
could explain the fact that 86 
percent of Teen Challenge 
graduates are still drug-free 
seven years after coming out of 
the program. Many graduates of 
Teen Challenge go on to college 
and some start their own 
businesses. 



Teen Challenge also urges 
people to be tested for die life- 
Uireatening disease AIDS. Ihey 
give people in high risk groups 
die confidence they need to want 
to get tested. 

If you wonder what would 
make a group of people who 
usually hide from AIDS testing 
suddenly want to find out if they 
have the dreaded disease, the 
answer could be found in one 
man's remarks. He slated that 
his life of immorality, drugs and 
sex made him a target for AIDS. 
Teen Challenge helped him 
study the Bible and find the 
Lord. This made him want to 
change the Uiings he wanted to 
do. 

Reality taught Uie people who 
started Teen Challenge that diey 
cannot change a murder, rapist or 
diief by Uiemselves, only Jesus 
could do it. People who go 
through the program are taught 
to "live in the light" or live in 
group hamiony through truth. 

At present, there are 107 
centers. Seventy-four offer 
residential care. Twenty-five are 
long term training centers. 



Enrollment to these centers is 
strictly voluntary. Anyone may 
leave at any time. The people 
who enter Teen Challenge do not 
need to be teenagers. Many 
people are past their teenage 
years. The type of person who 
joins has also changed. They lu-e 
no longer just inner-city youths. 
Many come from middle to 
upper-class families. 

Diane Geyer, president of 
Intervarsity, says Teen Challenge 
is "on fire for God" and she 
recommends that everyone 
come out to see Uiem. She also 
invites anyone interested in 
Intervarsity to come join them 
for Uieir weekly meetings. They 
are on Tuesday nights at 7:30 in 
the Gemmell Center, RACS 
room. 

Teen Challenge promises to be 
a night of good Christian 
fellowship mixed with a frenzy 
of learning for everyone. This 
presentation is free and open to 
anyone ready to leam what God 
has done through Teen 
Challenge. There will also be a 
bonfire following at the 
Nair/Wilkinson fire rings. 



German artist exhibit at Sanford Gallery 



by Ron Santillo 
Features Writer 



Tlie drypoint etchings of Bert 
Van Bork is die first exhibit of 
die year at die Sanford Gallery in 
Marwick-Boyd. The free exhibit 
is open to the public and 
continues until September 23. 
The Sanford Gallery is open 
from noon-5 p.m. on Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday, and 
noon-8 p.m. on Tuesday and 
Thursday. 

Bom in Auguslberg, Germany 



in 1928, Van Bork studied 
painting and graphic art at the 
Hochshcule/fur Bildrende 
Kunste, Berlin, and the 
Hochschule/fur Graphik and 
Buchkunst, Leipzig. The art of 
Van Bork is not only displayed 
in Gennany, but internationally 
as well in London, Hawaii, 
Evanston and Chicago, Illinois, 
where he has lived and worked 
since 1954. 

Van Bork has always shown a 
love for American cities, most 
notably the New York City 



skyline. For him die skyscraper 
is a symbol of aspiration and 
faiUi. He feels the skyline is not 
only a physical representation of 
its facts of life, but a potential 
work of art. 

As for many artists. Van Bork 
has always had an interest in 
foreign cultures, especially diat 
of the North American Indians. 
Van Bork first got a sense for die 
Indian cultures through the 
novels by Karl May. 

Aldiough he has shown great 
interest in the NorUi American 
Indians, Van Bork admits that his 
greatest love is in Uie Hopi and 
Zuni cultures of the Southwest. 
He puts to use odier objects in 
the city in a way similar to diat 
of various painted Indian pottery 





photo courtesy of Lakeside Studio 
German artist Bert Van Bork displays drypoint etchings. 






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Must use within 3 months 



CSA Recognition 
Awards 

Applications are due 

by October 1 

in the Student Senate 

office, room 269 

Gemmell. 



by Amy Gerkin 
Features Editor 



A common goal is pursued by 
two ambitious young senators: 
to make positive improvements 
for the students of Clarion 
University. 

Amy Schaub, junior 
conmiunication/ political science 
major, and Kelly Thompson, 
sophomore finance major, are 
two members of our Student 
Senate who are willing to 
represent die voices of die entire 
student body. 

As chairperson of the 
Legislative Affairs Committee, 
Schaub hopes to convince more 
students to write letters to the 
State System of Higher 
Education. This committee 
keeps the student body aware of 
political situations on die local, 
state and federal levels which 
will affect the students. 

Schaub is also a member of the 
Senate's Public J^elations 
CommV^^and is a student 
r&es^luJive of the Fbundation 
/Qvisory Board. Other projects 
site and her fellow senators are 
Lde a time 




capsil 



ea during ALF, 



and getting a higher number of 
students to register to vote on 
campus. 

The size of die university and 
the classes are what Schaub 
considers Clarion's best asset. "I 
am a person and not a number. 
If a professor sees me on 
campus, he or she knows that 
I'm in diat class." She feels Uiat 
"The extra-curricular activities 
Clarion offers so all students, no 
matter what diey are interested 
in, can get involved," is also a 
plus. 

However, as a senator, Schaub 
sees some apathy among the 
students. "More students need to 
get involved. It seems diere are 
only a small majority who get 
involved and participate, not 
only in organizations, but also in 
campus issues." 

Amy Schaub also feels diat die 
students' needs should be taken 
more seriously. "The 

administration needs to 
remember first and foremost that 
we are students. Our ^^cation 
is important to us. Cliass sizes 
need to be kept small, class 
meeting times afed seryiee& on 
campus should nc 





Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Amy Schaub and Kelly Thiompson's goals are to make CUP 
an even better place to experience collegiate life. 

senator, Schaub is also a member 



Besides bet»t a stadent 



of the Alpha Sigma Tau sorority, 
and is a resident assistant in 
Campbell Hall. 

Amy Schaub would like to 
address the student body by 
saying, "Many students feel the 
Student Senate does not do 
anything. However, after 
working on the Senate for four 
semesters, I can prpye that is 
\yrong. I just want .everyone to 
know diat we are here for you. 




by 



Dept. honors jtudent authors 



DiFram^esco 



%f— ■ 



#"n-: 



Featurei Writer 



It was tim'^ for the English 
Department and last year's 
stu(tent^ of English 105 and 11 1 
to shine and shine they did. 

The English Department 
honored its student authors on 
Tuesday, September 21 at the 
Gemmell Student Center. On 
hand to present die awards was 
Dr. Larry Dennis, Head of the 
English Department. Also on 
hand was Vince Straub 
representing Harper-Collins 
Publishers, which publishes the 
English textbooks. 

The essays of die 37 students 
who were honored were selected 
on the basis of organization, 
content and voice. They were 
published in two separate books. 
Clarion Voices: English 105. and 
Clarion Voices: English 111 . 
These books will then be used 
for next year's students taking 
these respective classes. 

Others in the audience were 
the beaming professors. Each 
professor who was recognized 
by a student couldn't help 
themselves from having a huge 



i^ smile appear on his or JHf^|ax. 
Nor should they have lo|it v^j^ 
proud day. This was di^nitely a 
time for die English E)epiuinieht 
to pat itself on the back. Dr. 
Dennis summed it up by saying, 
"I believe writing is the 
backbone of the English 
Department." 

Since many of the essays 
weren't able to be published in 
this year's editions, they were 
saved for next year, which will 
bring many of these same 
students back for anodier award. 

This year's award winners 
were in English 105: James 
Alcorn, Jennifer Alcott, Jill 
Brady, Kyle Burgess, Kara 
DePassio, Patricia Deibler, 
Patricia Geiger, Eric Hale, Tma 
Hartle, Erick Hecksher, Paul 
Hite, Mike Hodil, Wendy 
McKain, Sarmed Mirza, Sheila 
Morris, DeAnna Niedbala, 
Melissa Porter, Donna Reinsel, 
Brian Rowan, Marie Schmitl, and 
Thomas Terza. 

The winners of English 111 
were: Amy M. Banner, Marcus 
P. Bingham (2), Debbie 
FitzGerald, Melissa Gruver- 



Crawford, Erin Hawk, Rebecca 
Hetrick, Christine Hunt, Tlieresa 
Kinsinger, Kathleen Lippert, Jay 
Marshall, Kristen Molek, 
Malcolm X. Mosely, Brenna 
Phillips, Evan S. Pippen, Becky 
Shirey (2), and Thomas L. Terza. 
Congratulations to all the 
students who were honored at 
Uiis event. 



We were elected to represent 

you." 

Kelly Thompson, Senator 

One of the primary reasons 
why Kelly Thompson chose to 
come to Clarion University was 
the friendly atmosphere created 
by the students and staff. But 
Thompson decided to run for 
Student Senate to uy to improve 
even that vir^ i:.m "i.i ; 

Thompson fi^els that, "Clapion 
needs to be more responsive to 
the students' needs. The 
university does some diings, but 
I feel that more attention should 
be focused on student concerns." 
Thompson also says that Clarion 
University is facing several 
problems, especially campus 
safety and cultural diversity. 

Kelly Thompson is the 
chairperson for Student Senate's 
Appropriations Committee, 



which recommends to the Senate 
the allocation and distribution of 
any and/or all CSA (Clarion 
Students Association) funds. 
They also recommend to the 
Senate that, if necessary, audits 
be done for die financial needs 
of any or all student 
organizations, departments, or 
persons requesting or receiving 
allocaUons. 

Thompson's goal for the 
Appropriations Committee is to 
affectively budget for all CSA 
organizations and to decide upon 
supplemental and capital 
requests made by those 
organizations. Her goal as a 
member of the Legislative 
Affairs Committee is to make die 
students aware of die legislation 
that affects diem. 

Other than being a student 
senator, Kelly Thompson is a 
member of the Financial 
Management Association, the 
Pre-Law Club, and Phi Eta 
Sigma honorary fraternity. 

Creating the best possible 
collegiate experience for the 
students is one of Thompson's 
personal goals of being a senator. 
_She would like to tell the 
students to "utilize dae university 
resources, to go to die activities 
that are offered, and to get 
involved in some campus 
organizations." 

Both Kelly Thompson and 
Amy Schaub are just two of the 
20 student senators who will 
make sure that all students' 
issues, complaints, concerns or 
recognitions will be taken care 
of. 



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J';i"f 14 



I he Clariiin (nil: llnir.s(lii>.Sc|)tc'iiilHr 23, 1W3 



The Clarion Call: Thursday. September 23. IMW 



Page 15 



Take the In tervarsity Teen Challenge and 'live in the light' student Senator Profiles: Schaub and Thompson are 

one-hundred percent behind the student body 



hy John Martinic 
Features Writer 



Clarion nnivLTMiy's Inlcr- 
varsiiy will sponsor Iccn 
Challcniic on Inclay, Sopicinhcr 
24. I<)9.V Ihis special 
prcscnialion will he lickl on ihc 
Cicinincll ouUl(H)r staiic, wcalher 
pcnnininj:. 11 weather is bad, it 
will be in the Multi-Purpose 
RKMH in (ieniinell. 

leen Challenge is a Christian 
organization who opens it.s dtK)rs 
to young men and women who 
have substiuice abuse problems. 
The main locus ol the group is to 
help these people by introducing 
the Lord to them and letting 
Ilim heal the sickness which 
plagues their lives. 

Teen Challenge was stiirted by 
Assemblies of Cuxl Pastor David 
Wilkerson in 1958 who, after 
.selling the family television, 
filled his evenings wiili prayer. 
One night Wilkerson felt the 
need to pray for some Brcx)klyn 
street gang members who were 
charged and put on trial for 
murder. The more he prayed for 
them the more he fell the urge to 



venture to New York to help 
them as much as he could. He 
arrived too late U) be much help 
to the gang members on trial. 
However, the other members of 
the g;mg saw that his intentions 
were good and that he really 
wanted to help their friends. 
I'hat gcHXl deed made the others 
in the gang want to listen to 
Wilkerson as he reached out to 
others on the streets. 

Men and women who have 
substiuice abuse problems can be 
helped in one of two ways. The 
first is to change a person's 
environment. This method is 
followed by most secular 
treatment centers. Teen 
Challenge uses the second, 
which changes a person's 
outlook toward that environ- 
ment. 

Teen Challenge's methods 
seem to be working. Their nine- 
month residential program in 
rural Pennsylvania boasts a 
seventy percent cure rale. 
Compared with the ten to fifteen 
percent cure rale achieved by 
psychosociological clinics, Teen 
Challenge seems to be doing 



something right. I'xaclly what 
thai something is is hard to 
explain, but some secular 
counterparts to leen Challenge 
call it Die "Jesus I'actor". 

The "Jesus l-actor" is a very 
difficult thing to calculate. 
Other methods used by Teen 
Challenge are easier to explain. 
Teen Challenge uses a more 
intense definition for drug-free. 
Many places declare a person 
drug and alcohol-free if he 
consumes no more than a six- 
pack of beer, one bottle of wine 
or seven ounces of h;u-d liquor a 
week. A person can even u.se 
marijuana a maximum of three 
limes a month and still be 
considered drug-free. 

Teen Challenge considers a 
person drug-free only when they 
u.se no drugs or alcohol at all- 
this includes nicotine. This 
could explain the fact that 86 
percent of Teen Challenge 
graduates are still drug-free 
seven years after coming out of 
the program. Many graduates of 
Teen Challenge go on to college 
and some start their own 
businesses. 



German artist exhibit at Sanford Gallery 



hy Ron Sontillo 
Features Writer 



Tlie drypoint etchings of Bert 
Van Bork is liie lirst exhibit of 
tiie year at Uic Siuiford Callery in 
Miirwick-Boyd. The free exhibit 
is open to the public and 
continues until vSeplember 23. 
Ihe Sanford (iallery is open 
from noon-S p.m. on Monday, 
Wednesday and I'riday, and 
noon-8 p.m. on Tuesday and 
Thursday. 

Bt)m in Augustberg, Gennany 



in 1928, Van Bork studied 
painting and graphic art at the 
Hochshcule/fur Bildrende 
Kunste, Berlin, and the 
Hochschule/fur Graphik and 
Buchkunst, Leipzig. The art of 
Van Bork is not only displayed 
in Gennany, but internationally 
as well in London, Hawaii, 
Evanston and Chicago, Illinoi.s, 
where he has lived and worked 
.since 1954. 

Vjui Bork has always shown a 
love for American cities, most 
notably the New York City 



XoiLBet 




skyline. For him the skyscraper 
is a symbol of aspiration and 
faith. }le feels the skyline is not 
only a physical representation of 
its facts of life, but a potential 
workof iui. 

As for many ju-lists, Viui Bork 
has always had an interest in 
foreign cultures, especially Uiai 
of the North American Indians. 
Van Bork first got a sense for the 
Indian cultures through the 
novels by Karl May. 

Although he has shown great 
interest in the North American 
Indians, Van Bork admits that his 
greatest love is in the Hopi and 
Zuni cultures of the Southwest. 
He puts to use other objects in 
I the city in a way simiUy to dial 
of various painted Indian pottery 
desicns. 



leen Challenge also urges 
people to be tested lor Uie life- 
tJireatening disease AIDS. They 
give people in high ri.sk groups 
tlie confidence they need to want 
to get tested. 

If you wonder what would 
make a group of people who 
usually hide from AIDS testing 
suddenly wjuu to find out if tiiey 
have the dreaded disea.se, the 
answer could be found in one 
man's remarks. He stated that 
his life of immonility, drugs and 
sex made him a txirget for AIDS. 
Teen Challenge helped him 
study the Bible and find the 
Lord. I his made him want to 
change the tilings he wanted to 
do. 

Reality taught tlie people who 
started Teen Challenge that tliey 
cannot change a murder, rapist or 
thief by themselves, only Jesus 
could do it. People who go 
through the program are taught 
to "live in the light" or live in 
group harmony through truth. 

At present, there are 107 
centers. Seventy-four offer 
residential care. Twenty-five are 
long term training centers. 



Lnrollment to these centers is 
strictly voluntary. Anyone may 
leave at any time. The people 
who enter Teen Challenge do not 
need to be teenagers. Many 
people are past their teenage 
years. The type of person who 
joins has also changed. They are 
no longer just inner-city youths. 
Many come from middle to 
upper-class fjunilies. 

Diane Geyer, president of 
Interviirsity, says Teen Challenge 
is "on fire for God" and she 
recommends that everyone 
come out to .see them. She also 
invites anyone interested in 
Intervarsity to come join them 
for tlieir weekly meetings. They 
mc on Tuesday nights at 7:30 in 
the Gemmell Center, RACS 
rcx)m. 

Teen Challenge promises to be 
a night of good Christian 
fellowship mixed with a frenzy 
of learning for everyone. This 
presentation is free and open to 
anyone ready to learn what God 
has done through Teen 
Challenge. There will also be a 
bonfire following at the 
Nair/Wilkinson fire rings. 




photo courtesy of Lakeside Studio 
German artist Bert Van Bork displays drypoint etchings. 



Super Tuesday 

$10 Student Haircuts 
(must have Student I.D.) 



mmmm 











Stand-up Booth 
& Tanning Bed 

Tanning Specials 

15 sessions for $35 
Must use within 3 months 



CSA Recognition 
Awards 

Applications are due 

by October 1 

in the Student Senate 

office, room 269 

Gemmell. 



m 



by Amy Gerkin 
Features Flditor 



A eonunon goal is pursued by 
two ambihous young senators: 
to make positive improvements 
for the students of Clarion 
University. 

Amy Schaub, junior 
conununicalion/ political science 
major, and Kelly Thompson, 
sophomore finance major, are 
two members of our Student 
Senate who are willing to 
represent the voices of the entire 
student body. 

As chairperson of the 
Legislative Affairs Committee, 
Schaub hopes to convince more 
students to write letters to the 
State System of Higher 
F.ducation. This committee 
keeps the student body aware of 
political situations on tlie local, 
slate and federal levels which 
will affect die students. 

Schaub is also a member of Uie 
Senate's Public Relations 



Committct^.and is a student 
represetitative of the Foundation 
Advisory Board. Other projects 
she and her fellow senators are 
wprk^i||^gn^|o|:lude a time 
capsule to 1^ buried during ALF, 



and getting a higher number of 
students to register to vote on 
campus. 

The size of the university iuid 
the classes are what Schaub 
considers Clarion's best asset. "I 
am a person and not a number. 
If a professor sees me on 
campus, he or she knows that 
I'm in that class." She feels that 
"The extra-curricular activities 
(Clarion offers .so all students, no 
matter what they are interested 
in, can get involved," is also a 
plus. 

However, as a senator, Schaub 
sees some apathy among the 
students. "More students need to 
get involved. It seems there are 
only a small majority who get 
involved and participate, not 
only in orgiuiizaUons, but also in 
campus issues." 

Amy Schaub also feels that the 
students' needs should be tiiken 
more seriously. "The 

administration needs to 
remember first and foremost tliat 
we arc students. Our ediication 
is important to us. Class sizes 
need to be kept small, class 
meeting times and services on 
campus .should not^be cut3' 
Besides being a student 





Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Amy Schaub and Kelly Thompson's goals are to make CUP 
an even better place to experience collegiate life. 

senator, Schaub is al.so a member 



of the Alpha Sigma I'au sorority, 
and is a resident assistant in 
Campbell Hall. 

Amy Schaub would like to 
address the student body by 
saying, "Many students feel the 
Student Senate does not do 
anything. However, after 
working on the Senate for four 
semesters, I can prove that is 
wrong. I just want everyone to 
know Uiat we are here for you. 



English Dept. honors student authors 



hy Fhiiip DiFrancesco 
Features Writer 

It was time for the English 
Department and last year's 
students of English 105 and 111 
to shine and shine they did. 

The English Department 
honored its student authors on 
Tuesday, September 21 at the 
Gemmell Student Center. On 
hand to present the awards was 
Dr. Larry Dennis, Head of the 
English Department. Also on 
hand was Vince Straub 
representing Harper-Collins 
Publishers, which publishes the 
English textbtwks. 

The essays of the 37 students 
who were honored were selected 
on the basis of organization, 
content and voice. They were 
published in two separate books. 
Clarion Voices: English 105 . and 
Clarion Voices: English 111 . 
Fhese books will then be used 
for next year's students taking 
these respective classes. 

Others in the audience were 
Ihe beaming professors. Each 
professor who was recognized 
by a student couldn't help 
themselves from having a huge 



smile appejtf on his or nir face 
Nor should diey have to; it v^ a 
proud day. This was definitely a 
time for tlie English Department 
to pal itself on the back. Dr. 
Dennis summed it up by saying, 
"I believe writing is the 
backbone of the English 
Department." 

Since many of the essays 
weren't able to be published in 
this year's editions, they were 
saved for next year, which will 
bring many of these same 
students back for another award. 

This year's award winners 
were in English 105: James 
Alcorn, Jennifer Alcotl, Jill 
Brady, Kyle Burgess, Kara 
DeFassio, Patricia Deibler, 
Patricia Gciger, Eric Hale, Tina 
Hartle, Erick Hecksher, Paul 
Hite, Mike Hodil, Wendy 
McKain, Sanned Mirza, Sheila 
Morris, DeAnna Niedbala. 
Melissa Porter, Donna Reinsel, 
Brian Rowan, Mark Schmitt, and 
Thomas Terza. 

The winners of English 111 
were: Amy M. Banner, Msu-cus 
P. Bingham (2), Debbie 
FiizCierald, Melissa Gruver- 



Crawford, Erin Hawk, Rebecca 
Helrick, Christine Hunt, Theresa 
Kinsinger, KaUileen Lippert, Jay 
Marshall, Kristen Molek, 
Malcolm X. Mosely, Brenna 
Phillips, Evan S. Pippen, Becky 
Shirey (2), and Thomas L. Terza. 
Congratulations to all the 
students who were honored at 
lliis event. 



We were elected to represent 

you." 

Kelly Thompson, Senator 

One of the primary reasons 
why Kelly Thompson chose to 
come to Clarion University was 
the friendly atmosphere created 
by the students and staff. But 
Thompson decided to run for 
Student Senate to try to improve 
even Uiat. 

Thompson feels Uiat, "ClaFion 
needs to be more responsive to 
the students' needs. The 
university does some Uiings, but 
I feel that more attention should 
be focused on student concerns." 
Thompson also says that (^hirion 
University is facing several 
problems, especially campus 
sjifety and cultural diversity. 

Kelly Thompson is the 
chairperson for Student Senate's 
Appropriations Committee, 



wliich recommends lo the Senate 
the alliK'alion and distrihulion of 
any and/or all CSA (Clarion 
Students Association) funds. 
They also recommend to the 
Senate that, if necessary, audits 
be done for the linancial needs 
of any or all student 
organizations, departments, or 
persons requesting or receiving 
allocations. 

Thompson's goal for the 
Appropriations Committee is to 
affectively budget for all CSA 
organizations and to decide uptm 
supplemental and capital 
requests made by those 
organizations. Her goal as a 
member of the Legislative 
Affairs Cc^mmittec is to miikc the 
students awiu'c ol the legislation 
dial affects ilicin. 

Other than being a student 
senator, Kelly Thompson is a 
member of the Tinancial 
Management Association, the 
Pre-Law Club, and Phi l-ta 
Sigma honorary fraternity. 

Creating the best possible 
collegiate experience for the 
students is one of Thomp.son's 
personal gojils of being a senator. 
She would like to tell the 
students to "utilize the university 
resources, to go to the activities 
that are offered, and to net 
involved in some campus 
organizations." 

Both Kelly Thompson and 
Amy Schaub iire just two of the 
20 student senators who will 
make sure that all students' 
issues, complaints, concerns or 
recognitions will be taken care 
oL 



^Q.r^\ 



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:£)vr)[l,{^ 



Comics,cards & 

Collector supplies 

Monday-Saturday 

Noon-5:30 

Friday 
Noon-7:00 

(Open earlier by chance) 

Phone 227-2544 

Located on South 6th Ave 
Accross from the Loomis 



WELCOME BACK! 
Tlowzrs 'n Bou;s 

625 Wood St. 
226-7171 

20% OFF 

any fresh flower sale of $10.00 or more 
('^Excludes wire orders) 

WE DELIVER 

Expires: 9/30/93 



I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Page 16 



I . 



The tfarion Call: Thurscfayr^eptemFer 1171993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Page n 



Entertainment 



THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 




"OK, ma'am, you said you warned your husband 

to put the newspaper down or you'd blow 

him away. . . . Did he respond?" 




The woods were dark and foreboding, and Alice sensed 

that sinister eyes were watching her every step. Worst 

of all, she knew that Nature abhorred a vacuum. 



:Crossword answers: 



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10 I) A$>»-0^- 




L 1964 Chfonicte Features 
Oistnbutad by Univefsal Press Syndicate 



^«i#»0«0-l 




y 





"Fools! They made me into a free-range chicken 
and man, I never looked back." 



When imprinting studies go awry 



Doonesbury 



BY GARRY TRUDEAU 



PRESIPeNT KJN6, 1 VtMl THINK 
Ml APPRBClAre^ JU^HOUJ 
STR^eSfULfTiaFmA 9TVPeHT 
0FCaORT0COMaTDAV?A- 
pmONALLV miTB: UHlVm^Tf.. 




P5AN BRCa^, FOR "fBARS MIHOK- 
niee ANP IWMBN HAVd. F0U6HT 

TO Be- mcLUQiV IN The- canon! 
eomim5T their. om^wnoNs 

m STUQIFPAPAKT FROM IT? 





UJOIaJ... 50Ma 
UNB5UBVABLy 
STRONG LANOJAee 
IN TH5 STUPeNTS' 

PeMANPSI 




uuhatan impact 
you've HAP SIR. I. 

ICANTBBUBVB 
The CHORUS OF 
PeOPlB CAUr 
IN6F0R \ 

YOUR 

HtAP! 




H| me biupeNib. \H 

^M THtFACULTf.THe « 

H peANS, me ALUMNI, W 
B/ THeTRL/5Tees,eveN \w 

■f/ yOUR OWN STAFF \1 
■f ARB'XFBAMINe ^^/^\ 
m FOR YOUR --^ J^K 
m REMOVAL 1 /^H^ 


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ANPUJHY 

eXACTLY 

ARBU/^ 

ALLSMieee 

ABOUT 
THIS'' 

/ 



POH'TYOUSBe, 
SIRi YOUPIPIV 
you BROUGHT 

The CAMPUS 
W6£THER! 




Entertainment 



Creature Feature 



By D. H. Aarons 



/^ So. This is our] 7feS^ 7 Not quite whml 1 ) » ^^ 
V y big Debut. } ^^^ ^<L^ expected. f J' 





^-IT Mmybe we sbovld do sometbiflg \^ 



fuiifij. 




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Ibis blows. 1 ain't nobody's tmiiied monkeyT 






t have to be fnniiy 
fill-in cartoon. 



Calvin and Hobbes 



by Bill Watterson 



\F V^fD LIKE TO GO ' 
TO.TMt ZDf^ToOM 




H^RDER !T \5 TO T^KE 
DEC\SWE ^CT^OH 




OHCE NOO BECOVAE 
iHEORlAED, 100 ST^RT 

sesChg complex \T\ES 
mo sw^0Es ^ 

OF GRM 




\s ^s CLE\R m) 3\\m£ 

AS \T FIRST ^PPE^RS. 
ULT\M^TELS, KHOWLE06E 
\S PARMMZ\?AG. 




BE\UG A MAH OF ^a^O^A 
I eAHT AFFORO TO TAKE 
"WAT <^ISIC . , 



YOU'RE IGHOR.NHT, 
BUT AT LEAST 
100 ^CJ OK \T. 




THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
1 Louver 
5 Adds liquor to 
10 Doorway part 

14 Materral tor 
flooring 

1 5 Likeness 

16 S-shaped 
molding 

17 Mr. Sriarif 

18 Burn a little 

19 Stringed 
instrument 

20 Licenses 
22 Most 

uninteresting 

24 Makes Indignant 

25 Merriment 

26 Mount — 
(Washington's 
home) 

29 Unsullied 

33 Pertaining to 
birds 

34 Lean 

35 Uncle — 

36 Gloomy 
covering 

37 Nasal speech 
36 "I cannot 

tell — ■■ 

39 Work in verse 

40 Holy one 

41 Kitchen Item 

42 Be like 

44 Heavy beer 

45 Move on wheels 

46 Sod 

47 Safe place 
SO Recites 

musk^ally 

54 Surmounting 

55 Defile 

58 After-bath 
garment 

59 Young horse 

60 Kind of oranqe 



1 


2 


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10 


11 


12 


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C)l993 Tnbuno Media Services 
12 



AM Riohts Resarvoo 

61 Duck-like bird 

62 Remnants 

63 Longed 

64 River in 
Austria 

DOWN 

1 Standstill 

2 Rickey flavoring 

3 Winglike 

4 Station 

5 Lend an ear 

6 Wrongly 

7 TInplate vessel 

8 Kind of timer 

9 Young plant 

10 City in Illinois 

11 Fever 



13 

21 
23 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 

30 
31 
32 
34 

37 

38 

40 



New York team 

Borscht 

ingredient 

An element 

Take a break 

Concede 

Steam 

Get away from 

Makes angry 

Tool lor 

smoothing 

Alt 

Artless 

Asian ruler 

Drink greedily 

Place mat's 

place 

Service branch 

Air pollutant 



41 Classify 

43 Explodes 

44 Kicked a pigskin 

46 Hint of color 

47 Track event 

48 School on the 
Thames 

49 Pleat 

51 Time for lunch 

52 Black 

53 Hardens 

56 "Do — say, 
not ..." 

57 Writer Fleming 






^HE FAR SIPE 



By GARY LARSON 



Ihe Mmes ^eGive Bogs 




JHelio. Jam Knowh ^^ 
VeY^org, Destroyer of CTats 
lar\d Devoarer of ChicVien: 



^ Jam Zornorph,il^<r One: 

Vlho Coiner i?y ^^^^^ '^o -^ 

fht Neighbor's yard, ar^d 

I -t^'i IS. Princess. Sl^eemna^^ 

BarKer of 6>reaff\mo)/ar\ce ar^ 




^^^^ 



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^m^h 



ThQ Cl^ripn Cpll: Thqrsday, Septeqiber 23, 1*^3 , 




What do you think should 
be done to heighten 
awareness of sexual 
assault on campus? 



CALL'ON-YOU 
compiled by 
Terri Steigelman 




The't^larion'iC^alr: tftur^ii^^ 



» I 



Pagel9* 



Tracy Smock 

Senior, Philosophy 

"More publicity of the problems. That would 

mean a bit less covering over of the problems." 





Jodi Black 

Freshman, Elementary Ed. 

"People should know what's going on. An 

escort service should be started." 



Don Sturges 

Freshman, Secondary Ed./English 

"Each building should have several 

people available to escort." 




Dan Swanson 

Senior, Speech Pathology and Audiology 

"I think the students need to know that 

rape does happen in small communities." 





ex 




Bill Gavrish 

Sophomore, Business 

"1 think that the students should use the 

free taxi service provided by IFC." 




I M fi t%i MnJA It L I . 




Lon A. Priestas 

Junior, Business 

'More programs with guest speakers and 

more publicity for S.T.A.R." 



Carmen Ussack 

Senior, Psychology 

"The university should be more open about 

the statistics." 



Sports 



Eagles drop to 0-2 



Clarion comeback falls short, 35-23 



By Nathan Kahl 
Sportswriter 



28-0. That was the score 
before the Golden Eagles 
managed to put a single point on 
the board against New Haven on 
Saturday; not a very good 
beginning when you're trying to 
beat the number two ranked team 
in the country. 

By that time, New Haven 
running back Roger Graham had 
amassed the majority of his 223 
rushing yards, and had scored 
three of the four New Haven 
TD's. 

Clarion wasn't without 
opportunities, however. The 
Eagles' Paul Cramer missed two 
long field soals of 47 and 42 
yards, and his 46 yarder at the 
end of the half was partially 
blocked. This, along with four 
turnovers in the first half, gave 
the dangerous New Haven 
offense the position to strike 
quickly. 

The wet field, which coach 
Gene Sobolewski described as a 
"quagmire," may have hindered 
Clarion's game. Sobolewski fell 
that, although the defense 
played well. New Haven's 
offense could better handle the 
slippery field conditions; 
especially the explosive Graham, 
who finished with 310 all- 
purpose yards on the day. "He's 
one of the best tailbacks I've 
ever seen," Sobolewski said. 

Despite the lopsided score, the 
Eagles played well offensively. 
They rolled up 398 total yards 
with quarterbacks Chris Zak and 
Craig Ray combining for 255 
yards and back Damien Henry 
rushing for 122. 

When the Eagle's finally did 
score, they did it in an 
impressive fashion. Starting at 
their own 35 with seven minutes 
left in the third quarter, fn"*"*'-'^ 
Art Grec^o- »usned for nine 
yards. On the next play Zak hit 
Marlon Worthy for a 49 yard 
gain to the New Haven seven 
yard line, and Henry ran around 
the right side on the ensuing play 
to erase the goose egg on the 
score board under VISITOR. 

Zak hit tight end Tim Brown 
for the two point conversion. 
Clarion cut the point 



differential to 13 early in the 4th 
quarter. The Eagles ran the ball 
five times to get down to the 
New Haven two where Gregory 
punched it in. After the extra 
point the score was 28-15. 

The Clarion defense was 
stifling the powerful Charger 
offense, and after pinning New 
Haven deep in their own 
territory, the Eagles had forced 
them to punt. Great field 
position was almost certain for 
the Eagles, and slowly but 
surely, the momentum was 
swaying Clarion's way. Then, 



disaster struck. 

The New Haven punt was 
short, and return specialist 
Marlon Worthy opted to let it 
drop. After a short discussion. 
The officials ruled that the ball 
had hit WorUiy on the leg. The 
Clarion sideline vehemently 
argued that the ball did not touch 
Worthy, but to no avail. "It was 
one of the worst calls I've ever 
seen," Sobolewski said later. 
New Haven recovered. Clarion 
never would. 

With field position on die 
Clarion 17, New Haven soon 




Pat McDevitt/Clarion Call 
Tight end Ryan Alleman (80) and the Clarion Golden Eagles will 
trot Into Westminster on Saturday , desperately seeking a win for 
a chance at the Div. 11 playoffs In December. 



extended their lead to 35-17. 

Zak organized a well- designed 
two minute drill, hitting Jess 
Quinn three times while 
marching down the field. With 
six seconds left in the game, he 
found Quinn again, this time for 
a touchdown, but it was too litUe 
too late. The clock ran out on 
the Eagles with Uie final score 
standing at 35-23. 

Although they fell behind 
early, the Eagles played well, 
and thoroughly outplayed the 
number two ranked Chargers 
over the final quarter and a half. 

A few early mistakes hurt the 
Eagles' chances, but their late 
surge may be the spark that 
ignites an Eagle winning streak. 

Next week, the Eagles will 
visit Westminster, a team that 
beat Clarion 21-11 last year. The 
Titans entered last week's action 
as the number one ranked team 
in the NAIA, but lost 21-15 on 
Saturday to last year's NAIA 
champion and third ranked 
Findlay. 

"Westminster once again has 
an outstanding football team," 
Sobolewski said. "They are an 
extremely well coached football 
team that has established a great 
tradition. If you're going to beat 
a Westminster team, you have to 
go out and win it, because they 
don't beat themselves. We'll 
have to play an error free game 
to win." 

The Titans are led by 
quarterback Sean O'Shea, who 
has completed 28 of 46 for 382 
yards Uius far. 

His top receivers are ^gff- 

f ofraj^..?nAe^clepUons in"l993. 

The running game is solid with 

tailback Andy Blatt and fullback 

Matt Buggey accumulating 141 

and 109 yards respectively. 

Westminster, as usual, thrives 

on their defense. The "D" is 

averaging a stingy 96.5 passing 

yards allowed per game, while 
surrendering 206.5 on the 

ground. 

Clarion's "D" is allowing 

147.5 through the air and 235 on 

the ground. 

Kickoffissetfor 1 PM. 



Clarion 
New Haven 



8 15 -23 
14 « 14 7 -35 



First Quarter 
New Haven: Graham I run 
(ORiordan kick). Drive: 7 plays 71 
yards, 2:24. Key play: 32 yard run 
byGrabam. NH 7, Clarion 0, 
New Haven: Graham 19 pass fromis 
Weir (O'Riordan kick). Drive:! 
play, 19 yds, :09. Key play: 
Barbera recovers Henry fumble at 
CirPl9. NH 14, Clarion 0. 

Third Quarter 
New Haven: WillLs 15 pass from 
Weir (O'Riordan kick). Drive: 3 
plays, 66 yards, :57. Key play; 34 
yd run by Graham. NH 21, Clarion 

New Haven: Graham 1 run 
{O'Riordan kick). Drive. 4 plays, 59 
yards, 1:10. Key play: 52 yd run 
by Graham takes hall from NH 45 to 
CUP 2 NH 28, CUP 0. 
Clarion: Henry 7 run (Brown pass . 
from Zak). Drive 3 plays, 65 yards*' 
:53. Key play Worthy 49 yd pass 
from Zak. NH 2S, Clarion 8. - 

Fourth Quarter 
Clarion: Gregory 2 run (Cramer 
kick). Drive- 8 plays, 50 yards, 
2r27 Key play. Henr>' gams six on 
4lhand4. NH 28, CUP 15. 
New Haven: Graham 2 run 
(O'Riordan kick). Drive; 6 plays, 17 
yards, 2:58. Key Play: Punt hits 
Worthy, Nil recovers. NH 35, 
Clarion IS. 

Clarion: Quinn 2 pass from Zak 
(Quinn pass from Zak). Drive: 12 
plays. 63 yaixts. 1:17. Key Play: 
Zak to Quinn for 34 yds. NH 35, 
Clarion 23. 



Team Statistics 





NH 


CUP 


First Downs 


19 


19 


Rushing Yards 


277 


L43 


Passing Yards 


452 


398 


t%Js'Comp/Att 


16/28 


22/47 


Passes Had Int 





2 


Fumbles/ Lost 


3/2 


6/3 


Penal tiesA'ards 


1/10 


5/32 



Plaver Statistics 

Rushing- Clarion: Henry 21118. 

Gregory 9-33, Dejadis 3-20. Ray 

2-4, Zak 5-(-32). New Haven: 

Graham 21-223, Livingston 19-82, 

Weir7-(-28>. 

Passing- Clarion: Zak 17-36 for 

227, ITDandllNT. Ray 5-10 

for 28, I INT; Worthy 0- 1. New 

Haven: Weir 16-28 for 175 and 2 

TD's. 

Receiving- Chirlon: Biowii 8-64. 

Quinn 4-48. '.Vorihy 3-" 3, Henry 3- 

33. NewH;Hen: Willi, 3-52. 



Page 20 



The Clai-ion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 




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WOLKIMIR IS MODEL OF CONSISTENCY 

Eagles drop to 1 -5 



By Tondelaya Carey 
Sportswriter 



One year ago, the Clarion 
University tennis team was 4-1 
at this time in the year and 
coasting to another stellar 
season. 1993 is taking a 
different shape for the ELagles, as 
Clarion lost its third in a row on 
Monday and has now lost five 
of its last six. 

The Eagles fought long and 
hard at Mercyhurst but came up 
short, 6-3. Roxann Milton was 
responsible for two of Clarion's 
three points, winning her singles 
match 3-6, 6-2, 6-1, and then 
teaming with Sara Unkefer for a 
6-2, 7-6(8-6) doubles victory. 
Shara Wolkimir was the other 
Eagle winner with a brilliant 6-1, 
6-2 victory. 

Clarion next visited the 
powerful California Vulcans. 
The Eagles could manage only 
one point and suffered a brutal 
8-1 setback. The lone point was 
scored by the duo of Wolkimir 
and Melodi Dess who upped 
their season doubles mark to 3-1 . 

Clarion played in only its 
second home match of the 
season on Monday. The 
University of Pittsburgh was the 
opponent and a 6-3 loss was the 
result. Wolkimir destroyed her 
opponent 6-0, 6-0 while Unkefer 
quietly pulled away with a 0-6, 
6-3, 7-5 win. Wolkimir and Dess 
collected yet another doubles 
victory as they teamed for a 6-2, 



6-4 win. 

Wolkimir leads the Eagles with 
a 4-2 singles record, while 
Kristen McKinley and Sara 
Unkefer have accumulated 3-3 
slates for 1993. 

The Golden Eagles will take 
their 1-5 overall record into the 



first of five straight PSAC tills. 
Slippery Rock visited Clarion on 
Wednesday, and then the Eagles 
migrate for a three day road u:ip 
in which they will swoop upon 
Shippensburg, Edinboro and 
Indiana. The PSAC's will be 
held at Allentown, Oct. 14-16. 




Ray Henderson/ Clarion Call 
Hoping to bounce back: Sara Unkefer and the Golden Eagles 
will try to get back on the winning track Sunday at Shipp. 



Volleyball team loses ninth straight 

Eagles digging themselves a hole 



by Debbie Adams 
Sportswriter 



After playing ten consecutive 
road games, the Clarion 
University women's volleyball 
team finally had a chance to play 
in iiotvt ftf the home folk on 
Thursday. 

Robert Morris came to Tippin 
Gymnasium and the Colonials 
beat the Eagles three games to 
two. After losing the first two 
sets by scores of 2-15 and 14-16, 
the Eagles clawed back to win 
the Uiird set 15-6, then won the 
fourth, 16-14. An exciting fifth 
set had several lead changes, but 
in the end, it was the Colonials 
who prevailed, 15-11. 

Li.sa Flynn led the Eagles in 
digs with 16 and Beth Tress 



shoveled out five. Co-captain 
Meghan Kelly ended the day 
with 17 assists. 

On Tuesday, Clarion 
completed its extended two day 
homestand with a battle against 
Lock Haven. The Eagles 
dropped their ninUi su^aight with 
a7-15, 2-15, 7-15 .setback. 
Kaue Rhodes had 30 set assists 



and Lisa Flynn nailed eight 
service aces for Clarion. 
Meghan Kelly continued her fine 
work by collecting 31 digs. 

The Eagles will try to end their 
nine game slide at Mercyhurst on 
Friday. The next home game 
will be held on October 5 against 
lUP 



Intramural fosters for 

volleyball and soccer 

are due by 3:00 on 

Friday, Sept. 24 



The Clarion Call; Thursday, September 23, 199> ■ 



Pagc.2i 



Sports Spotlight 



After years of INT's, Adams picks baseball 



by Jon Q. Sitter 
Contributing writer 



During his two full seasons of 
football at Clarion University 
from 1989-91, Billy Adams 
amassed 95 tackles (59 solo), 
three interceptions, one sack, 
N-oke up 15 passes and caused a 
fumble as a comerback and free 
safety. He totaled 100 yards on 
punt returns and 386 yards on 21 
kick returns. 

During that same period of 
time in baseball, Adams 
collected ZERO home runs, 
ZERO runs batted in and 
ZERO steals in ZERO at bats. 
He didn't play college baseball. 

Now a trivia quesUon: Did 
Clarion graduate Bill Adams 
recently sign a professional 
contract with the Los Angeles 
Raiders or was it the Los 
Angeles Dodgers? 

The most obvious answer is, 
surprisingly, the wrong one. 

This 24-year-old left-handed 
outfielder, who lettered in only 
football and track at Clarion, was 
signed to play pro baseball by 
Dodger scout Lon Joyce (South 
(Molina) in June of 1993. 

Despite coming from a football 
oriented family, Adams wasn't 
supposed to become a successful 
football player, either. Even after 
gaining All-Conference 

recognition in football his senior 
year at Red Lion High School, 
people still told him that he was 
too small to play big-time 
football. It was obvious that 
Division I football programs 
would pass on this 135 pound, 
"dripping wet" high school 
graduate. However, telling Billy 
Adams that he couldn't 
accomplish something was a big 
mistake. 

Fresh out of high school and 
only thinking football, Adams 
played two years at Stevens Tech 
(Lancaster) and was looking to 
make an impression. 
It was here where Adams began 
to physically mature. An 
increase in size and experience 
opened Clarion's proverbial 
football eyes. 

But did this dedication to 
football almost make Adams 
miss his calling (baseball)? "1 
wouldn't say I regret [not 
playing college baseball], but if I 
had it to do over again, I would 
play," said Adams. "But I have 
to be happy about the situation, 
the way things have turned out." 
Following his graduation from 
Clarion with a degree in 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Bo don't know Billy: Former Clarion football standout Billy 
Adams will don the Dodger blue In 1994 after signing a 
minor league baseball contract in early June. 



Business Management, Adams 
moved to Nordi Carolina. It was 
here where he would soon be 
made aware of an Atlanta Braves 
tryout in Durham. "I was in the 
best shape of my life, so I said 
what the heck," explained 
Adams, who played baseball and 
football as well as wrestled in 
high school. 

Adams, who can run the forty 
yard dash in 4.4 seconds, noted 
that speed is his "main asset." 
His sixty yard dash to open the 
tryout paved the way. 

The Braves organization 
expressed great interest but was 
hesitant to sign a 24-year-old. 



Surprised by Uie interest, Adams 
seriously dedicated himself to 
the idea of playing 
professionally. After receiving 
more interest in his second and 
third tryouts, these with the 
Marlins and Cubs, along came 
the Dodgers. 

Following the successful tryout 
in Carolina, Uie Dodgers invited 
Adams to a second tryout in 
Vero Beach, Florida. They 
wanted to see his adjusunent to a 
wooden bat in a two-day affair. 
"When I heard that they had 
invited me to a second tryout, I 
hurried up and went to the cage," 
said Adams. "I had never used a 



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wooden bat before." 

This time, all eyes were on 
him. But, de.spite being nervous, 
he was satisfied with the second 
tryout. He would have been 
happy with any decision. 

The day after he got back to 
North Carolina, he got the call. 
Adams didn't hesitate to sign. 

When asked what his favorite 
sport was, Adams couldn't 
answer (even after just signing a 
pro contract in baseball). 
Football will always be a major 
interest in his life. As evidenced 
by the first day he came back to 
visit Clarion this fall. 

The first place he went was to 
Memorial Stadium to watch the 
Golden Eagles practice. He 
followed that up by catching a 
Clarion-Limestone high school 
football game that night. 

Realistically, Adams says that 
there is more of a future for him 
in baseball, or at least more of a 
present. After breaking his 
thumb during the 1990-91 
football season, he started 
thinking more about baseball. 
His focus on Golden Eagle 
football, however, kept him off 
of the diamond. 

For Adams, baseball and 
football comes second to his 
family, whose positive 
reinforcement played a part in 
forming his competitive frame of 
mind. 

He holds his father in hiuh 
regard for being the person who 
always made dreams look 
believable. Adams said that he 
always had someone setting 



gojils for him, whether it was his 
fjunily or coaches. "I'm always 
looking to go a step further," 
Adams said. "There's no way 
I'm .satisfied." 

Adcuns will be assigned to the 
Dodgers single A club in Vero 
Beach. He's already had about 
three weeks experience with the 
club (at the end of the 1993 
season) in a league known for 
pitching. He worked "hours upon 
hours" with the hitting insu^uctor. 
He was adjusting and learning 
through the whole experience. 
Improving every swing, Adams 
su^oked a three-run double and a 
three-run homer in his final few 
at baLs. 

That was last sea.son. "My goal 
for 1994 is to go to spring 
training in tip-top shape and 
make an impact from day one," 
said Adams. "My foot's already 
in the door and I'm on equal 
footing with everyone else." 

Adams ioins former Clarion 
pitcher Brad Frazier in pro 
baseball. Frazier was signed by 
the Florida Marlins in 1992. 

After spending his first 
professional season (1992) with 
the Marlins' short-season single 
A team in Erie, Frazier went 5-0 
against tougher competition in 
Kane County, 111. He was u.sed 
as a reliever in lefty versus lefty 
situations. 

"It was a good experience," 
said Frazier. "It was the longest 
period of time I've been away 
from home. I'll know more about 
my status with the Marlins for 
1994 come January." 




The Medicine Shoppe. 
What A Phamiacy Was Meant T) Be. 

\f.^hai A Pharmacy Wiis Mcam To Be' 



A pharmacy should be a 
place to get advice, help, 
and prescriptions. Not a 
discount store full of 
paperback novels, 
perfumes, and film. Tliat's 
why we stick to what we 
know in our store: 
medicine, answers, and 
friendly, helpful service. 
And why you'll never 
find us ttK> busy 
rearranging the lipstick 
di.splay to talk witli you. 



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any new or transferred pivscription at 
I The Medicine Shoppe (S) Pharmacy 
j *Liniil one per customer 
I *N(>l valid with anv cillicr offer < 



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Clarion (X14)22f> "MO 

M-F 9:30-5:30, S,,t 9:30-1 :(►.» 



Page 22 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Sports Commentary 

Undefeated Dawgs refusing to roll over and play dead 



by Jody Males 
Sportswriter 



Wow! Remember last week 
when I said I had chewed ipy 
fingernails off from ihe 
excitement? Well, I'm now 
down to the knuckles. Week 
three in the NFL was what 
football truly is; an exciting, 
fast-paced journey with an 
unknown ending that keeps the 
audience breathless. 

In Los Angeles, Eric Metcalf 
brought his Browns back from 
16-0 to win in the last six 
seconds, 19-16. In Philly, 
sharpshooter Randall 

Cunningham hit Gizmo Williams 
in the back of the endzone on the 
last play of the game to win an 
uncharacteristic NFC East 
shootout, 34-31 against the 
Skins. I thought they played 
defense in the NFC East! And 
how about those never-say-die 
Falcons, who just seemed to 
"hang in there" against the 49ers 
in another NFC West clash, 
finally bowing out at 37-30. 
Who says the NFL isn't fun? 

Hey, Modell's Browns seem to 
be for real. With Sunday's 
comeback, the Dawgs have 
proved they can win on the road 
and against quality teams like the 
Silver and Black. Cleveland is 



playing "NFC style" defense 
with Michael Dean Perry and 
Jerry Ball up front and LB's 
David Brandon and Mike 
Johnson in the middle. Who 
would have guessed that the 
Dawgs would start off 3-0, their 
best start since 1979? Not me. 
After Sunday's heroics, people 
might start referring to the 
Browns as "the Cardiac kids," a 
name the men of Cleveland 
inherited in the early 80's for 
their last second miracles. 

The NFC East seems to be 
back in form. Both the Giants 
and Eagles are carrying perfect 
records. Philadelphia earned 
theirs the hard way by rising 
from the depths of defeat widi a 
miraculous TO pass with four 
seconds left. Wide receiver 
Calvin "Gizmo" Williams 
snagged his third TD catch of the 
day from Randall Cunningham 
in a wild and whacky 34-31 
track meet at the Vet. Experts 
have said it many times. I'll 
restate it: The best football in 
the NFL is played in the NFC 
East. Hey folks, the last three 
Super Bowl Champs are from 
this division. 

How about the NFC West? 
Not bad either. The Saints are 
posting a 3-0 record, but the 
Niners are like a cobra, they can 



Catch the Eagles in action 

Football: at Westminster Sat. 1:00 

Volleyball: at Mercyhurst Fri. 7:30 

at California Tue. 7:30 

Tennis: at Shipp Sun. 3:00 

atEdinboro Wed. 3:00 

atlUP Thu. 3:00 

Golf: at Mercyhurst Tue. 3:00 

C-Country: at St. Bonaventure Sat. 



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strike quick and with deadly 
results. Just a.sk Jerry "1 bought 
tickets for Elvis" (ilanville, who 
watched with the "king" as the 
lights on the scpreboiird were lit 
up to their fullest. You could teiU 
that whoever had the ball last 
would win this track meet as 
Falcons' QB Bobby Hebert and 
the Niners' Steve Young 
combined for 6 touchdowns and 
over 300 yards passing. Young 
was even able to make some 
highlight reel material by 
throwing and catching his own 



pass! Trust me, you had to see it 
to believe it! Rea.son enough to 
be NFL MVP. 

In other notes around the 
league, San Diego kicker John 
Carney kicked away Morten 
Anderson's one week old record 
for consecutive field goals by 
nailing six against Houston, 
upping his total to 29 in a row 
and giving his Chargers a one 
point squeaker 

Seattle rookie QB Rick Mirer 
threw his first NFL TD pass 




against the \yinless Patriots, a 4 
yarder to wideout Brian Blades. 

And hey, we'^ve got to mention 
those Chiefs, who were also 
playing one fine defensive game! 
"The Sackman" Dprrick Thomas, 
and a tenacious pass rush kept 
John "the Duke" Elway in check 
in a hype filled Monday night 
clash. The NFL's most accurate 
kicker, Nick Lowery, booted 5 
field goals to lift Kansas City to 
a 15-7 victory. Mr. Montana 
made his home debut Und was 
rudely shutout by an impressive 
Denver defense which didn't 
allow Joe a TD pass. 

Finally, and probably the 
happiest news in western 
Pennsylvania, was the Steelers' 
offense, which finally came out 
of the cave, and racked up 404 
yards as Cowher Power finally 
discovered where that mythical 
"0" was hiding. Time will only 
tell just how long the "0" will 
stay discovered, as the black and 
gold head to the Georgia Dome 
for a Monday Night matchup 
against Glanville^s Falcons. 
Wouldn't it be nice to make 
reservations at the Georgia 
Dome for January 30, 1994? Ah 
yes, it's fun to daydream in 
class., isn't it? 



I courtesy of Corry Journal 
Still perfect: Phil Simms and the New York Giants are one of only 
four 3-0 teams in the NFL. The last time the G-Men were 3-0 at 
this stage was 1990, when New York won the Super Bowl. 



Sunday's games 
Mia at Buff Pho at Det 

Rams at Hou S.F. at N.O. 

G.B. at Minn Sea at On 

T.B. at Chi N.E. at Jets 

Cle at Ind 

Moridav's pame 
Pittsbuf^h at Atlanta 



Fiscus shoots 71 at Slippery Rock 



by Nathan Kahl 
Sportswriter 



On Monday, September 20, 
the Golden Eagle golf team 
finished up the Hal Hansen 
Memorial tournament at 
Treasure Lake Country Club in 
Dubois, PA. 

In a field of 11 teams, the 
Clarion "Blue" team finished 
fifth overall with a 667 and the 



Clarion "Gold" team placed 
seventh, shooting a 686. On a 
course that golfer Brian Fiscus 
described as, "really hard and 
really tight," Andy Ganoe temped 
the Clarion field with a two-day 
total of 162, good for eighth 
overall. The next best Clarion 
golfer was Chris Brosius, who 
finished 15th with 165. 

Earlier, the Golden Eagles 
u-avelled to the Slippery Rock 



InvitaUonal. The Blue team 
shot a 318 for ninth place, and 
the Gold team placed 12th out of 
14 with 327. 

Fiscus, who described this 
course as "much easier than 
Dubois," had an outstanding day, 
shooting a 71. This earned him 
the runner-up medal. 

The Eagles, yet to capture a 
first this year, will be at the 
Edinboro Invitational Thursday. 



„5th Ave. 
Restaurant 

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Best prices in town! 

226-8512 



ALL DAY SPECIALS 

Monday 

Draft Specials & 10c Wings 

Tuesday 

Bucket-b-Bud / Hot dogs (3 for $1 .00) 

Wednesday 

Nacho's with cheese for $3.00 
& Draft Specials 



The (Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



Page23 



Classifieds 



Help Wanted 



Help Wanted: Looking for a 
great opportunity with unlimited 
learning potential? Northeast 
Telecom is looking for 
aggressive self-motivated 
individuals to distribute Campus 
Talk calling card applications. If 
you're interested, call 1-800-800- 
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Fine lines and coverups. Choose 
from 50 colors. Located in Sligo, 
PA, 10 miles south of Clarion. 
Call for appointments after 5:00 . 
p.m. 358-2715. 

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Order your favorite titles at a 
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after 6 p.m. for information. 
For Sale: used furniture. Sofa, 
two chairs, coffee table. $40. 
782-3930 

For Sale: Late model green 
Buick Regal. Buyer must assume 
responsibility for all unpaid 
parking tickets. Call Ben at the 
Clarion Call. 

Appearing live Friday 8 p.m. - 
Dancing Linda at the Sig Ep 
house. Tickets $4. 221-Om 



Rooms and Rent 



Available inunediately: 
2 bedroom mobile home in 
Clarion. Cheap rent. Contact 
Linda: 227-2784. 

Available second semester 
Nice mobile home in Clarion for 
three people. Contact Linda: 

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FOR RENT SPRING: 2 
bedroom furnished apartment 
near campus . 226-061 3 . 

Roonmiate needed immediately. 
$500 fall. $695 spring. ^^ 
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Anyone wanting to move back 
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Female needed. Call 
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rersonais 



Thela Chi, thanks tor the great 
mixer. Wc had a blast! Love, Phi 
Sigma Sigma. 

RUSH THETA CHI!!! 

Bar-B-Q & Volleyball - Sunday 
at 5 p.m. The ORIGINAL 
Casino Night - Tuesday at 7 p.m. 
Join the strongest fraternal 
brotherhood. Call the house at 
226-9956 (Ask for Jim 
Steinbeck) or stop at 703 Wood 
St. for more info. 

Phi Sigma Sigma, Thanks for 
coming to our groovy mixer, The 
brothers of Theta Chi. 



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Christine and Amy, You're doing 
a great job - keep up the good 
work. Love, your future D-Phi-E 
sisters. 

Sig Ep brothers. We had a blast, 
a really nice time - 1 hope you'll 
forgive me for this corny rhyme. 
Love, D-Phi-E. 

Angela and Sharla, Great job 
with rush. You guys are the 
greatest. Thanks. Love, your D- 
Phi-E sisters. 

Congratulations Julie and Luis 
on your engagement. Love, your 
D-Phi-E sisters. 

Phi Sigma Sigma, Had a great 
time at the beach. Hope we can 
jump in the pool together again 
real soon! Sorry for being so 
late. Love, the brothers of Theta 
XL 

All women are welcome to the 
Alpha Sigma Tau Open Bid 
Party on Monday, Sept. 27, 9-10 
p.m. at the Tau House. If you 
need a ride, please meet at 
Carlson at 8:50 p.m. See you 
there! 

Pat C, Happy 21st birthday, 
baby! Now we can finally go to 
the bars together. I love you, 
Michelle 

To the sisters of Delta Zeta, You 
girls look GREAT in sheets! We 
had a great time at the toga 
mixer. Let's do it again real soon. 
Brothers of Phi Sigma Kappa. 

The brothers of Phi Sigma 
Kappa would like to wish all the 
greeks good luck in fall rush. 

The sisters of Alpha Sigma 
Alpha would like to wish 
everyone the best of luck 
through rush. 

Advertise in the Clarion Call 
classifieds. 10 words only $1.00. 
Another 5 words add $0.50. 



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Happy birthday to Carrie 
Lengauer and Lisa Morrison 
who celebrated their birthdays 
this month. We love you both. 
Love, your sisters of Alpha 
Sigma Alpha. 

To the brothers of Phi Sigma 
Kappa, We did it better than the 
"Greeks" ever could. We'll To};a 
with you anytime. It was a blast! 
Thanks. Love, the sisters of 
Delta Zeta. 

Tina, congratulations on getting 
pinned. Love, your Delta Zeta 
sisters. 

Dawn, Happy belated birthday. 
Only one more year 'til the big 
one. Love, your Delta Zeta 
sisters. 

Brigitte, Thank you for making 
rush such a great success. You 
did a wonderful job! Love, your 
Delta Zeta sisters. 

Whendy, Congratulations on 
your engagement. We're so 
happy for you! With all our love, 
your sisters of Alpha Sigma Taii; 

To you know who: Thanks for 
the crazy night of twister. We 
had a blast! Love, the sisters of 

AST 

The sisters of AST wish 
everyone a tun and successful 
rush. 

A special thanks tc all of the 
beautiful women that helped 
Sigma Chi with our HOT LEGS 
rush party. I only wish rush 
lasted all year LONG! Love, 
Adam E. PS. Nice legs Fabian. 

Happy Birthday to our 
September Theta Phi Alphas: 
Steph (Happy 21st), Amy W, and 
Mellony. 

Theta Phi Alpha congratulates 
our newly engaged sisters: 
Marcie G., Jerri Lynn, Karin, and 
AmvG. 



Spring Break '94! 

Campus Reps Needt'f! 

• CANCUN • -^ 

• BAHAMAS • 

• JAMAICA • 

• SOUTH PADRE ISLAND • 

• PANAMA CITV BCACH • 
• DAYTONA BFACH • 

• KEY WEST • 

Travel free aiKlFiHn Commissions 
BREAKAWAY TOURS INC 

1-800-214-8687 



Theta Phi Alpha congratulates 
all the new associate members 
and wishes them good luck 
during pledging. 

Hey Theta Xi! It was .small, wc 
still had a ball. Left foot blue, we 
always have a great time with 
you. You guys know how to 
"twist." Love, the sisters of 
Theta Phi Alpha. 

Dana, You and Janine did 
another excellent job during 
rush. We love you guys! Love, 
your Theta Phi Alpha sisters. 

Hey Sigma Chi, What a way to 
die. Thanks for clueing us in. 
We'll play again real soon. Love, 

Tri Sigma. 

Sigma Chi Jason Delp, Thanks 
for being such a great 
sweetheart. What a crazy year! 
Love, Tri Sigma. 

You got it together We had the 
best weather. Partying all night. 
Oh, what a sight! Nikki, thanks 
for getting the Case Race 
together! Love, Tri Sigma. 

Jenn Pomaybo and the Sigma 
Sigma Sigma rush committee. 
You guys did an awesome job 
forfair93!! Weloveyou! 



Announcements 



Presentation by Jan Grigsby on 
"Now that I'm here, how can 1 
deal with STRESS!?!?!" When: 
Tuesday, Sept. 28th, 7 p.m. 
Where: 250 Gemmell 

Discarded jewelry needed by a 
friend who gives it to soup 
kitchen patrons. Please help. Dr 
Huber, English Dept. 

Men's floor hockey league now 
forming. You form your own 
team, you get your own spon.sor! 
Play Sunday afternoons. Call 
McDonalds at 226-4072 for an 
information package. 



Clarion Call 
Classifieds 

Put ONE IN 

AND LET 

THEM WORK 

FOR you! 



Page 24 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 23, 1993 



I iu- t jUTMh 



Breindel and Stecklair lead way 

Cross Country squad making great strides 



^V lien Vessa 
Sports Editor 



Capiiiins Megan Stecklair and 
Russ Breindel have led the 
Clarion University cross-country 
team to three impressive 
performances in 1993, and 
rumors ot a trip to Massachusetts 
and jui appearance at Regionals 



are silling itfound the clubhouse. 
I'or Clarion to advance to 
Regionals, the Eagles must finish 
in the top five out of all PS AC 
schools. 

"This is the best girl's team 
we've had at Clarion in a long 
time," stated Stecklair, "We have 
great team unity and <ire working 
on all running together." 



Stecklair is joined by returners 
Lisa Griffo, Jen Gleason, .len 
Dansberger, Lynn Baluh and 
Brandee Payne, and by 
newcomers Lisa Benlock and 
Kara Schwotzer who add a lot of 
depth and ability to the team 
according to Stecklair. 

On Saturday, the Eagles 
competed in the lUP Invitational 




FOUR 

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Thurs 11 AM- 1AM 
Fri-Sat 11AM-2AM 



327 W. MAIN ST. CLARION, PA 

September Special 

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plus tax 



$1.80/topping covers both pizzas 



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and finished the 3.2 mile course 
in impressive style. Griffo 
finished 25th out of 100 runners 
with Stecklair coming in 37lh. 

The men were led by Chad 
Briggs who finished 51st out of 
130 and Scott Reffner who was 
the 53rd to cross the end line. 

The women finished 8th and 
the men placed 11th out of 



twelve schools. 

The Golden Eagles will next 
be in action Saturday, September 
25 at Geneva College. The 
Eagles will host the Alumni meet 
on October 9. 

The PS AC championships are 
scheduled for October 30 at 
Bloomsburg. 



IN THE BLEACHERS 

by Steve Moore 



f^t^ 



'^>1993 Tribune Media Services, inc 
Al) Rights Reserved 



'^■tS 




if 1^ on? (Juartw Pounder'wft ftwsf Sandvwdi 
I OT ONE FREE 



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Good on\f at II 

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Phone (814) 226-9122 






^imM^^a 



Volume 74, Issue 4 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 30, 1993 

Do SAT scores accurately predict 
collegiate academic success? 



itff,- i F i fr a '^ i — »*t M I'tt' H t HI 1 1 m I J li tw Ifc H M l 1 1 M 1 1 H ■ 1 1' '» " I' ' i*^ W * iT i i -; 



News 



Sexual Assault 

Wliat it is, what to do. . . pg. 5 j 



Lifestyles 

History of ALF 

The annual event spans foi!r| 
aeca^ pg. 11 



Sports 



B^WIn 

Eagles steal onclrom West- 
Siii^ter. pg- 19] 



Cterion's 

^^fieather Oatlooki 

Parfiy sunny, 
HigU: 53 
PSffiy doudy, 
High:58 
Sunny 
High: 58 
Showers, 
High:60 
Overcast 
High: 62 
Partly Sunny 
High: 60 
Sunny 
High: 61 



Index 



CMnnKntary pg. 2 

News pg. 5 

TV Guide PB ^ 

Lifestyle pg- U 

jMJF events sctKidule. . pg. 141 

Entertaiiment pg- 16J 

Sports pg- 1^1 

idassifieds pg- 23] 



by Alan Vaughn 
Managing Editor 



The Scholastic Aptitude Test 
has been officially renamed the 
Scholastic Assessment Test, 
beginning this year, and has 
undergone other changes in form 
and content. 

But are the name change and 
the related testing changes 
significant, or are they really just 
semantics? So far, the verdict is 
still out. 

"The new name for the SAT 
sends a clear message to this 
[nation's] diverse group of 
students that the test is 
measuring their knowledge and 
skills, not something innate," 
said Dolores Cross, president of 
Chicago State University and a 
trustee of the College Board. 

The first use of the new SAT 
will take place on March 19, 

"The new SAT 
is repackaging. 
It's putting tail 
Hns on the 
Eds el. " 



fii 



1994, and the initial version of 
the PSAT, the shorter version 
given to high school juniors and 
sophomores, will be 
administered on Oct. 12 and 16, 
1993. 

The revised test will place 
more emphasis upon reading and 
writing skills and require 
students to answer open-ended 
math questions. 

According to the College 
Board, scores on the new tes; 
should be similar to those from 
the old test. 

"It's hard to say what [the new 
test] will mean," said John 
Shropshire, director of 
admissions for Clarion 
University. "The next couple of 



years will be big question 
marks." 

"In time, high schools and 
colleges will adjust," said 
Shropshire. "It's hard to say 
what colleges or Clarion 
University will do until we have 
a test run." 

Some civil rights and 



minority group girls and boys 
from educational opportunities," 
said Dr. Beverly Cole, education 
director for the NAACP 

The old test is biased, said 
Shropshire, in that it is skewed 
toward the math and sciences, in 
which a higher percentage of 
boys enroll than girls. If girls 



600 



Q Female 
■ Male 



1992 Ettmlc/Gtnder SAT Scores 

V -Verbal 
M -Math 




V M 

White 



V M 
Asian-Am. 



i Seuroa: Cwitar lor Fair and OpMi TMttng 



V M V M V M 

Alrican-Am. Mexican-Am. Native-Am. 

National Student Nawt SarvlcA , 



Standardized testing watchdog 
groups claim the changes are 
nothing more than a gloss 
coating to a product in need of 
repair. 
"The new SAT is repackaging," 
said Bob Schaeffer, director of 
the National Center few Fair and 
Open Testing (FairTest). "It's 
putting tail fins on the Edsel." 

One analysis by FairTest said 
that 71% of the verbal test and 
83% of the math test will remain 
essentially as is. 

In a recent publication, the 
College Board admitted that, 
"the new SAT and the current 
SAT have more similarities than 
differences." 

"Instead of dealing with the 
SAT's serious flaws — its biases, 
inaccuracy, coachability and 
irrelevance to sound college 
admissions practices — the 
College Board has decided to 
make minor changes and give it 
a new name," said Schaeffer. 

"Standardized tests have been 
used to exclu(k low-income and 



took the same courses as boys, 
the scores would balance. "Fact 
is, girls actually have higher 
grades, "Shropshire said. 

The test is more a reflection of 
the courses the student took 
throughout high school than a 
reflection of any innate ability, 
said Shropshire. Large suburban 
schools that have a large number 
of honors and advanced 
placement courses to offer, will 



have students with a better 
background to take the test. 
Rural and urban schools that 
cannot offer those courses to 
their students will fare worse on 
the test, he said. 

But, said Shropshire, "It's all 
tied to the curriculum. The new 
set-up most likely will not 
change that. If [students] don't 
have the background, they won't 
do any better on the new [test] 
than the old." 

The College board agrees. 
"The trustees (of the College 
Board) wished to correct the 
impression among some people 
that the SAT measures 
something innate and 
impervious to change regardless 
of effort or instruction," said 
Donald M. Stewart, president of 
the College Board. "We wanted 
to emphasize more clearly that 
the SAT measures verbal and 
mathematical skills that are 
developed over time both in and 
out of school." 

According to 1993 statistics 
from the College Board, 
suburban high school mean SAT 
scores topped rural schools by 62 
poinis and urban schools by 59 
points. 32% of all SAT takers 
come from suburban high 
schools, 12% from rural schools 
and 23% from urban schools. 

What this means, Shropshire 
said, is that generally suburban 



Continued on Page 3 

Two thefts reported in Clarion 



The Clarion Borough Police 
are investigating a burglary at 
High Gear Bike Shop, 34 South 
5th Avenue in Clarion. 
According to a police report, the 
burglary occurred in the early 
morning hours on Sunday. The 
burglars gained access through a 
second story construction area. 3 
Cannondale bicycles, numerous 
Oakley sunglasses, clothing, 
boots, tents and back packs were 
taken. The value of the stolen 



items is estimated at $6,690.36. 

Also, the Clarion borough 
Police are investigating a theft 
from a wallet lost in the Dollar 
General Store at 609 Main 
Street. Shirley Clever of 
Marienville lost her wallet at 
1 1:20 a.m. on Tuesday. 
When she found the wallet 20 
minutes later, $60 in cash had 
been removed from the wallet. 
At the time, the store was 
crowded. 



CeleSratina over 70 years as a student neiuspape. 



9 



A 



l\i<ie 24 



Ihe ( larlon (all: Ihiirsdav, September 23, 1993 



lireiiidel and Stecklair lead way 



Cross Country squad making great strides 



hy Ihn Vessa 
Sports Editor 



Capiains Mcg;ui Stecklair and 
Riiss Biciiulcl have led llic 
Clarion University cross-country 
team to three impressive 
pcrlorniances in 19^)3. and 
minors ot a trip to Massachusetts 
and an appearance at Reeionals 



are siltini: around the clubhouse, 
lor Clarion to advance to 
Kenionals, the l-ai:les must linish 
in the top live out ot all PSAC 
schools. 

"This is the best girl's team 
we've had at Clarion in a long 
time." stated Stecklair, "We have 
great team unity and are working 
on all runniui: toi:eiher." 



Stecklair is joined by returners 
Lisa CirilTo, Jen (ileason, Jen 
Dansberger. Lynn Baluh and 
Brandee Payne, and by 
newcomers Lisa Benlock and 
Kiua Sehwoi/er who add a lot of 
depth and ability to the team 
according to Sleckhiir, 

On Saturday, the l:agles 
competed in the lUP Invitational 







FOUR 
SUR 



^X^,nn« 



*•*• 



226-8881 



Sun-Wed 11AM-Midnight 
Thurs 11AM-1AM 
Fri-Sat1lAM-2AM 



327 W. MAIN ST. CLARION, PA 

September Special 

Two 1 2" Cheese Pizza 



Only $7.99 



plus tax 



$1 .80/topping covers both pizzas 



I FOUR Dinner 
I TOR LJinnt^f 

j m^ for two 

Only $6.00 



I 
I 

I Plus TAX 

I Includes 12' one-item pizza 

I plus 2 cups ot Pepsi 

I ■■.'p-j delive'v a-eaonly Expifes9%'93 

I 



FOUR 
STftR 

PtllA 

arc 



Sub 
for two 



Only $4.50 

PLUS TAX 

Includes BIG 12" SUB plus 
2 cups of Pepsi 

limited delivery area only E xpires a'30/93 



jwR Dinner 
e™ for four 

ore 

Only $8.25 

PLUS TAX 

Includes 16" one-item pizza 
plus 4 cups of Pepsi 

limited delivery iiea only Expires 9 30/93 



and linished Uie 3.2 mile course 
in impressive style, (iritfo 
finished 2.Sih out ot KM) runners 
with Stecklair coming in .37th. 

The men were led by Chad 
Briiius who iini.shcd .'^Ist out of 
130 and Scott Reffner who was 
the .'^3rd to cro.ss the end line. 

The women tinished 8th and 
the men placed 11th out ot 



twelve schools. 

The Ciolden liagles will next 
be in action Saturday. September 
2.'> at Cicneva College. Ihe 
l-agles will host the Alumni meet 
on October 9. 

The 1*SAC championships ju-e 
scheduled for October 30 at 
BkxHTisburg. 



IN THE BLEACHERS 

by Steve Moore 




II 
II 

11 
11 
II 
li 
il 
It 
11 
II 



Buy om Quarter Pounder" with Cheese Sandwich 
dETONEFRK 



t%r, v^i^it i ' *\i oi 1 1 *n-< 



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jjHuhc? vnw- U'-x' 1 mut one hxxi 



Valid until 10-2-93 






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Clarion & Brookvflie McDonald's || 

>«•<«' *;} 992 McDonald'* Corpofaliott i| 





Qood only a) 



—^ Stehle's — -— -~ 

Mini-storage 

^ iniics troin CUP - ln(er>>cciu>n 322 ^ 66 
Shippcnvillc, PA 16254 

5'x7'space - $26.50 per month 
5'xlO' space - $31,80 per month 

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^tSp* ^.11^0^ t&aWmii ■ • .i-f»*i* 



Volume 74, Issue 4 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania September 30, 1993 




In 
This 



JLiSligiyil^ 

News 



«fi 



Sexual Assault 

What it is, what to do. . . pg. 5 



t Lifestyles 

History of ALF 

'The annual event spans four 
decades pg. 11 



Sports 



wi 



Big Win 

Eagles steal one from West- 
minister. pg- 19 



I Clarion's 

I Weather Outlook 



Thursday: 

iFriday: 

\ 

i 

{Saturday: 

I 
Sunday: 

Monday: 

IXiesday: 

Wednesday: 



Partly sunny. 
High: 53 
Partly cloudy, 
High:58 
Sunny 
High: 58 
Showers, 
High:60 
Overcast 
High: 62 
Partly Sunny 
High: 60 
Sunny 
High: 61 



Index 



Commentary pg. 2 

News pg. 5 * 

TV Guide Pg- 10 S 

Lifestyle pg- H 8 

ALF events schedule. . pg. 14 

Entertainment Pg- 16 

SpcMts pg 19 

Classifieds pg. 23^ 




Do SAT scores accurately predict 
collegiate academic success? 



by Alan Vaughn 
Managing Editor 



The Scholastic Aptitude Test 
has been officially renamed the 
Scholastic Assessment Test, 
beginning this year, and has 
undergone otJher changes in form 
and content. 

But are the name change and 
the related testing changes 
significant, or are they really just 
semantics? So far, the verdict is 
still out. 

"The new name for the SAT 
sends a clear message to this 
[nation's] diverse group of 
students that the test is 
measuring their knowledge and 
skills, not something innate," 
said Dolores Cross, president of 
Chicago State University and a 
Uaistee of the College Board. 

The first use of the new SAT 
will take place on March 19, 

"The new SAT 
is repackaging. 
It's putting tail 
Ins on the 
Edsel. " 



fi^ 



1994, and the initial version of 
the PS AT, the shorter version 
given to high school juniors and 
sophomores, will be 
administered on Oct. 12 and 16, 
1993. 

The revised test will place 
more emphasis upon reading and 
writing skills and require 
students to answer open-ended 
math questions. 

According to the College 
Board, scores on the new test 
should be similar to those from 
the old lest. 

"It's hard to say what [the new 
test] will mean," said John 
Shropshire, director of 
admissions for Clarion 
University. "The next couple of 



years will be big question 
marks." 

"In time, high schools and 
colleges will adjust," said 
Shropshire. "It's hard to say 
what colleges or Clarion 
University will do until we have 
a test run." 

Some civil rights and 



minority group girls and boys 
from educafional opportunities," 
said Dr. Beverly Cole, education 
director for the NAACP 

The old test is bia.sed, said 
Shropshire, in diat it is skewed 
toward the math and sciences, in 
which a higher percentage of 
boys enroll than girls. If girls 




V M 
White 



V M 
Asian- Am. 



Souroa: Cwitar lor Filr and Opwi TMllng 



Standardized testing watchdog 
groups claim the changes are 
nothing more than a gloss 
coating to a product in need of 
repair. 
"The new SAT is repackaging," 
said Bob Schaeffer, director of 
the National Center for Fa«r and 
Open Testing (FairTest). "It's 
putting tail fins on the Edsel." 

One analysis by FairTest said 
that 71^f of die verbal test and 
83% of the math test will remain 
essentially as is. 

In a recent publication, the 
College Board admitted that, 
"the new SAT and the current 
SAT have more similarities than 
differences." 

"Instead of dealing widi the 
SAT's serious flaws — its biases, 
inaccuracy, coachability and 
irrelevance to sound college 
admissions practices — the 
College Board has decided to 
make minor changes and give it 
a new name," said Schaeffer. 

"Standardized tests have been 
used to exclude low-income and 



V M V M V M 

AJrican-Am Mexican-Am Native-Am 



National Student News S«rvtc« 

took the same courses as boys, 
the scores would balance. "Fact 
is, girls actually have higher 
grades, "Shropshire said. 

The lest is more a reflecdon of 
the courses the student took 
throughout high school than a 
reflection of any innate ability, 
said Shropshire. Large suburban 
schools diat have a large number 
of honors and advanced 
placement courses to offer, will 



have students with a better 
background to take the lest. 
Rural and urban schools that 
cannot offer those courses to 
dieir students will tare wor.sc on 
die lest, he said. 

But, .said Shropshire, "It's id! 
tied to die curriculum. Ihe new 
set-up most likely will not 
change that. If Istudents] don't 
have the background, they won't 
do any better on the new [tesi] 
dian die old." 

The College board agrees. 
"The trustees (of the College 
Board) wished to correct the 
impression among some people 
that the SAT measures 
something innate and 
impervious to change regardless 
of effort or instruction," said 
Donald M. Stewart, president of 
die College Bojird. "We wanted 
to emphasize more clearly that 
the SAT measures verbal and 
mathematical skills that are 
developed over time bodi in and 
out of .school." 

According to 1993 statistics 
from the College Board, 
suburbiin high school mean SAT 
scores topped rural .schtxils by 62 
poinis and urban schools by 59 
points. 32% of all SAT takers 
come from suburban high 
sch'Ools, \l^c from rural schcxils 
and 23% from urban sch(X)ls. 

What this means, Shropshire 
said, is Uial generally suburban 



Continued on Page 3 

Two thefts reported in Clarion 



The Clarion Borough Police 
are investigating a burglary at 
High Geju- Bike Shop, 34 South 
5th Avenue in Clarion. 
According to a police report, die 
burglary occurred in the early 
morning hours on Sunday. The 
burglars gained access through a 
second story consU"uction area. 3 
Cannondide bicycles, numerous 
Oakley sunglasses, clothing, 
b(x)is, tents and back packs were 
taken. The value of the stolen 



items is esUmated at $6,690.36. 

Also, the Clarion borough 
Police are investigating a Ihefl 
from a wallet lost in the Dollar 
General Store at 609 Main 
Street. Shirley Clever of 
Marienville lost her wallet at 
1 1:20 a.m. on Tuesday. 
When she found die wallet 20 
minutes later, S60 in cash had 
been removed from the wallet. 
At the lime, the store was 
crowded. 



Page 2 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



Page 3 



Opinion 



The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chjef 

Alan Vaughn 

Managing Editor 

Rodney Sherman 

News Editor 

Amy Gerkin 

Lifestyle Editor 

Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 
Ray Henderson 
Photography Editor 
Samantha White 
Ad Design 
Chris Clouse 
Advertising Manager 
Brigitte Josefczyk 
Circulation Editor 

& Interim 

Business Manager 

Hans Dovenspike 

Copy/Design Editor 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 12:00 p.m. on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 
advertising revenue. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 2380 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch. ..$5 .50 

Classined Ads...$1.00 for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $.50 

Subscriptions 

Semester.. .$7.00 

Academic Year...$10.00 

The Clarion 
CaU is 

printed on 

recycled 

newsprint 



\^ 




The way I see it 



/y^.r^ 



T 



Copy and Design 1£ditor 



\nEAi 



*^U- 



of the '90s 

RINGGGGG. ....RINGGGGG.... 

"Hello" 

"Mister Sherman?" 

"Yes." 

"Hello, Mister Sherman, this is 
John Fleecem, of Fleecem and 
Skiptown Publishers. We were 
just looking over your 
manuscript for a new printing of 
'Little Red Riding Hood' and we 
need to clear up a few things 
here and there. You know, a 
couple of minor changes." 

"Well thanks Mister Fleecem, I 
wrote out the story because I 
couldn't find a version of it at 
the bookstore. I wanted a copy 
for my niece. I thought there 
might be other people out there 
who would be interest-" 

"That's great Rodney. May I 
call you Rodney? Great. There's 
just a few problems we should 
fix. You know, to make it... 
Acceptable under today's 
standards." 

"You mean politically 
correct?" 

"You're a heterosexual white 
male aren't you, Mister 
Sherman? We can tell by your 
bias and unsensitive manuscript. 
But look, we just want to make 
the story something that won't 
offend anyone. We'll touch it up 
and then run it past the new 
liberal NEA board and Hillary 
and Bill's social engineering 
conmiission and then get back to 
you." 

"I don't know, I kind of like 
the story the way-" 

"It's just a few minor word 
choices Mister Sherman, of 
course we will have to give the 
little girl a name. To judge and 
nick-name a person because of 
the clothes they wear could give 
the kid a complex. We don't 
need the child psychiatrists on 
our backs. How about Jen?" 



Rodney Sherman 

"Jen?" 

"Yeah it's a very popular name 
right now in schools. Half the 
young girls in America are 
named Jen." 

"IkindofUke-" 
"Great, now Rodney, may I 
call you Rodney? Great. Now 
you have Jen being sent to her 
grandmother's house by her 
mother. We'll have to fix that. 
Jen's mother really should be a 
new age working, oops, I mean 
new age career woman. We'll 
have Jen slip away from her 
government provided day care 
worker." 

(Cont. on page 4) 



There is an ever-increasing 
phenomenon plaguing college 
students today. It is the [M'oblem 
of Common Sense Deprivation 
Disorder(CSDD). CSDD is the 
inability to take learned 
knowledge and apply it to real 
life situations. 

This university is comprised of 
close to 6,000 highly 
knowledgeable students. The 
problem, however, is that few 
have the common sensical ability 
to use their learnings outside of 
the classroom. Knowledge is 
gained through the learning of 
facts, theories, and 

introspection — among other 
ways (ask someone in the 
Philosophy or Psychology 
departments). 

The lack of common sense is 
what gives students a bad name. 
Conmion sense is the application 
of the above knowledge to daily 
occurances such as woridng at a 
job, making decisions, shopping, 
dining, and conversing with 
others. Much of the common 
sense wisdom that we need is 
gained at home from birth until 
high school graduation, but it is 
seemingly lost after the first 
semester away at college. 

The following are examples of 
CSDD: 

1 . Groups of 4 or 5 people 
congregating in front of a 
doorway into a building — just 



chatting. 

2. In fast food restaurants, 
persons c(xne right to the counter 
and take five minutes to decide 
what they want while a line of 
ten people wait behind them. 

3. After listening and taking 
notes for 45 minutes, a student 
asks, "Is this going to be on the 
test?" 

The above situations are very 
trivial and simplistic. There are 
definitely more serious ones. I 
do not know the reasons for 
CSDD, perhaps the results of 
being alone for the first time, but 
I do think college could be used 
to better prepare students. 

Courses could be offered such 
as "Life Applications" to set up 
scenarios for the students to 
solve the best outcome. Some 
instructors do give us some help 
in applying knowledge through 
essay questions and group 
exercises, but these only work 
for the field in which we are 
entering. 

I am certainly not one to talk 
when it comes to common sense, 
I have made my share of 
mistakes--my college career 
would probaly have been about 
three years shorter otherwise— 
but I have learned from them and 
hopefully grown along with the 
learning process. 

Have an enjoyable week ahead 
and use your heads. 



SIGNE 

PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS 

PtiJIadelphia 
USA 




D'StribulM by Tribune Madia Servicas 



Are the SATs. . . 



(cont. from pg. 1) 



schools can afford to offer the 
advanced courses that promote 
better scores on the test. Rural 
and urban schools often are not 
able to pn-ovide the same variety 
in courses. 

According to the College 
Board, SAT scores were lower 
than the national average in 
urban and rural areas "where the 
percentages of students with 20 
or more year-long academic 
courses were smaller than the 
percentage in suburban areas." 
In the same areas, the scores of 
students with the same amount 
of academic courses were 
comparable to those in suburban 
areas. 

"In general, the higher the 
percentage of students taking the 
test, the lower the average 
scores," said a statement about 



cautions on the use of aggregated 
SAT scores by the College 
Board. 

In states where a very small 
percentage of high school 
seniors take the test, generally 
only the students with strong 
academic backgrounds intending 
to enter selective colleges or 
scholarship programs take the 
test, thereby elevating the 
average score. 

"The scores continue to mirror 
the socioeconimic split between 
the well-educated of all races 
and the rest of society," Stewart 
said. 

Current high school students, 
though, may take the test more 
as a matter of ritual than for any 
benefit they feel they can glean 
from its content. 

"I figure I have to take 



them," said junior Erin Weiland, 
at Butler Senior High School in 
BuUer, PA. 

"1 don't like [the SAT]. There is 
too much emphasis on one test," 
said Jennifer Vaughn, a senior 
also at Butler Senior High 
School. "I don't see how 
colleges can base your whole 
career on how you do one 
morning." 

Senior Patrick Blaine of 
Slippery Rock High School, 
Slippery Rock, PA, said, "I don't 
think there's too much 
[emphasis] placed on it. There 
could be less, but it's just about 
right." 

"The SAT helps to measure 
intelligence," said Senior Adam 
Ketler, of Grove City High 
School, Grove City, PA. "[But] 
even then it's not great. It'll 



show someone who's a complete 
idiot, [but] you don't take just 
one big test to get through 
college." 

The SAT is only one of several 
components the admissions 
department considers when 
admitting a student, said 
Shropshire. Also considered are 
class rank, grade point average, 
profile of the high school and 
recommendations. 

"The SAT is such a barometer. 
It gets so much publicity that 
people think it's such a great 
forecaster," sakl Shropshire. "It's 
not a test that tests your ability to 
do college work. It never tested 
motivation." 

At present, there are more than 
100 college and universities in 
the U.S. that do not require 
admissions tests, including the 



California Stale Universities and 
Harvard Business School. 
"There is an overemphasis on the 
SATs in many areas," said Janet 
A. Lavin, associate director of 
admissions at Bowdoin College, 
which made the SAT optional in 
1989. 

Research at the University of 
Pennsylvania called aptitud^ 
tests "redundant when gooci 
measures of past performance 
are available," citing that high 
school grades and achievement 
test scores were the best 
predictors of college grades. 

Shropshire does not predict 
that Clarion will drop the SAT 
from its admissions criteria. 

The National Student News 
Service also contributed to this 
report. 




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Page 4 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



Page 5 



Hide Park 

(cont.frompg. 2) 



"I don't know Mister Heecem, 
couldn't she be sent by her 
father? I could see my way to 
write him in as a house- 
husband." 

"No, that's no good. Mister 
Sherman, everyone knows that 
men are deadbeats now-days, 
we'll write him in as having 
skipped out on them. Or better 
yet, Jen's mother could have had 
her as a lifestyle choice, you 
know, like Murphy Brown. Yeah. 
That's it!" 

"Uh, well-" 

"Great, now Rodney, may I 
call you Rodney? Great, now the 
snacks that Jen is taking to 
Grandma, cookies, cakes, 
pudding, and pie. That won't 
work. Better fill that basket with 
rice cakes, nuts, and lowfat, high 
protein, low sodium, genuine 
artificial bran muffins. Maybe 
throw in a bottle of imported 
spring water. Have it all 
packaged in environmentally 
safe, re-cycled containers. No 
plastic stuff. And make sure the 
basket wasn't made in a third 
world country by exploited 
workers." 
"I guess I could-" 

"Great, now you have Little 
Red Riding Hood stopping to-" 
"You mean Jen." 

"Oh yeah, Jen. You have Jen 
stopping tc pick flowers for 
grandma, kill that idea, the 



nature conservationists would rip 
us apart. This part won't get 
past Al Gore. Have Jen BUY 
some flowers, maybe at a 
minority owned shop. And get 
some sun screen on the kid. 
vShe's outside in the sun, and we 
have that hole in the ozone layer 
debate." 

"Sun-screen?" 

"Great, now Mister Sherman, 
about this 'big, bad, wolf, you 
know out west we have that 
group, PAGWABR, you know. 
People Against Giving Wolfs A 
Bum Rap. They aren't going to 
like the way you portrayed the 
wolf 

"Why is the wolf bad? Because 
he has been repressed, 
suppressed, hunted, pushed off 
his land, and called nasty names. 
He is a victim, not a villain. 
Better find another animal to 
chase Jen." 

"A different animal? I don't-" 

"That's the spirit, how about a 
chicken? You know, a sweet 
little chicken who is exposed to 
illegally dumped toxic waste 
during the horrible 80s. That 
way it's not the chickens fault 
that he turned evil." 

"A mutant chicken?" 

"I knew you would love it. 
Now Rodney, it is Rodney isn't 
it, about grandma's house, it's 
great that you show grandma 
living independently and on her 



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own, but what is she doing at 
home all day? Let's get her out 
doing volunteer work or maybe 
teaching an aerobics class. 

"And one other correction, we 
better not refer to her as a kind 
'old' lady. Dump the 'old' and 
maybe say 'chronologically 
gifted'. And make sure the 
neighborhood is ethnically 
diversified." 

"Is that all? I mean you-" 

"Now that you mention it, it's 
this thing about the wolf... I 
mean chicken, wearing 
Grandmas clothes to fool Jen. 
That is going to upset the 
ASOCDWASOBPAKODTTS " 
"The ASOCDWASOBPAKQ. 
DTTS?" 

"Yeah, the American Society 
Of Cross Dressers Who Are Sick 
Of Being Portrayed As Kooks 
On Day Time Talk Shows. We 
don't need them picketing 
outside our bookstores. Cross 
dressers must be shown in a 
positive light now." 

"I see, maybe we should just 
forget-" 

"And about this lumber-jack 
coming to the rescue with an 
axe. Two big problems here 
buddy, can I call you buddy? 
Great, now about ,4hat 
lumberjack, he is a no-no. 
Lumber-jacks cut down trees and 
spotted owls live in trees. Of 
course cutting down trees leads 
to the greenhouse effect. Let's 
make a homeless man with a 
tender and loving heart, who is a 
victim of a cold and cruel 
capitalistic society. 

"Have to ditch the axe. We 
don't need trouble with the 
AMANP." 

"I'm afraid to ask." 
"Axe Murderers Against 
Negative Publicity." 

"I must have forgotten." 
"One more thing Rodney, I 
can call you Rodney right?, the 
closing line, 'And they lived 
happily ever after.' Has to go. 
No-one lives happily in America 
any more. Gloom and doom is 
the thing to dwell on now. 
Change it to 'They lived happily 
until the next Republican 
president?" 

"I don't know, I-" 

"Great, now we thought you 
could re-work the three little 
pigs " 

Rodney Sherman is a junior 
Communication major 



Dave Barry 

Gaining insights into Eur ope(m^ culture 

©The Miami Herald 



Recently, in an effort to gain 
insights into the European 
currency crisis, not to mention 
large quantities of weight, my 
family and I went to Italy. 

Our plan was to rent a car and 
drive around on winding, 
picturesque Italian roads. 
Because we are international 
travel sophisticates, we went in 
the middle of August, which is 
when the entire population of 
Italy, including statues, goes on 
vacation. It turns out that the 
No. 1 Italian vacation activity is 
to get in a car and drive around 
on winding, picturesque roads, at 
approximately the speed of light. 

When we picked up our car in 
Rome, I asked a man for 
directions; he told me to start by 
driving the wrong way up a one- 
way street. "Isn't that a one-way 
street?" I asked. "Yes," he said, 
shrugging. "But who reads the 
signs?" 

As far as I could tell, in 10 
days of driving around Italy, 
there is only one strict traffic 
regulation: You are NOT 
allowed to be behind another 
motorist. If somebody is in front 
of you, you MUST, by law, get 
past this person, even if you are 
on a winding, hiUside road the 
width of a strand of No. 8 
spaghetti, next to a humongous 
cliff Several times I was passed 
by drivers who, as far as I could 
tell, got past me by driving right 
off the cliffs edge, so that their 
cars were briefly hanging right 
out in space. 

We were on many small roads, 
because we stayed in some 
picturesque hill village built a 
thousand years ago by people 
who put massive stone walls 
around them to indicate that 
these villages were never 
intended for automobile traffic. 
But you have to try to drive in 
them anyway, to reach your 
hotel. To do this, you follow a 
series of arrows, apparently put 
up by prankster villagers, which 
lead you through a winding maze 
of streets, sometimes passing the 
same point four or five times 
before reaching the center of the 
town, where the pranksters laugh 
as you inch your car through 
streets so narrow that they make 
the winding, hillside road look 
like the New Jersey turnpike, 
with stone walls practically 
scraping your car on both- sides 
and even overhead, so that you 
appear to be driving inside 
ancient Roman air-conditioning 
ducts, clenching the wheel in 
terror, convinced that you're 



about to drive into somebody's 
living room. 

Once we reached the hotel, we 
did fine, thanks to my 
sophisticated international 
knowledge of Italian. I had 
memorized the Italian 
expressions for "I do not speak 
Italian," and "Do you speak 
English?" As a result, on two 
occasions, I sU"ode confidently up 
to the hotel desk person and stated, 
in crude Italian, "I do not speak 
English." 

Fortunately, the Italians are 
low on snoot, so we were ueated 
well despite comunicating like 
tourist versions of Tonto ("We 
stay in room with toilet, yes?"). 
We ate many wonderful meals in 
the Italian style, wherein they 
keep bringing you more courses, 
and when you finally stagger 
away from the table, they follow 
you to your room and stuff food 
into your mouth while you sleep. 

But of all our experiences, the 
one I remember most vividly 
was when we were in the 
Dolomite Alps, an area of 
historical importance and 
spectacular natural beauty, and I 
realized — as perhaps such 
visitors as Hannibal and 
Napoleon had realized before me 
-- that our passports were 
missing. So I reported this loss to ' ' 
the local police, who typed up 
and handed me a detailed 
document that I believe said, in 
Italian: "The people holding this 
document have no idea what it 
says, but it will certainly get them 
out of our hair. Thank you." 

In my sophistication, I actually 
believed that this document 
would be an adequate replace- 
meiit for our passports. You can 
imagine how comical this 
seemed to the authorities when 
we got to the Milan airport and 
attempted to leave Italy. So our 
plane took off without us, and 
we got to spend a whole extra 
day in Italy, rearranging our 
travel plans and trying to prove 
to the American Consulate that 
we were Americans and should 
be permitted to return home. 
During this process, I thought a lot 
about Sheik Omar Abdel-Rahman, 
whom our government cheerfully 
admitted despite the fact that he 
listed his occupation, on his visa 
application, as "Terrorist Loon." 

Not that I am bitter. Anyway, 
we eventually go home, bringing 
with us valuable insights into the 
European currency situation, the 
main one being that if you go over 
there, you should take a lot of it. 
Dave Barry is a syndicated 
columnist with the Miami Herald 



News 



News Special 



Sexual assault: What to do if it happens 



by Rodney L. Sherman 
News Editor 

With the increased awareness 
of sexual assault by Clarion 
University students, there is 
some confusion among students 
about the terms used in sexual 
assault cases and the procedures 
that take place after an assault 
occurs. 

Sexual assault is an act of 
violence. Victims need 
immediate help, both physically 
and emotionally. The trauma of 
rape is overwhelming and the 
systems that a victim must deal 
with after an attack can be 
intimidating. 

According to a new pamphlet 
being distributed by Public 
Safety, the first pricoity is to seek 
medical attention. A victim of 
sexual assualt could suffer 
ext^nal or internal injuries that 
require immediate attention. A 
medical examination could also 
provide important evidence of 
rape for p-osecution. 

Public Safety will assist a 
victim in getting to medical 
assistance. If Public Safety 
cannot transport a victim directly 
to the hospital, an ambulance can 
be called. The Rape Crisis 
Center (RCC, 226-RAPE, or hot 
line 911) also provides a trained 



staff to assist a victim . 

The goal of the Rape Crisis 
Center is to help all victims of 
rape understand the inner 
emotional reactions and the 
medical and legal systems that 
come into play once the crime 
has occurred. 

A medical examination is 
conducted at Clarion Hospital 
following a reported rape. If the 
victim wishes to keep the cation 
of prosecution open, the exam at 
the hospital ensures that legal 
evidence is obtained. This 
evidence would include human 
hair, evidence of seminal stains 
and other identifying markers. 

Follow-up care for disease, 
injury or pregnancy is available 
at the hospital. Counseling is 
recommended and available at 
Counseling Services, 148 Egbert 
Hall, 226-2255, or at the Rape 
Crisis Center, 226-Rape or 
STAR, 226-2720. 

The second thing to remember 
in the event of an assualt is NOT 
to bathe or douche. Although it 
might be the fu^t thing a victim 
wants to do, bathing or douching 
might destroy valuable evidence. 

Thirdly, save the clothing. It is 
alright to change clothes, but do 
not wash the clothes the victim 
was wearing. Again, valuable 
evidence might be destroyed. 




Help and counseling is available to rape victims at the Rape 
Main Street, near The Red Stallion. 



Place all items in a paper bag. 

Following these steps, report 
the incident to the PubUc Safety 
office. Public Safety does not 
determine if a crime has 
h^pened (x not, that decision is 
made later by the District 
Attorney's office. Victims of 
sexual assault must file charges 
as well as a report. The decision 



is the victiih's, but, according to 
the RCC, rapists are usually 
repeat offenders and police can 
only apprehend offenders when 
they know about the crime. 

Officers will be assigned to 
work with the victim, help the 
victim and apprehend the 
offender. All contact with the 
university officers will be 



Christin Mihon / Clarion Call 
Crisis Center located at 301 

confidential. 

The necessity for prompt 
reporting cannot be 
overemphasized. If an attacker 
rapes you, notify Public Safety 
immediately. 

The new pamphlet comes with 
a detachable wallet sized card 
with a condensed version of the 
above tips. 



What are the legal definitions of sexual crimes? 



by Rodney L. Sherman 

News Editor 

What is rape? Statutory rape? 
Definitions of sexual assault 
terms are often confused and 
misunderstood. Listed are some 
terms and their meanings 
according to the Pennsylvania 
Crimes Code. 

Rape: A person commits a 
felony of the first degree when 
he engages in sexual intercourse 
with another person not his 
spouse: 

(1) by forcible compulsicMi; 

(2) by threat of forcible 
compulsion that would prevent 
resistance by a person of 
reasonable resolution; 

(3) who is unconscious; or 

(4) who is mentally deranged 
or deficient that such person is 
incapable of consent. 



Statutory rape: A person who 
is 18 years of age or older 
commits statutory rape, a felony 
of the second degree, when he 
engages in sexual intercourse 
with another person not his 
spouse who is less than 14 years 
of age. 

Involuntary deviate sexual 
intercourse: A person commits 
a felony of the ftfst degree when 
he engages in deviate sexual 
intercourse with another person: 
(1) by forcible compulsion; 

(2) by threat of forcible 
compulsion that would prevent 
resistance by a person of 
reasonable resolution; 

(3) who is unconscious; 

(4) who is so mentally deranged 
or deficient that such person is 
incapable of consent; cm- 

(5) who is less than 16 years of 



age. 
Aggravated indecent assault: 

A person commits a felony of 
the second degree when he 
engages in penetration, however 
slight, of the genitals or anus of 
another with a part of the actor's 
txxly for any purpose other than 
good faith medical, hygienic or 
law enforcement procedures if: 

(1) he does so without the 
consent of the other person; 

(2) he knows that the other 
person suffers from a mental 
disease or defect which renders 
him or her incapable of 
appraising the nature of his or 
her conduct; 

(3) he knows that the other 
person is unaware that the 
indecent contact is being 
committed; 

(4) he has substantially 



impaired the other person's 
power to appraise or control his 
or her conduct by administering 
or employing without the 
knowledge of the other, drugs, 
intoxicants or other means for 
the purpose of preventing 
resistance; 

(5) the other person is in 
custody of law or detained in a 
hospital or odier institution and 
the actor has supervisory or 
disciplinary authority over him 
or her; or 

(6) he is over 18 years of age 
and the other person is under 14 
years of age. 

Indecent assault: (The 
conditions for this charge are the 
same as the conditions for 
aggravated indecent assault with 
the offense being described as): 
A person who has indecent 



contact with another not his 
spouse, or causes such odier to 
have indecent contact with him. 
This crime is a second degree 
misdemeanor unless the victim is 
under 14 years of age, in which 
case it is a first degree 
misdemeanor. 

Indecent exposure: A person 
commits a misdemeanor of the 
second degree if, for die purpose 
of arousing or gratifying sexual 
desire of himself or of any 
person other than his spouse, he 
exposes his genitals under 
circumstances in which he 
knows his conduct is likely to 
cause affront or alarm. 

The Pennsylvania Crimes 
Code also contains definitions of 
spousal sexual assault which 
differ slightly in wording and 
legal intent. 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



News Feature 



A career in your chosen field? Maybe and maybe not 



by Christy Williams 
News Writer 



This year the Department of 
Labor estimates there will be 
4,300 new jobs for 
psychologists, while colleges 
will award 58,430 bachelor's 
degrees in Psychology. 

A total of 224,000 
Communication majors are 
expected to graduate in 1994. All 
of the daily newspapers in the 
country combined are expected 
to hire a total of 4,600 reporters 
this year. Radio and television 
stations may hire a total of 1,500 
announcers; most of them at 
local radio stations. 

Nonpublishing organizations 
will need 3,000 technical writers 
and 15,400 public relations 
workers. Eiven if new graduates 
could get all these jobs, over 
199,500 of them would have to 
find another means of 
employment. 

Sociology has become a 
favorite major for some students. 
Male sociologists from the 
University of Wisconsin reported 
as gainfully employed a year 
after graduation included a legal 
secretary, sports editor. Peace 
Corps worker, truck unloader, 
and a stockboy. No sociologist. 
The highest paid worker of the 
group worked at the Post Office. 
Schools of Architecture are 
expected to turn out twice as 
many graduates than are needed. 
The only profession that seems 




Clarion Call photos 
Clarion University's student body is as diverse as the careers they have chosen to pursue. Department of Labor figures 
may paint a dark picture though. Students are graduating at a far greater pace than the job market is able to absorb them. 



to be exceeding the number of 
graduates, at present, is 
engineering. With the many 
different types of engineering 
offered at colleges this, however, 
is hard to judge. Whatever 
college graduates want to do, 
ultimately, they are going to do 
what there is to do. 

During the next few years, 
according to the Department of 
Labor, the biggest demand will 
be for stenographers, seaetaries, 
retail clerks, sales workers. 




E R A P Y 

SATURDAY MORNING 

SPORTS MEDICINE CLINIC 

AT 

CLARION HOSPITAL 
OUTPATIENT REHAB 

EVERY SATURDAY FROM 
9T0 11A.M. 

Staffed by an orthopedic physician, X-ray techni- 
cian, certified athletic trainers & physical therapists. 
They vj\\\ help you get back to the game FAST! 

Call 226-1356 for more information. 

No appointment necessan'- 



hospital attendants, nurse's aides, 
receptionists, cooks, fast food 
workers, cosmotologists, 
hairdressers and industrial 
machine repairmen. 

College graduates are selling 
shoes and delivering pizzas^. 
Young people have-been told^ 
they have to go t6 college 
because our economy at present 
can't absorb an army of 
untrained eighteen year-olds. 

Disillusioned graduates are 
realizing that the economy can 
no longer absorb an army of 
trained twenty-two year-olds 
either. This is not to mention the 
growing number of returning 
adult students who hope that an 
education will secure their 
financial future. 

A college degree is a good 
way for an employer to screen 
candidates for employment. An 
employer may figure it will be 
easier to train and rely on people 



COMMUNITY SERVICE 

Terry Logan, coordinator 
266 Gemmell 226-2399 

October 6 (Wednesday) 
Food For Friends Soup Kitchen 

October 2 & 3 

S.A. F.E. (Stop Abuse For Everyone) 

Historic House Tour 

President's House, Moore Hal\ 

1 :00 - 5:00 each day 

CHANGE OF DATE!! 

Habitat Homeless 

for a Weekend 

November 5 & 6 



who have gotten through four or 
more years of college. 

This, in the words of Harvard's 
Christopher Jenkins, is "a hell of 
an expensive aptitude test." 

When students on Clarion 
campus were asked why they 
came to coUge, the answers were 
as varied as the students 
themselves: 

• Lisa Daniels ? 
Freshman Biology major 
"Because I want to make 
something out of my life. Also, I 
wanted to get out of the small 
town I lived in." 

•Melodi Dess 

Sophmore Psychology major 

"You can't make a decent living 

without a college education" 

•Carla Veronosi 

Freshman Speech Pathology 

major 

"I want to get a good job and 

make a lot of moiiey." 

• Ric Frederick 
Senior Theatre major 

"I'll do anything to delay the real 
world." 

• Maureen Mackintosh 
Senior Communications major 



"To save the world." 

• Brenda White 

Sophmore Secondary Education 

English majcx* 

"To Party." j 

• Mike Holquist 

Junior Speech Communications 

Theatre major 

"Without a college degree I'll be 

working at Subway for the rest 

of my life." 

•Liza Dexter 

Freshman undecided major 

"My mom made me go to 

college, I guess." 

• Pete O'Rourke 

Sophmore Speech Pathology 
major 

"To gain a greater self 

independence." 

•Scott Calderwood 

Senior Conmiunications major 

"To find a better job." 

•Susan Slat 

Senior Conmiunications and Art 

major 

"To get an education." 

And finally: 
•Scott Campbell 
Sophmore Economics 
"To become intelligent." 







$1.00 Off when you | 
buy 2 beef burritos j 

Not valid w / any other offer Expires 10-30 ' 



]@ MEXICAN VILLAGE 



J 



BOOK NOOK 

20 % OFF ANY BOOK 

Excludes sale items 
Expires 10-16-93 

226-5120 532 Main Street 






Buy 2 Hard shell 
Tacos get 1 free 

Not vaM w/ any other offer Expires 10-30 



i 
t 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
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I 
J 




Free Chips & sauce 

Hot or mild w / purchase 

of a grinder 

Not valid w/ any other offer Expires 10-30 



Across from Clarion Mall 



r- 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 

I 




I Free small drink w/ purchase 
of Large Taco salad 

Not valid w/ any other offer Expires 10-30 



NACHOS 

Nachos w/cheese 1.50 

Nachos w/cheese& jalapenos 1.65 

Nachos Supreme (w/ sour cream) 3.50 

TOSTADAS 

A crisp com tort topped with hot sauce 

and choice of topping 

Cheese 1.00 

Beef 1.15 

Bean 1.15 

SALADS 

Taco Sm. 1.25, Lg. 2.25 

Taco meat, lettuce, chips,olives,cheese 
tomato and our own fecial dressing 

Tossed 1.50 

Grilled Chicken 2.95 

TACOS 
Beef Hard Shell 99 

Beef Soft Shell 1.04 

Bean Soft Shell 1.09 

BURRITOS 

Beef Sm. 1 .25, Lg 2.25 

Beef & Bean Sm. 1 .75, Lg 2.75 

Bean Sm. 1 .75, Lg 2.75 

Chicken Sm. 1.75, Lg 2.75 

Open Friday and Saturday until 12:00 

WE DELIVER FREE WITHIN 5 MILES OF CLARION • All prices subject to 
change without notice • 'Daily Specials' 



Free delivery 

226-7166 



Beef. 



MEXICAN PIZZA 



.3.25 




Beef & Bean 3.50 

EXTRAS 

Grinder 2.85 

Taco meat on bun w/cheese, lettuce and tomato o 

Chill Sm. 1.10, Lg 2.10 

Mexican Chill Sm. 1.15, Lg 2.15 

Mexi bread included with all chili 

Refried Beans w/ cheese 1 .00 

Mexi-bread (corn bread) 45 

SoftStix 1.50 

Nacho cheese filled soft pretzel stick 

Chips and Hot Sauce (mild or hot) 1.25 

Guacamole Dip 50 

Sour Cream 25 

BEVERAGES 

Pepsi, Diet Pepsi, Dr. Pepper, Slice, Mt. Dew 

Sm. .60 Med. .70 Lg. .80 

Milk 60 

Tea 60 

Tea (hot) 55 

Coffee 55 

Bottled water(Clearly Canadian) 1 .00 

SWEETS 

Sante Fe Crisp 50 

Ice Cream 75 

Hot Apple & Cinnamon Sundae 95 




the Ciarioii Call: thurscTay, September 30, 1993 



. f 1 u »• Corps, although the Clinton plan 

A sense of celebration f > © f 



education, local 
Service, which will fund training governments, school districts. 



to the call for service. 



News tips on any topic 

can be reported to the 

Clarion Call at: 

226-2380 



Censorship awards given 



AUDITIONS 



William Shakespeare's 

MUCH • AD© 
• AB0UT • 
NOTHING 



courtesy of 

College Press Service 

Winners of the 1.99^ Arts 
Censors of the Year kwards, a 
dubious honor bestowed by the 
American Civil Liberties Union 
on those who show "an 
exceptional disregard for the 
First Amendment," were recently 
announced in New YotIc. 

The names of the organizations 
and individuals were released 
during Banned Books Week, 
which was celebrated the last 
week in September. "This year's 
art censors span the political 



spectrum but share an 
intolerance for expressimi they 
consider offensive," re^s the 
literature on the cdntest. .^"^'^ 

"A number of this year's 
censors are public officials or 
elected boards that have used the 
weight and authority of their 
offices to wage campaigns 
against artists, authors, students 
and musicians over the past 
year," said Marjorie Heins, 
director of the ACLU's National 
Arts Censorship Project. 

U.S. Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C, 
a shoo-in for the prize according 



The Little Theatre (Marwick Boyd 1 53) 
October 6 & 7, 4-6 PM 



Speaking Roles available for: 17 Men, 4 Women 

EVERYONE WELCOME! 

no prior sign-up necessary 



What to expect: Cold readings from the script 
and/or a prepared reading from the play. 



MORE INFO: Call 226-2476 or 226-2284 



Clarion Kiwanis Scholarship Available 

The Clarion Kiwanis club will be awarding a $250.00 
scholarship to an upperclass Clarion County student 
attending Clarion University with a grade point of at least 
3.0. The scholarship will be awarded for the Spring 
semester. The scholarship is a non-refundable one time 
award. Applications are available at the Financial Aid 
Office; Egbert Hall; and need to be returned no later than 
Oct. 29, 1993, to: 

Clarion Kiwanis Club 
ATTN: Cathy Schrecengost 
' Box 43 
Clarion, PA 16214 



to officials, was the only 
individual to win other than 
Nfeyor TeiaFndcc^ Anchorage, 
Alaska who, according to the 
ACLU, "used his power to 
crusade against the arts in 
Anchorage by attacking works 
that violated his political 
ideology and trying to force 
content restrictions on arts 
funding." 

Helms, a foe of the National 
Endowment of the Arts," has 
been charged by the ACLU as a 
"symbol of the far right's 
campaign to limit personal 
freedoTis in the name of 
imposing a single moral standard 
on Americans." 

The Federal Communications 
Commission, whicb the ACLU 
claims attempted to silence radio 
personality Howard Stem and a 
school district that confiscated 
books and another that halted 
production of a student mural on 
the First Amendment were 
among the government bodies 
named by the ACLU. 

"Censorship takes many forms 
and guises," said Heins. "The 
people and groups we've named 
share an impulse to stifle those 
they disagree with." 



tast weekl «rllele Idcusinj^ on Dr. Isell Knrass* research on bingo and older 
adults omitted the names of Jenny Heeter ^uid Christen Grunenwald. Both have 
made contributions in the study. Jill FomeUi's name was misspelled due to a 
typing error and the correct telephone number for Dr. Krauss' office is 226-1991, 
with the correct telephone number for the Psychology Department being 226- 
2295. The proper estin^te of bingo players in the y^ 



fzg^b 



Outside Clarion 



Yeltsin maintains his grip on power 



courtesy of 
Associated Press 



International 

Yeltsin rules out compromise 

President Boris Yeltsin ruled 
out any compromise Monday 
with hard-line lawmakers who 
remained barricaded in 
parliament with dwindling 
support and no electricity, hot 
water or telephones. 

Yeltsin's tough stand and 
constant pressure from hundreds 
of flak-jacketed riot police 
appeared to be eroding the will 
of his opponents, who were 
weakened by deflections and 
miserable conditions inside the 
Russian White House. 

Speaking confidently on 
national TV, Yeltsin rejected 
proposals for simultaneous 
presidential and parliamentary 
elections. 



Shevardnadze in hiding 

Abkhazian seperatists captured 
Sukhumi on Monday after 12 
days of bitter combat, forcing 
Georgian leader Eduard 
Sheverdnadze to flee the 
devastated city he had vowed to 
defend. 

Abkhazian forces fought their 
way to the center of the city and 
raised their flag over City Hall, 
Shevardnadze said in a message 
to his office in Tbilisi, the 
Georgian capital. 

Smallest ocean boat 

A retired airline pilot stepped 
ashore Monday after reclaiming 
the record for a trans-Atlantic 
crossing in the smallest boat 

Hugo Vihlen, 61, of 
Homestead Fla., made the 
crossing in a boat five feet four 
inches long in 104 days. 



National 

U.S. POW's were shipped to 
U.S.S.R. 

A U.S. report on American 
servicemen missing in the 
Korean War sketches a chilling 
picture of American airmen 
being hunted by Soviet 
intelligence teams and shipped 
off to labor camps. 

The report, which was 
provided to Russian officials at a 
recent meeting in Moscow, 
alleges that several hundred 
American POW's were secretly 
taken into the Soviet Union in 
the 1950's and never returned. 

Moscow has always denied 
such charges, although it has 
said some U.S. aviators on non- 
Korean War missions were 
captured. The Soviets claimed 
the flights were spy missions 
and fired oa the planes. 




courtesy of 
College Press Service 

Enrollments up 

The number of students 
enrolled in public and private 
institutions is expected to reach a 
new high of 15 million this fall, 
Secretary of Education Richard 
Riley said in the annual "Back to 
School" forecast. 

The number of earned degrees 
that will be awarded this 
academic year is also expected to 
set records. According to 
Department of Education 
estimates, 504,000 associate 
degrees will be awarded; 1.1 
million bachelor's degrees will 
be awarded; 378,000 master's 
degrees; 41,000 doctorates; and 
75,000 professional degrees in 
medicine, theology and law. 

It is estimated that colleges and 
universities will spend about 
$198.1 billion in 1993-94, up 
three percent since 1992. 

Average spending per full-time 
student is forecast to reach 
$15,900, up 23 percent since 
1983-84. Public college 
spending averages $13,400 per 
student; for private colleges, 
spending averages $24,000. 



Mandela nominated for 
honorary degree 

African National Congress 
founder Nelson Mandela may be 
offered an honorary degree by 
the University of Florida in 
Gainesville for his work in 
hjrnnn rights in South Africa. 

There are some behind-the- 
scenes discussion on the matter, 
said Peter Schmidt, director of 
the Center for African Studies at 
UP. 

"It's in delicate negotiations 
right now. We haven't heard 
yet," Schmidt said. A formal 
invitation will be sent to 
Mandela if he is interested in 
accepting. Mandela was 
nominated by Schmidt and 
Professor Carlton Davis. 



Fraternity evicted from house 

A University of Arizona 
fraternity was evicted from its 
chapter house because the 
building was so badly U^hed it 
was uninhabitable, the Arizona 
Daily Wildcat reported in 
September. 

The Theta Delta Chi fraternity 
was charged with criminal 
damages in an amount of more 
than $250,000, plus $18,000 in 
unpaid bills. Under the chapter's 
lease agreement, the fraternity 
was responsible for maintaining 
the house. 

Investigators discovered 
excrement on the floors, fire 
extinguishers that had been 
discharged and noted that the 
roof needed replaced. 




eKeJNCr»tette|-''?o^rB^U: 

• SOUND SYSTEM • AND MORE < 

"Thursday Night Special" 

Pitcher & Draft Specials 8-10 pm 

Tuesday Sunday 

Biggest Wings Karaoke 

In Town Hours 

(.25c each) gp^ . -fam 



782-3482 
Monday 

Pitcher 

& Wing 

Specials 



Ofticers sprung from jail 

Officer Laurence Powell had 
already spent his first night in 
prison for the beating of Rodney 
King and Sgt. Stacey Koon was 
just surrendering, when a judge 
suddenly allowed them to go free 
Monday. 

U.S. District Judge John G. 
Davies gave Powell and Koon 
about two weeks to appeal to the 
U.S. Supreme Court, setting Oct. 
12 as the new date for them to 
start serving their two and a half 
year prison terms. 

Both men faced a deadline of 
noon Monday for checking into 
the Dublin Federal Prison Camp, 
a converted military barricks 
without bars or fences 40 miles 
east of San Francisco. 

Powell surrendered at the 
prison Sunday afternoon. Koon 
arrived around the time Davies 
issued his rulings, and hadn't yet 
been processed. 

Attorney William Kopney, 
representing the two, said he 
would file an emergency request 
Tuesday with U.S. Supreme 
Court JustiQe San^ra^ Day 
O'Connor, asking that the men be 
allowed to remain free on bail 
while they appeal their 
convictions and sentences. A 
decision is expected soon. 



r 



Woman admits killing baby 

A Wheeling Jesuit College 
student pleaded guilty to 
voluntary manslaughter Monday 
in the deaUi of her newborn. 

Ohio County Circuit Judge 
George Spillers allowed Suzanne 
Fenton to remain free on 
$220,000 bond for two years, 
after which she may change her 
plea to involuntary manslaughter 
and then serve three years of 
probation. 

If Fenton violates her bond or 
probation, she could be 
sentenced to up to five years in 
prison for voluntary 
manslaughter or up to one year 
for involuntary manslaughter, 
Prosecutor Melvin Kahle said. 

Psychologists for both sides 
testified on Fenton's behalf. 

Postal rate break agreed on 

Newspapers and nonprofit 
organizations will pay higher 
mail rates under a congressional 
compromise, but not as soon or 
as much as many had feared. 

iHouae^d Senate Conferees 
reached preliminary agreement 
on a bill that will let the 
nonprofit groups send out 
catalogs at discount rates this 
Christmas season. 



SAFE to form classes 

stop Abuse For Everyone, Inc. (SAFE), Clarion 
County's domestic violence agency, is seeking sincere 
adults to become members of the volunteer staff. The 
training program will include instruction in crisis 
intervention and communication/listening skills. 

'n-aining will begin October 5. Sessions will meet on 
Tuesday and Thursday evenings, there will be one 
Saturday morning session as well, and sessions will 
conclude November 10. Interested individuals should 
call 226-8481 for more information. 



Fall Special 



Bob's 

Sub and Sandwich Shop 

$1.00 OFF ANY SENIOR SUB 
GOOD FOR WHOLE WEEK 

Not valid with any other offer 
FREE DELIVERY 

Spend Hi He Casln.Gei service Fasf 




PagelCf' 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



Cable Channels 



iSS TV 

DATP 



THURSDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 30. 1993 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



(3:00) 'And the Band Played On' (1993) q 



Donahw (In Stereo) Q 



Empty Ne»t |Ch— mq 



Opfati Winfrey q 



Les Brown 



10 To m-Jerry 

11 i Copeq 



Tiny To on 



Cht. Affair 



(3:00) ' Amazm Grace 



MwOut(R) 



Pyramid 



Dream Lg. 



Pyramid 



Neweq 



Coach q 



5:30 



LHe Stories 



Newaq 



News 



Qeraldo 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Animaniacs I Batman q 



Newsq 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



Pi^ice Academy 5: Miami Beach 



Newsq 



News 



News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



Full House q 



Newsq 



Roseanne q 



NBC News 



*•% "The Big Gamble" (1961) Stephen Boyd 



NFL Yrbk. 



Parfcer Lewis 



Max Out 



FacU of Ufa 



** 'The Proud Ones" (1953. Drama) Michele Morgan 



(2:30) 



Muppets 



*•* 'Georges Island" {^969) PG' 
CraiyKlds IHey Dude(R)IGute~ 



**V; "The Outside Woman" (1969) Sharon Gless. 



Sr.PQA 



NNaTurHes 



Up Close 



NlniaTirtes 



Hard Copy q 



Jeopardy! q 



Copsq 



CBS News 



Roseanne q 



Jeopwdylq 



7:30 



8:00 



8:30 



** "Dream Machine' (1991) Corey Halm 



Ent Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married.. 



Am.Jownal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



Missing Persons (In Stereo) 



Mad-You iWings q 



In the Heat of the Night q 



In the Heat of the Night q 



Simpsons q 



Mad-You 



Sint>adq 



Winwq 



**V2 "Mhouta Trace" (1983. Drama) Judd Hirsch. PG 



SportsceittBr 



Major Dedq 



Kickoff 



Wings q 



*V2 "Beastmaster 2: Through the Porta of Time" (1991) 



9:00 



9:30 



10:00 



**% "Trancers III: Deth L(V9S"(1992) R' 



Matlockq 



Seinfeld q iFrasler q 



Eye to Eye (In Stereo) q 



Eye to Eye (In Stereo) q 



In Color 



Seinfeld q 



Herman 



Fraaierq 



10:30 



Primetfawe Live q 



Comedy Jam 



DateBne (In Stereo) q 



Angel Falls (In Stereo) q 



Angel FaMs (In Stereo) q 



Mama 



Mama 



DateHne (In Stereo) q 



College Feoawril: UCLA at San Dieqo State. (Live) 



**V!i "Any Which Way You Can" (1980) Clint Eastwood. 



Murder, She Wrote q I*** Private Benjamin" (1960, Comedy) Goldie Hawrv 



Movie 



What You Do 



8<»ermaifcet 



** "The Karate Kid Part /«" (1989) Ralph Macchio. PG' 



**V2 -Top Secret!" (1^) Vaf Kilmer. \*V2 "In the Heat of Passion" (1^1)^ 



Looney 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



IBuNwinlde 



Unsolved Myrtenes 



Chris Cross 



Get Smart 



LA.UW 



** "L/mwf5a/So<dii8f"(1992) Jean-Claude Van Damme. 



Dragnet 



[Bob Newhart IMJTMoore |M.T. Moore 



** "Quiet KiKer" (1992. Drama) Kate Jackson. 



11:00 



11:30 



Inside the NFL q 



Newsq Cheersq iNighMineq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



12:00 



"Quick "'R' 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In Stereo) q 



Edition 



Chevy Chase (In Stereo) q ILove Con 



Late Show q 



News q ITonight Show (In Stereo) q 



***V2 "The Road Warrior" (1961) 'R' 



Baseball Sportsoenter 



Major Dad q iwmas o lOdd Couple 
** "Demonic Toys" (1992, Horror) 'R' q 



Red Shoe 



VanPylte 



"Waxwork II: Lost in Time" 



Lucy Show 



Unsolved Myateries iMysteries 



A. HKchcock 



FRIDAY EVENING OCTOBER 1. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



(3:00) "Regarding Henry" q 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



Empty Nest [Cheers q 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry 



Copsq 



(3:00) 



Tiny Toon 



Cur. Affair 



5:06 I 5:30 I 6:00 
*Vi "Defense Play" {^%S) David Oliver. 



Newsq 



Coach q 



Newsq 



Qeraldo 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Newsq 



ifriy I 
ill 



Animaniacs IBatfwan q 



Newsq 



News 



6:30 



7H» 



Inside the NFL q 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



FuH House q 



Newsq 



NBC News 



***V; "The Adventures of Baron Munchausen' (1989) John Neville. 



Senior PGA QoH : Vantage Championship - First Round. 
Pyramid [Pyramid iParlter Lewis 1 Facte of Life' 



**'/; "My Blue Heaven" (1990) Steve Martin. 'PG-13' q 



(3:00) "Big Girls Don't Cry" 



Muppets iCraiyKids 



MotoworW 



NInja Turtles 



Up Close 



Ninja Turtles 



Hard Copy C3 



^wmWO 



Co»»0 



CBS News 



Rose an ne q 



J«»i>««Wq 



7:30 



8KM 



6:30 



Boxing: Frank Brwo vs. Lerwiox Lewis, q 



Ent Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



FamHv IBoy-World 



Againrt ttie Grain "Pitot" q 



R Had to Be Album 



9:00 



9:30 



loioT 



10:30 



•** 



'Oaadflafiq"(l989, Suspense) Don Johnson. R' q 
Step by Step IMr. Cooper |»/Mq 



Secrets of Lalte Success "A Family Aftair" q 



Day in the Life of Country Music (In Stereo) q 



Major League 



Married.. 



Wh.Fortaw 



: Pittstxjrgh Pirates at Montreal Expos. From Olympk; Stadium. 



Brisco County, Jr. 



Againat the Grain "Pitof q 



*i>Vz "Little Minders" {^97^, Comedy) Eltott GouM. PG' 



X-Files "Conduit" q 



IMama 



Am.Joumal 



Mama 



Secrete of Lake Succew "A Family Affair ' q 



Sportscenter 



M^orDadq 



Major League BaselMll: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



**Vi "The Black Windmill" (1974) Michael Caine. PG' 



11:00 



Crypttalw 



Newsq 



Newsq 



11:30 



Satwlars 



Cheersq 



12555" 



Comedy Jam 



NightHneq 



Tonight Show (in Stereo) q 



Edition 



Show (In Stereo) q 



Chevy Chaae (In Stereo) q 



Late Show q 



Love Con. 



News q ITonight Show (In Stereo) q 



*** 



"Murder by Death" m76) VQ' 



Wings q 



••• "The Butchers W/fe "(1991) Demi Moore. 'PG-13 



**'.'2 



*•* "Bite the Bulle t 
HeyDude(R)|Qute' 



(1975, Western) Gene Hackman. (In Stereo) PG 



What You Do 



"Mary Jane Harper Cried Last Night" (1977) 



Supermarltet 



Looney 



Shop-Drop 



LooneL 



Murder. She Wrote q 



U*V4 



**V2 "The Lover" (1992, Drama) Jane March. R 



Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 

AHen Natiai" (1988, Science Fictkw) James Caan. |*V; "Hot Times at Montclair High" (1989) 



*** 



**M? "Career 0(vortunities"'{^99^)Q 



BuHwinkle 



Unadved Mysteries 



Partridge I Get Smart 



L.A. Law 



Hugh Hefner: Once Upon a Time " (1992) 



"White Men Cant Jump" (1992) Woody Harrelson. 



Dragnet 



iBobNewhart IM.T. Moore 



** "Night Eyes ^"(1991, Suspense) R' 



M.T Moore 



**V2 'JeatoosK"(1984, Drama) Angle Dickinson. 



Van Dyke iLucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Night Rhy." 



Bikini 2" 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteries 



SATURDAY EVENING OCTOBER 2. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



••* '"Ghostbusters" {\9M, Comedy) Bill Murray. PG' q 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



*** "Hot Shots!" (1991) Charlie Sheen. 



(3:30) College Football: Notre Dame at Stanford. (Live) q 



This Is Nigel jPro Beach Volleyball: Invitational 



(3:00) Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. 



(3:00) Major League Baseball: Teams to Be Announced. 



(3:00) Smokey-Bandit [Baywatch "Lover's Gov? 



News 



News 



Newsq 



NBC News 



CBS News 



CBS News 



Ster Trek: Next Gener. 



Newsq 



This Is Nigel |Pro Beach Volleyball: Invitational 

(3:00) **'; Little Murders "\**V2 "The Black tV/ntfm/y/"(1974) Michael Caine 



NBC News 



PG' 



Horse R. [Senior PGA GoH: Vantage Champ. -■ Second Round 



The Substitute' (1993, Suspense) Amanda Donohoe. q [Major Dad q 



(3:30) "Police Acad. 6" 



(3:00) "Father of the Bride" 



Can't on TV Arcade 



* "Ladybugs" (1992) Rodney Dangerfleld. 



Sportscenter 



Wings q 



News 



Night Court 



7:30 



SporteOuit 



Court TV 



Wh. Fortune 



Untouchables (In Stereo) q 



Crusaders 



Ster Trek: Deep Space 9 



Jeopardy! q [Wh. Fortune 



8:00 I or 



9:00 



*•• "Under S>ege "(1992) Steven Seagal. 



9:30 



Beverly H. 



*»* Beverly Hills Cop "(1984, Drama) Eddie Murphy, q 



Mommies q [Cafe Ame. 



Medicine Woman 



Medicine Woman 



Copsq 



Mommies q 



***V2 "The Wiki One" {^954, Drama) 



Cops (R) q 



Cafe Ame. 



Short Sub. 



Empty Nest [Nurses q 



Harts of the West q 



Harts of the West q 



Front Page (In Stereo) q 



Empty Nest [Nurses q 



10:00 



Crypt Tales 



10:30 



Comnwshq 



Crypt Tales 



Sisters (In Stereo) q 



Walker, Texas Ranger q 



Walker, Texas Ranger q 



Comic Strip: Late Night 



Sisters (In Stereo) q 



Football [College Football: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



**V; "Things Are Tough All Over" (1982) Cheech Marin 



11:00 



Crypt Tales 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



11:30 



12:00 



"New Jack City" (\B9\) "R" 



Golden Girls [Empty Nest 



Saturday Night Live 



Ster Trek: Deep Space 9 



Untouchables (In Stereo) q 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) q [Music 



News q [Saturday Night Live 



Football Scoret>oard 



*•* "tVtftow"' (1988) Val Kilmer. PG' 



Case Closed q 



*•'/; "Company 5us/ness "(^1991) Gene Hackman. 



* ""Buffy the Vampire Slayer" (1992) q 



Double Dare [Wild Side 



•** 



"Who Will Love My Children?" (1983) Ann-Margret. 



Salute 



[Legends 



*** "The Accused" (1988, Drama) Jodie Foster, q 



**• 



Doug 



"Ghostbusters' 09M, 



**V2 Necessary Roughness " (1991) Scott Bakula. q 



[Sportscenter [Baseball 



Silk Stelkings "Lady Luck " [•** ""A Nightmare on Elm Street" (1984) 



[Rugrate 



Comedy) Bill Murray. PG 



** "First Love" (1977, Drama) William Katt, Susan Dey. 



Clarissa 



Roundhouse 



•*• "The Last Boy Scout" 1991) Bruce vyillis. R" q [Softly-ParJs 



*• 'fla/s<n.q Cam "(1992) John LIthgow. [Drew Carey [Red Shoe 



Ren-Stimpy [You Afraid? 



*•* 



"'Monkey S/><nes "(1988, Hon-or) Jason Beqhe. 



•• 



'flaivA/erve"(1991)"R" 



Very Very Nick at NHe 



Hidden [Hidden 1 Unsolved Mysteries 



Superman 



China Beach 



SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 3. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 I STOO 



5:30 



«*• 



"Seems Like Old Times" (1980) Goldie Hawn. 'PG' 



**V2 "Money on the S/de "(1982) Karen Valentine. 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



••• "Doc HQ//twootf""(1991) Mk:hael J. Fox. 'PG-13' q 



Newsq 



ALF q I*** "The Great Santini" (1979, Drama) Robert Duvail 



ABC News 



NBC News 



NFL Football: Philadelphia Eagles at New York Jets. From Giants Stedium. (Uve) q 



NFL Football: Philadelphia Eagles at New York Jets. From Giants Stadium. (Uve) q 



*** "Agnes o^Gotf" (1985, Drama) Jane Fonda. 



**'/; "Gung Ho"" (1986, Comedy) Michael Keaton 



Ster Trek: Deep Space 9 



Newsq 



Short Sub. 



NASCAR 



•*• 



Warkxk' (1959, Western) Richard Widmark. 



Senior PQA QoW: Vantage Champtonship - Final Round 



(3:00) "No HokJs Barred" [Ninja Turtles [Ninja Turttes 



** ■Pont Tell Mom ffw Babysitters Dead" (1991) q 



•*• 



WarGames" (1983) Matthew Broderick. PG' 



Can't on TV lArcade 



iDouMe Dare IFreahmen 



**V2 "The Good Fight"' (1992, Drama) Christine Lahtl. 



Ninja Turttes 



NBC News 



Videos 



Am. Funniest 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) q 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) q 



Brisco County, Jr. 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



8:00 I 8:30 



**% "Traces o/f?ed "(1992 



James Belushi. 'R' q 



Lois > Clark-Superman 



Seaquest DSV "Games" q 



Murder. She Wrote q 



Murder. She Wrote q 



Martin q [UvSigSingte 



Seaqyst DSV "Games' q 



**'/^ •Internationa Velvet" (Wi, Drama) Tatum O'Neal. 'PG' 



Roast Vitete 



Ninja Turttes 



NFL 



TBaseboM Tonight 



**V^ "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" (1990. Adventure) 



Ready or Not 



Rocko's Lite 



Chris Cross 



Legends 



9:00 



9:30 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



**V2 "Innocent BkKd" (\^2, Horror) Anne Parillaud. R' 



'Empty Cradte" (1993. Drama) Kate Jackson, q 



Trouble Shooters: Trapped Beneath the Earth" (1993) q 



"River of Rage: The Taking of Maggie Keene" (1993) q 



River of Rage: The Taking of Maggie Keene" (1993) q 



Married.. 



Dearest 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



"Trouble Shooters: Trapped Beneath ffie Earth" (1993) q 



*** 



"G/K?stf»jstefs"'(1984, Comedy) Bill Murray. PG" 



Auto Racing: IndyCar - Monterey Grand Prix 



Case Ctosed (R) q 



** "Iron Eagle" (1986) Louis Gossett Jr.. 'PG-13' q [*** "Pate Rk)er" (1985, Western) Clint Eastwood. R' q 



*•• 



"City S//dcefS "(1991) Billy Crystel. 'PG-13 



You Afraid? I Roundhouse 



*• "'7?ie Rape of Dr. Willis" (1991, Drama) Jadyn Smith. 



Nick NewsjMork 



SHkStaikings (In Stereo) q 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Paid Prog. 



Newsq 



Cheeroq 



Cheersq 



Siskel 



Day In Country Music 



Paid Prog. 



Rescue 911 



12:00 



'To Protect" 



Dear John q 



Night Court 



Murphy B. 



FYlPItt 



Suspect 



♦*'/^ "For the Love of Mike" (1960) 



Sportscenter 



S«k Stelkhws "Lady Luck" 



**V2 "Heartbreak flK^o "(1986) Clint Eashwood. R' q 



Love Matters" (1993) Griffin Dunne. 
Lucy Show [Van Dyke IM.T. Mooro 



•••V^ "'A Cry in the Dark" (1988, Drama) Meryl Streep, Sam Neill. 



Comedy Chib AH-Stars VI 



Bob Newhart I Dragnet 



China Beach 



NFL 



Hollywood 



"Hostage" Q 



Psycho IV: The Beginning" 



A. Hitchcock [Superman 



Unsolved Mysteries 



MONDAY EVENING OCTOBER 4. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



(3:15) ***'/; "The Right Stuff" (1983, Drania) Sam Shepard. 'PG' q 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



Empty Nest [Cheers q 



Oprah Winfroy q 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry 



Copsq 



Tiny Toon 



Cur. Affair 



(2:30) "International Velvet" 



Max Out (R) 



Pyramid 



(2:30) 



Dwam Lg. 



Pyramid 



Newsq 



Coach q 



News 



Qeraldo 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Animaniacs [Batman q 



Newsq 



Newsq 



News 



News 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



*• "Airplane II: The Sequel 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



FuH House q 



*** "'G/)Osf&uste/-s"" (1984 



Newsq 



Roseanne q 



NBC News 



Chaltenge 



Pariter Lewis 



Max Out 



Comedy) Bill Murray. "PG" 



Facte of Ufa 



Th'breds 



Ninja Turttes 



•• "Masters o/ Menace" (1990) Catherine Bach. 'PG-13" 



Up Close 



Ninja Turtles 



Hard Copy q 



Jeopwdylq 



cop»g 



CBS News 



Roseanne q 



Jeopardy! q 



(1982) PG 



Ent Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married... 



Am.Joumal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



**V2 "Lonefy Haarte "(1991) Beverly DAngeto. R' q 



Day Or>eq 



Fresh Prince 



Shade 



Shade 



Btossomq 



Dave's 



Dave's 



lOKW 



10:30 



Trancers III: Deth Lives" q 



11:00 



BeveriyH. 



11:30 



12:00 



•V2 ""Killer Instinct" {m2) 



NFL FootbaH: Washington Redskins at Miami Dolphins. From Joe Robbie Stadium, q [News q 



'In the Shadows, Someone's Watching" (1993) q 



Murphy B. 



Murphy B. 



Love & War 



Love ft War 



•** "The Fabutous Baker Boys" (1989) Jeff Brklges 



Frosh Prince iBtossom q 



•* "LpyertWK "(1989) Patrick Dempsey. 'PG-13' 



Sportscenter 



Major Dad q 



NFL Prime Monday 



Wings q 



(3:30) **V2 "Zelly and Me" I**** "'The Treasure of the Sierra Madre" jWS) 



** "The Golden Chiki" (1986) "PG-13' 



Muppets [ Craty Kids I Hey Dude (R) [ Qute 



** "L/fterace"' (1988, Bk)graphv) Andrew Robinson. 



What You Do 



Supennaritet 



Looney 



Shop-Drop 



Murder. She Wrote q 



Northern Exposwe q 



Northern Exposure q 



Mama 



Mama 



"In the Shadows, Someones Watching" (1993) q 



*•* "Max Dugan Returns' 



Auto Racing: Lowes 150 



WWF: Monday Nitfrt Raw 



•* "Masters of Menace" (1990) Catherine Bach "PG-13 



•* "BoomefafH?" (1992, Corriedy) Eddie Murphy. R" q 



Looney 



BuHwinkte 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Partridge [Get Smart 



LA. Law "Bare Witness" 



1983) Jason Robards. PG' 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In Stereo) q 



Editton 



Chevy Chase Dan Aykoryd. 



Late Show q 



Love Con. 



News q [Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Drag Racing: NHRA Keystone Nationals. 



***% "The Right Sfuff" (1963) "PG" 



SHk Stelkings (In Stereo) q [Major Dad q 



Sportscenter 



Wings q 



** "Leprec/iaun' (1992) Wanwick Davis. 



**» "Coming to America" (1988) Eddie Murphy. 'R' q 



Dragnet 



[Bob Newhart [M.T Mooro 



•V; "The S/tencer" (1992) Lynette Walden. 



M.T Moon 



** 



"Nothing Personal" 1^990) DonakJ Sutheriand. 



Van Dyke [Lucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



OddCoupte 



"Harlem" 



Evil Spirits" 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteries 



TUESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 5. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(3:00) 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



** 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



Collision Course" {^%7) Jay Leno. q 



Empty Nest [Cheers q 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry Tmy Toon 



COELS- 



Cur. Affair 



(3:00) "Loverboy" {^9m 



Max Out (R) 



Pyromkl 



Droam Lg. 



Pyramid 



Newsq 



Coach q 



Newsq 



News 



Qeraldo 



Oprah Winfroy q 



Animaniacs 



Newsq 



Batman q 



•** "Max Dugan Returns" 



Chaltenge 



Pariter Lewte 



(3:45) **V; "Cadence" (1990) "PG-13' 



Max Out 



Facte of Life 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



**V2 '"Short Circuit" (1986, Comedy) Ally Sheedy. "PG 



Newsq 



News 



News 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



Full House q 



Roseanne q 



NBC News 



1983) Jason Robards. PG 



NBA Today 



>Hrtia Turttes 



UpCtose 



Ninja Turttes 



Hard Copy q 



Jeopardy! q 



Copsq 



CBS News 



Roseanne q 



Jeopardy! q 



Ent Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 
Maniad.. 



AmJoumal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



*** 



"Guns afBatas/" (1964 



Sportscenter 



Major Dad q 



*** 



Deception (1946, Drama) Bette Davis. 



**V; "Were No Angels" (1989) Robert De Niro. "PG-13' 



Muppete [CratyKids [Hey Dude (R) I Qute' 



** "Big GirisDont Cry... They Get Even' 



What You Do 



**V; "McQ" (1974, Drama) John Wayne. Eddie Alt)ert, Diana MuMaur. 



Looney 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



*** "Under Siege" (1992, Adventure) Steven Seagal. "R 



FuB House q 



Saved-Bell 



Phenom q Roseanne q 



Getting By q 



Lamxpiette 



Coachq 



Second HaH 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



11:30 



***^/2 "Boyz N the Hood" (1991) Cuba Gooding Jr.. R 



NYPDBIueq 



Major League Baseball Pteyoffs: ALCS Game 1. Teams to Be Announced 



(In Stereo) q 



Major League 



Rocq 



Saved-Bell 



BasebaH Pteyoffs: ALCS Game 1. Teams to Be Announced 



Bakersfiekl 



Getting By q 



America's Most Wanted q 



Laaroquette [Second Half 



Mama 



Mama 



DateSne (In Stereo) q 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Cheeraq 



12:00 



"Liguid Dm" 



NightHneq 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In Stereo) q 



Edition 



Chevy Chase 



fitewsq 



Pauly Shore. 



Richard Attenborough. [**** "Raging Bull" (1980, Bkxyaphy) Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci. R' 



NHL Hockey: Pittsburgh Penguins at Philadelphia Flyers. From the Spectrum. (Live) [Sportsnight 



Wings q 



Fav. Rims 



1992) PG 



BulwinUe 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Murder. She Wrote q 



[Boxing: Otis^ant vs. Willie Monroe. (Live) 



**V2 "Leather Jackets" (1990, Drama) R' I "Corse IV: The Ultimate Sacrifice" (1993) 



** "Iron Eagle" (1986) Louis Gossett Jr.. 'PG-13 



Partridge [Get Smart 



LA. L«w "Parent Trap" 



Dragnet [Bob Newtwrt 



Major D»lq 



Late Show q 



Love Con. 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



"How to Murder Your Wife' 



Sportscenter 



Wtogs q [Odd Coupte 



*• "Aces: Iron Eagle ///'"(1992) R' q 



**'/ii "T?w Lowf" (1992) Jane March. R' 



M.T. Moore M.T Moore 



** "Love and Betay^" (1989, Drama) Stetanie Powers. 



Van Dyke 



* "/nrwSancft/m" (1991) 



Lucy Show 



Unsolwd Mysteries 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteries 



WEDNESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 6. 1993 



2 *** "Defending Your Life" 



10 



Major League Baseball Pteyoffs: ALCS Ganw 2 
Major League BasebaB Pteyoffs: ALCS Ganrw 2 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



4:00 



4:30 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 
Empty Nest [Cheereq 



Tw" 



5:30 



1991) Albert Brooks. "PG" q 



Newsq 



Coachq 



Tom-Jerry 



coi»g 



Tiny Toon 



Cur. Affair 



(3:00) "Guns at Batasi 



Max Out (R) 



(3:05) 



Dream Lg. 



Animantecs [Batman q 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



♦** "Time After Time" {\979) Mateolm McDoweH. 'PG" 



Newsq 



News 



Newsq 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



cop«g 



FullHouaeq 



Roaeanneq 
NBC News 



*** "How to Murder Your Wife" (1965) Jack Lemmon 



Chalewge 



Parker Lewte 



Max Out 



Facte of Lite 



** "Memoirs of an Invisible Mar?" (1992) 



Nteja Turffes 



***V2 "Jezebel" (1938, Drama) Bette Davis 
iMupoete ICroivKids I Hey Dude (R) I Qute 



Inside PQA 



UpCtese 



NInte Turttes 



**• "Max Duoan flefums "(1963) Jason Robards. PG 



HardCopyq 



Jeopafdylq 



CBS News 



Ent Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



AmJoumai 



Merited... 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



***'/^ "The Waterdance (1992, Drama) Eric Stoltz. R' 



Thea q [Joe's Life q 



Unsolved Mysteries q 



Home Imp [^ace Under 



Now-T. Brokaw ft K. Couric 



10:00 



ftyptTates 



10:M 



Sandere 



Moon Over Miwwi q 



Dream Onq 



Law ft Order "Discord" q 



Major League Basebrf Pteyoffs: NLCS Game 1. Teams to Be Announced 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Garrw 1 . Teams to Be Announced 



Beverly Hite. 90210 q 



Now-T Brokaw ft K. Couric 



*»* "Fate Is the Hunter" (1964. Drama) Glenn Ford 



Sportscewter 



Major Dadq 



PBA Bowkng 



l^"^Q 



Naples Serwor Open. (Live) 



Murder. She Wrote q 



"To Die, To Steep" (1992, Dranw) NR 



What You Do [Looney Loeney 



Stories 



Place (In Stweo) q 



*** 



Mama 



|M«na 



Law ft Order "Discord " q 



""T?ie Buddy Ho»v SUxy" (1978) Gary Busey. "PC 



Boxing: Ray Mercer vs. Mart( WiMs. (Live) 



** "Parmng ffie Town" (1992) 



** SmHiette" {^990. Suspense) Fave Dunaway. q 



NR 



**V2 "Oggs<own"'(1992) James Woods 



Partridge [Get Smart [ Dragnet 



** "M^acie Bflac/i"J1992) Ami Dolenz. q 
Boms 



11:00 



ftewsq 



Itewsq 



11:30 



12:00 



"Single WfOe Female" "R 



Cheereq jNightHneq 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In 



E«tion 



Chevy Chase Gary Morris 



Stereo) q 



LateShowq 



Love Con. 



ITonight Show (In Stereo! 



*** "GorMlas in the Mist" (1988) PG 



jp^^OwW^w 



Major Dadq 



Sportacenter 



Wings q 



fi 



Auto Raring 



OddCoupte 



— -a- fc« * — -* 



** "Raising Cm" (19K) John Uthgow 



*V2 "Mffit Rhythms" (1992) Martin Hewitt 



M.T. Moore IM.T.Meow 



.A..A.U. "Cnai.o Trostu" M OAD fWsmat Timnthw rtalir 



VwDyke 



Terrmator 2" 



Lucy Show 






-i 



i 



.1 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



Page 11 



Lifestyle 



The Autumn Leaf Festival: 

Celebrating 40 years of festivities, food and fun 



by Amy Gerkin 
Lifestyles Editor 



Each year, thousands of resi- 
dents and visitors gather for the 
eight-day traditional Autumn 
Leaf Festival. This year, Clarion 
will be celebrating its 40th year 
of the annual festivities, starting 
October 2-10. 

The Autumn Leaf Festival has 
grown from a one-day parade 
event with a purely local interest 
to an eight-day fall-foliage 
extravaganza with visitors dri- 
ving from hundreds of miles. 

In 1954, the festival began dur- 
ing a "cracker-barrel" talkfest of 
young Clarion and professional 
men in the L & R Decorating 
Company's storeroom in Main 
Street. In this group were the 
late Russ Hepler, Jr., "Po" 
Haskell, Leon Hufnagel, Joe 
Schierberl and Don Stroup. 

Then someone mentioned the 
attraction of die autumn foliage 
displays around Clarion for 
tourists, and the Autumn Leaf 
Festival idea was bom. All that 
was needed was a Chamber of 
Commerce to make the festival 
work, and as a result, such an 
organization was formed. 

Serving as the first manager of 
the Chamber of Commerce, 
Harold A. Flick was assigned to 
organize the first fall festival the 
following October as a one-day 
event marked by a parade. 

As the years went by, the idea 
became so popular that the 



Autumn Leaf Festival expanded 
to three days, to five days, to a 
full week, and now eight days. 
Even though Flick left the 
Chamber of Commerce the day 
before the second annual festi- 
val. Gene McDonald took over 
and the festivities continued to 
grow. 

That year, the festival's sym- 
bol became a leaf-shaped figure 
called "ALF." By 1958, the fes- 
tival's fifth year, ALF had 
become so big and involving so 
many people that George Wolf 
was named the Chamber's first 
general chairman. 

State and national figures have 
come to Clarion to proudly ride 
in the parades, including a gov- 
ernor, senators, congressmen, 
state officials, noted athletes, 
beauty queens and big names of 
show business. These parades 
have grown from a few units to 
135 or more floats, bands, drill 
teams, marching units and cars 
bearing notables. 

Soon Clarion University (then 
Clarion State College) became 
involved in the festivities. 
Sororiues and fratemifies com- 
peted to create the most imagina- 
tive floats. Homecoming day 
became the climatic finish to the 
festival, with the parade and the 
CSC football game with the stu- 
dents' floats entering Memorial 
Stadium for a parade of their 
own. 

Each year the crowds increased 
so much that short-wave radio 




File photo 
The streets of Clarion will soon be filled with the sights, 
sounds and smells of the 40th annual Autumn Leaf 
Festival, October 2-10 



control and mini-u-ansit vehicles 
became essential for communi- 
cation. Though stale, county and 
local police appeared in num- 
bers, disorderly conduct was 
rare. 

However, traffic conu-ol and 



parking became a mammoth 
operation. Feeding the large 
crowds also became a problem, 
but easily solved by a produc- 
tion-line chicken barbeque. 

The Autorama became a new 
feature of ALF, where owners of 



antique and classic cars were 
invited to "show off their prized 
possessions. Every year Main 
Street is packed for blocks with 
cars worth millions of dollars. 
This year's Autorama is expand- 
ed to two days due to popular 
demand. 

Besides the Autorama and the 
rows of tempting, mouth-water- 
ing food, the carnival attracts 
many people, young and old. 
The thrilling rides and game 
booths are provided by J & J 
Amusements. 

This year, the Autumn Leaf 
Festival will feature the 
Pennsylvania-Iowa Percherons- 
Ertyl Draft Horse Hitch spon- 
sored by the Clarion Animal 
Hospital. This six black 
Percheron wagon team, owned 
by Jim Mays and driven by Karl 
Haglund, will lead Saturday's 
parade. 

Once paid for by local conu-i- 
butions, AI.F had become so big 
that various concessions and the 
Souvenier Program supported by 
advertising have been involved 
to help decrease the project's 
expen.ses. This year's title spon- 
sor is Integra Bank, along with 
Franklin Bottling Company and 
Bell of Pennsylvania. 

Volunteers have also helped 
the fesuval immensely to make 
each year's spectacle bigger, bet- 
ter and more attractive. The 
enfire Clarion community gets 
involved to work together to 
make ALF better each year. 



Local studen ts compete for Miss Teen ALF/ Miss Clarion County 



by Amy Gerkin 
Lifestyles Editor 



One of the main attractions to 
this year's Autumn Leaf FesUval 
is the Miss Teen ALF and Miss 
Clarion County Scholarship 
Pageant. 

Several young women, includ- 
ing six university contestants 
will be competing for the various 
prizes and awards. 

Sponsoring this year's Miss 
Clarion County Scholarship 
Pageant is Caroline Rearick, 
Independent Sales Director for 



Mary Kay Cosmetics. 

The Miss Clarion County 
Scholarship Pageant is a local 
preliminary to the Miss PA 
Scholarship and Miss America 
Scholarship Pageants. This 
year's pageant promises to be a 
musical, exciting and multi- 
dimensional show, with a well- 
qualified panel of judges. 

The contestants will be judged 
according to swim suit, talent, 
individual interview, evening 
wear and poise and appearance 



on stage. 



In addition to desig- 



nating Miss Clarion County, 
prizes will also be awarded to 
the first and second runners-up. 
All prizes and awards will be in 
the form of scholarship monies. 
Miss Clarion County will repre- 
sent our area in the Miss PA 
Scholarship Pageant in June, and 
then on to Miss America in 
September. 

Sponsoring this year's Miss 
Teen Autumn Leaf is the Uppers 
and Downers Boutique shop. 
Like the Miss Clarion County 
pageant. Miss Teen ALF will be 



competing in front of a panel of 
judges according to talent, indi- 
vidual interview, evening wear 
and poise and appearance on 
stage. 

In addition to the crowning of 
Miss Teen ALF, prizes will also 
be awarded to the first and sec- 
ond runners-up and Miss 
Congeniality. 

Ccmtestants will be competing 
from various counties, including 
Clarion, Venango, Jefferson, 
Forest, Butler and Armstrong. 
Any student from those counties 



between the ages of 17 and 24 
are eligible. 

The Miss Clarion County 
Scholarship and Miss Teen 
Autumn Leaf Pageants will be 
held consecutively at the 
Redbank Valley High School 
auditorium on Saturday, October 
9. The doors will open at 7 p.m. 
and the curtain rises at 7:30 p.m. 
General seating is $6 and 
reserved seats are $8. 

The Talent Search will be 
Tuesday, October 5 at 7 p.m. at 
the Clarion Area High School. 



»»^ •.»,•*, ■. , 



mmmmi'm 



mm 



Page 12 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



Young artist depicts racial and cultural identity 



Pagel3 



fl 



e \\ s 



r 



by Crystal Janis 
Lifestyles Writer 



Kristine Yuki Aono was the 
first artist to break the seal of a 
series of programs that Clarion 
University will be hosting called 
"Minority Women Scholars: 
Toward 2000." Yuki Aono visit- 
ed Hart Chapel last night at 7 
p.m., presenting a lecture and 
slide show of her art. A recep- 
tion for all at the Women's 
Studies Center in Harvey Hall 
completed the evening. 

Yuki Aono is a third genera- 
tion Japanese-American. She 
received her B.F.A. degree from 
Washington University, St. 
Louis, Missouri. She also 
received her M.E. from the 
Skowhegan School of Painting 
and Sculpture, Skowhegan, 
Maine. 

Yuki Aono was born in 
Chicago, Illinois and is currently 
living in Cheverly, Maryland. 
Yuki Aono gets to travel a lot 
with her work. She has covered 
a broad geographical area, dis- 
playing art exhibitions at San 
Antonio, Texas, Richmond, 
Virginia, Washington D.C., 



Tokoma Park, Maryland, and St. 
Louis, Missouri. 

Yuki Aono's art reflects highly 
controversial issues. "Racial and 
cultural identity are strong 
themes throughout my work," 
she states. "I address in my art 
such issues as acculturation, 
racial and sexual stereotyping, 
the Japanese-American inter- 
ment camps and topics associat- 
ed with cultural interfacing." 

"My art begins as a thematic 
concept with a specific story to 
tell," she continues. "Choice of 
material, process and format are 
determined by the ideas them- 
selves. Thus, the final woric may 
result in various media and 
forms." 

Being very thorough in her 
work, Yuki Aono digs deep 
through mounds of information 
in order to capture the desired 
message of her art. It is not a 
matter of having a dream or feel- 
ing a sensation that first moti- 
vates her to produce a work. 

Yuki Aono states, "The 
process of creating an artwork is 
important to me. Research such 
as reading books, searching 
dirough the National Archives in 






g) » l » i m p ir »« m ill |» ii ■rii(| l ii lp l« >r ii|« H 



•M|«I|>M#»«P>< 







University relations photo 
Artist Kristine Yuki Aono, third generation Japanese-American 
presented a lecture and slide show of her work last night. 



Washington, D.C. and discover- 
ing family histories are all part 
of my process. My hope is that 
the final piece becomes an art- 
work which promotes under- 
standmg with visual integrity." 



Comic book writers to appear in Clarion 



With this understanding of her 
work in mind, Yuki Aono is just 
a glimpse of what the Women's 
Studies program is trying to 
implement this year. Her 
appearance was sponsored by the 



State System of Higher 
Education Chancellor's Office 
Social Equity Grant obtained by 
Deborah King, director of 
Women's Studies at Clarion 
University. Dr. Katheryn 
Graham, chair of the Women's 
Studies advisory committee, 
assisted King in this action. 

Explaining their plan a little 
further, King states, "This pro- 
ject will assist the infusion of 
scholarship by and about women 
from under represented equity 
groups into study at Clarion 
University. It will do so through 
visits of four minority women 
scholars to the university 
through public presentations by 
the scholar, through meetings of 
the scholar with faculty, admin- 
istration and the students." 

Following this schedule, Yuki 
Aono visited several classes dur- 
ing her visit at Clarion. Some 
faculty members had the oppor- 
tunity of dining with her, and 
including one of her presenta- 
tions as a highlight. Yuki Aono 
also attented a luncheon with 
Asian members of the universi- 
ty's faculty and students. 



by John Martinec 
Lifestyles Writer 



Comic Books 101 is celebrat- 
ing its one-year anniversary here 
in Clarion. To commemorate 
tJiis occasion, owner Bill Wieder 
has invited three comic book 
writers to his shop. Bill 
Spangler and the husband-wife 
team of Tom and Mary 
Bierbaum will meet and speak 
about their careers in comics on 
Saturday, October 2 from 12 
noon to 5:30 p.m. 

Bill Spangler of Warminster 
has sold over 90 comic strips 
over the past six years. Some of 
the comics include Alien Nation, 



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Free pregnancy test 
Confidential 
Counseling 



AAA PREGNANCY 
CENTER 

ior appointment call: 
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tpen Mon.-VVed.-Fri. 10-2 
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Tom Corbett, Space Cadet and 
Quantum Leap. Some of his 
more current works include 
Robotech: Invid War, Robotech: 
Return to Macross and 
Argonauts: System Crash. 
System Crash is a revival of a 
comic publishers by Eternity 
Comics in 1988-89. This two- 
issue pulp-style adventure is 
similar to Doc Savage or 
Buckaroo Banazi. 

Tom and Mary Bierbaum of 
Erie met through their mutual 
interest of comics which led 
them working regularly as 
scripters for four years. Their 
current projects include 
Legionnaires for DC and Dead 
Kid for Sky Comics. 
Legionnaires is a recently 
launched series starring 30th 
century teen-age superheroes 
who are trying to put back the 
pieces of a shattered Earth. 



Dead Kid is a new project 
alx)ut a cool teen-age hero who 
just happens to be a corpse. 
Other works of the Bierbaum' s 
include DCs Legion of Super- 
Heroes, The Heckler, Secret 
Origins and Elvira's House of 
Mystery, Evolutions' s Green 
Ghost and Lotus, Disney's Chip 
'n Dale's Rescue Rangers, and 
DeLuxe's Wally Wood's 
Thunder Agents. 

Weider started this business a 
year ago in pursuit of a dream he 
had in the back of his mind. 
That dream was to one day be 
involved in the comic book 
world. He did this by opening 
his store on 15 South Avenue 
which he would like to consider 
a friendly store where every cus- 
tomer is important. 

Weider also feels that his store 
fills a need in Clarion for people 
who enjoy comic books. 




Images of the West 
Just Arrived! 

A new shipment of 

Mexican Blankets 



Jamie Shropshire 

Owner 



625 Main Street 

Clarion, PA 16214 

814/226-5513 



The John Keats Poetry Prize 
College and University Competition 

Established in 1989» The John Keats poetry prize of 
$100 is open to any student of an American college 
or university. 

Sponsored by Mr. Dominic Tomassetti, editor and 
publisher. 

This competition is to encourage education* criticism 
and writing of poetry. 

CONTEST RULES 

Submission deadline is November 1, 1993. 
Noti0cation is November 15, 1993. 

Open to any original previously unawarded poem of 
any length, style or theme. No entry limit, purchases 
to make or application process. 

Manuscripts may be typed or legibly handwritten 
copies with name and address included. 

Send $4 with SASE for notification to: 

Award Director Dominic J. A. Tomassetti 

New American Poets, The Keats Prize 

1 120 Simmontown Road 

Gap, PA 17527 





LSHIRE'S 



90 Merle Street 
Chirion, Pa 16214 

/», *jiM^ (814) 226-7070 

flowers <y ytfts j. 800-833-3571 



v^^Zlg^J^ 



1^ 



i 



i ii 



e 




by Chuck Shepherd 



-Gary T. Williams, 38, pleaded 
guilty to forgery in Louisville, 
Ky., in August, involving checks 
totaling more than $4,800. 
Williams told the judge that he 
needed the money badly to pay 
off a man who had just threat- 
ened his life in the group house 
in which he was staying. 
Williams said it all started when 
he fried some chicken gizzards 
using what he thought was flour; 
it was actually the other man's 
cocaine. 

-Hermosa Beach, Calif., City 
Councilman Bob Benz helped 
run this year's annual July 
Fourth "Ironman" competition, 
which requires contestants to run 
a mile, paddle a surfboard a 
mile, and then down a six-pack 
of beer without vomiting. Benz 
was co-producer of a video of 
the event that aired on local 
cable TV and featured contes- 
tants for the "most picturesque 
vomiting" award. Ironman was 
held over to nearby homes, 
whose owners complained of 
contestants' publicly urinating. 
Said Councilman Benz," I had a 



great time. 

-Washington state Rep. Ron 
Jacobsen inuoduced a resolution 
in February calling for the 
appoinunent of a state poet lau- 
reate "to write poetry and lofty 
expressions to be read at appro- 
priate state occasions." The state 
wine industry would pay the lau- 
reate' s salary: 126 gallons of 
wine a year. 

-A March Associated Press 
roundup of bills introduced in 
state legislatures included an 
attempt in Maine to outlaw elec- 
tronic moose calls; a proposal in 
Minnesota to permit tavern cus- 
tomers to roll dice (without vio- 
lating anti-gambling laws) to see 
who pays the tab; and a Florida 
proposal to require a man who 
has extramarital sex to register 
with the state in order to pre- 
serve parental rights he may 
have to any offspring. 

-Pheonix New Times, covering 
a human-branding demonstration 
at a downtown art gallery in 
August by "body artist" Steve 
Haworth, reported that a 38- 
year-old female sought 
Haworth's services, intending to 



have her S&M master's three 
initials burned into her buttocks 
with stainless steel at 1,800 
degrees Farenheit. However, 
after one initial, she called it off 
because of the pain, scrapped the 
second initial altogether, and 
said she'd add the last if the cou- 
ple stayed together a year. 

-After a month-long investiga- 
tion, police in Lakewood, Colo., 
announced in August that the 
100-plus bullet firings that had 
frightened neighbors into believ- 
ing that gangs were engaged in 
drive-by shootings in the area 
were actually caused by the poor 
aim of employees at the nearby 
federal prison facility firing 
range. According to a prison 
spokesman, all employees, 
including clerical personnel, 
must be trained in Hrearms, and 
some apparently missed not only 
the targets but a large hill that 
separates the range from the 
complaining neighborhood. 

-Sheriff's deputies near 
Cudahy, Wis., arrested Michael 
Foster, 21, and a companion, 17, 
in April and charged them with 
theft of a large electronic dart- 



game machine from a bar. 
When the heavy machine in the 
back of the boys' pickup truck 
caused it to sink into the mud in 
the tavern's parking lot, one of 
the boys called the sheriff to ask 
for a tow. Said sheriffs Lt. Jim 
Paape, "They didn't put a real lot 
of thought into this." 

-Kansas City, Mo., police 
reported that two music store 
break-ins over Memorial Day 
weekend netted the thieves near- 
ly 1,000 empty CD boxes. They 
apparently thought they were 
stealing CDs, but the stores are 
among a growing number that 
remove the CDs themselves for 
safekeeping while displaying the 
boxes. 

-In April a Penn State 
University woman complained to 
local police in State College, Pa., 
that she had been ripped off. 
She said she had given a fellow 
student a $1,200 stereo to take an 
exam for her, but that he had 
flunked it and now wouldn't 
return her stereo. Buying acade- 
mic work is illegal in 
Pennsylvania. 

-In March in Houston, 
Humallah Mendenhall, 18, to 
obtain the local Crimestoppers 
cash reward, told police that his 
colleague, David Clyde Spencer, 
18i, had murdered a convenience 
store clerk a few days before. 
Evidently, Mendenhall failed to 
realize that, when arrested 



Spencer would turn him in, too, 
because Mendenhall allegedly 
drove the getaway car for the 
murder, and had allegedly com- 
mitted another murder two 
months earlier. 

-Accused drug dealer Alfred 
Acree bolted from police in 
Charles City, Va., in April on a 
Saturday night and took off in 
the dark through the thick 
woods. However, police tracked 
him down easily because he was 
wearing new L.A. Gear athletic 
shoes containing small, battery- 
operated lights that light up each 
time the heel is pressed. Said 
sheriff's investigator Anthony 
Anderson, "Every time he took a 
step, we knew exactly where he 
was." 

-Police in Cedarbury, Wis., 
arrested a 24-year-old man in 
September and charged him with 
robbing a Hardee's restaurant. 
He left with $650 but made two 
crucial mistakes. First, he 
parked his getaway car in the 
middle of the drive-by. Then, 
before entering the Hardee's, he 
used the men's room in the gas 
station next door and, as he dis- 
covered when he got back into 
his getaway car after the rob- 
bery, left the keys in the 
restroom. Police arrived before 
he could retrieve them. 

-(c)1993 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



Clarion University Broadcasting ready for new fall season 



by Toni Ross 
Lifestyles Editor 



Clarion University Broad- 
casting's TV-5 continues another 
busy season of broadcasting. 
This station, better known as 
TV-5 is a student-operated orga- 
nization which provides hands- 
on experience in broadcasting. 

Joseph Rainey, station man- 
ager, is really excited about the 
new season. He believes shows 
such as TV-5 News and Talk 
Around Town will give more of 
a community feel to TV-5. 

Rainey also noted the large 
number of freshman that will be 
working at TV-5 this year. 
Approximately 35 freshman 
from different majors will be 
starting their broadcasting 
careers. 

This year, TV-5 will be offer- 
ing a variety of programs which 
are available through Clarion 
TCI Cable. One of thes6 pro- 
grams is TV-5 News which airs 
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. and 
Fridays at 10 p.m. This half- 
hour news program offers in- 
depth news coverage of people 
and events in Clarion County. 



Regular sports updates and a 
wide variety of information will 
also be available. 

Clarion Hot Trax returns Uiis 
year to provide some of the 
hottest new music to viewers. 
In addition to alternative music. 
Hot Trax offers Rock News and 
exclusive interviews with 
today's hottest rock acts. Hot 
Trax airs Mondays through 
Thursdays. 

City Beat offers a funky mix of 
R & B, Reggae and rap music 
videos. Airing daily. City Beat 



also offers news and updates on 
urban and contemporary per- 
formers. 

If you like to watch a sports 
game live, but don't like dealing 
with the crowds, then Live 
Sports is die show for you. Live 
Sports features live coverage of 
local high school and university 
sporting events. 

This year Sports Center 5 will 
take on more of a news report 
feel. This show complements 
TV-5 News and Live Sports with 
a wide variety of special reports. 



Sports Center 5 will offer game 
analysis and in-depth interviews 
with the people who make the 
games happen. 

Talk Around Town is a weekly 
program that focuses on issues 
that affect Clarion residents. 
This show's format allows for 
panel discussions on topics that 
may range from date rape to die 
environment. 

TV-5 Special Features will be 
bringing special events into your 
living rooms for the second con- 
secutive year. Special shows 



planned for airing this year 
include the ALF parade, the 
Pennsylvania Senate report and 
Clarion Borough Council meet- 
ings. All air dates for Special 
Features are to be announced. 
The Clarion Borough Council 
meetings will be aired the first 
Tuesday of each month. The 
1993 ALF parade will be broad- 
casted live on Saturday. October 
9 at 12 p.m. 



1 



MEN'S FLOOR HOCKEY 
LEAGUE NOW FORMING 

You Form Your Own Team 
You Get Your Own Sponsor 

Call McDonald's For Information 

Package 

226-4072 

Played on Sunday's at Sligo Rec Center 

Mid October '93 Thru Feburary V4 



Stehle's 

Mini-storage 

3 miles from CUP - Intersection 322 & 66 
Shippenville, PA 16254 

5'x7'space - $26.50 per month 
5'xlO' space - $31.80 per month 

Deposit required - Larger spaces available 
Access 7 days a week 

NEWLY INSTALLED SECURITY GATE 

Phone (814) 226-9122 



Page 14,, 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



1993 Autumn Leaf Festival Schedule of events 1993 



>.: ; ' J » » * .' 

Page 15 



*i 



Week-Long Events 



ART SHOW: The Bi 

County Artists Association's 
35th Annual AI.F Art Show will 
be open to all artists 18 years or 
older in categories of painting, 
sculpture, photography and 
crafts. The show opens 8 p.m. 
Wednesday with professional 
critique and continues from 9 
a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday through 
Saturday and 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. 
on Sunday. Entry forms are 
available at the Chamber office. 
There is a $2 donation for cri- 
tiques and entry for the show is 
free. For more information, call 
the Chamber office at 226-9161. 

CARNIVAL: If you are 

ready for fun, come down and 
visit the ALF carnival. Try our 
thrilling rides and gjune booths 
by J & J Amusements. The car- 
nival starts Sunday, October 2 at 
the Courthouse, and will contin- 
ue through Sunday, October 10. 

CONCESSIONS: When 
you are hungry or looking for a 
souvenir, our tempting conces- 
sion stands will be waiting for 
you. New this year are buffalo 
wings, assorted cheesecakes and 
Belgium waffle sundaes. 
Located in Memorial Park and 
along Main Street, the stands 
feature a wide variety of food 
and keepsakes. 

CLARION COUNTY 
HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
MUSEUM: The Clarion 
County Historical Society 
Museum will be opened during 
the following dates and hours: 
Sunday, October 2, Tuesday, 
October 5 through Friday, 
October 8 and Sunday, October 
10 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. each 
day. 

AIRPLANE RIDES: The 

Clarion County Airport will be 
offering sightseeing tours 
throughout the week of ALF. 
For more information on depar- 
ture times or to arrange rides, 
call 226-9993. 

SOUVENIRS AND 

INFORMATION: 

Information is offered at the 
Chamber of Commerce located 
at 41 South 5th Avenue. 
Souvenirs can be found at 
Memorial Park across from the 
Chamber of Commerce building. 



AIRSTREAM TRAILER 
SPECIAL EVENTS 
RALLY: Located at Penn 
Wood Airstream Park, home of 
the Pennsylvania Unit of 
WBBCI, Inc., Box 7, Limestone, 
PA 16234. For more informa- 
tion, call 764-8963. 



Friday, October 1 



lOTH ANNUAL ALF 
OPEN TENNIS TOUR- 
NAMENT: (Also Saturday 
and Sunday, call for times.) This 
event will be held at the CUP 
tennis courts from 5 p.m. to 10 
p.m. A $10 fee will be charged 
for the first event and $5 for the 
second event. Pre-registration is 
required. For more information, 
call 226-2248 or 226-5098. 



Saturday, October 2 



FARMERS MARKET: In 

Memorial Park, from 8:30 a.m. 
until early afternoon. 
Participants are welcome. 

GOLF TOURNAMENT: 

This four-man amateur scramble 
will be at Mayfield Golf Course 
with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. All 
players must have a certified 
handicap of 10 or above. There 
is a registration fee of $180 per 
team. Call 226-8888 for details. 

SPORTS CARD SHOW: 

(Also Sunday) Buy-Sell-Trade 
at over 30 tables at the Clarion 
Mall from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 
Former Clarion resident and 
Florida Marlins, Brad Frazier, 
will be signing autographs from 
1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Former 
Pittsburgh Steeler Jack Lambert 
will be also be signing auto- 
graphs on Sunday from 1 p.m. to 
3 p.m. 

FLEA MARKET: (Also 
Sunday) Located at Anchor 
Village from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., 
this scenic setUng served as a 
Natural Gas Pump Station in the 
early 1900s. Applications are 
available at the Chamber of 
Commerce office. 

HISTORIC HOUSE 

TOUR EMBROIDERY 

AND QUILT EXHIBIT: 

(Also Sunday) The proceeds to 
this event will benefit SAFE 
(Stop Abuse For Everyone). 
Tours will be held from 1 p.m. to 
5 p.m. Call 226-8481 for 
details. 



Sunday, October 3 



MELLON BANK 

AUTORAMA: Streets will 
be closed to traffic from 8 a.m. 
to 4:45 p.m. for the Main Street 
Autorama, from 4th to 8th 
Avenue. Show car parking is 
from 9 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Pre- 
registration is required, and cars 
will not be registered or accepted 
on show day. For more details 
on this antique and classic car 
display, call 226-9161. 

PIZZA HUT JUNIOR 
OLYMPICS: This event will 
be at Memorial Stadium for all 
children ages 5 to 12 years, 
grades K through sixth. A $2 
entry fee and pre-registration is 
required. Entry forms are avail- 
able at the Clarion County ele- 
mentary schools. Starting time 
is 1 p.m. Awards will be given. 

UNITED WAY OF 
CLARION COUNTY 
lOK RACE AND 3M 
WALK-A-THON: This 
event will kick off ALF and the 
Junior Olympics. The race and 
walk-a-thon starts at 12:45 p.m. 
at Memorial Stadium. For more 
information call 226-8760. 

CLARION MODEL 
RAILROAD CLUB 
DISPLAY: (Also Thurday 
through Sunday) This model 
railroad display will be in the 
Clarion Masonic Lodge Building 
on Main Su^et. Admission is S 1 
for adults and $.50 for childeren 
12 and under. 



AUTUMN LEAF 

SQUARE DANCE: Swing 
your partner to the Kalyumet 
Campgrounds on Clarion-Scotch 
Hill Road, Route 68 East. 
Callers will be Pat Castro an 
Tom Mohney. For $8 a couple 
there will be dancing, door 
prizes and refreshments from 2 
p.m. to 5 p.m. 

FLY-IN/DRIVE-IN: 

Sponsored by the Allegheny 
Mountains Experimental Aircraft 
Association Chapter 994, this 
event will be held from 9 a.m. to 
5 p.m. 

GOLF TOURNAMENT: 

This four-man scramble will be 
held at Mayfield Golf Course 
with a 10 a.m. shotgun start. 
Registration is $220 per team. 



Monday, October 4 



MISS TEEN ALF 
PAGEANT: Held at the 
Redbank-Valley High School 
from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., young 
women will be competing for the 
Miss Teen ALF crown. Tickets 
are on sale at the Clarion Area 
Chamber of Commerce for $6 
and $8, 

MISS CLARION COUN- 
TY SCHOLARSHIP 
PAGEANT: Young women 
will be competing for the Miss 
Clarion County title. Tickets are 
on sale at the Chamber of 
Commerce building for $6 and 
$8. This event will be held at 
Redbank-Valley High School 
from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. 



Tuesday, October 5 



CLARION CARE CEN- 
TER VARIETY SHOW- 
CASE: Cerfificates and 
medals will be awarded at the 
Clarion Area High School 
Auditorium at 7 p.m. Tickets are 
on sale at the Chamber of 
Commerce or at the door for $3. 

WTAE "OUR TOWN" 
FILMING: Paul Long and 
Yvonne Zanos from Pittsburgh's 
WTAE Channel 4 will be arriv- 
ing at 1 1 a.m. to film Clarion and 
the Autumn Leaf Festival, for 
the Wednesday 6:00 broadcast of 
the WTAE news feature "Our 
Town." 

KIDDIES PARADE: 

Line-up begins at 5:30 p.m. in 
the Integra Bank parking lot for 
all children in grades K through 
6. Pre-registration is required 
and the parade begins at 6 p.m. 
Registration forms are available 
at the Chamber of Commerce 
and McDonalds. This event is 
free and sponsored by the 
Clarion Area Jaycees, Clarion 
County Humane Society and 
McDonalds. The raindate is 
Thursday, October 7. 

FREE SCREENING OF 
PRE-SCHOOL CHIL- 
DREN: Free speech, lan- 
guage, hearing, general develop- 
ment and vision screenings will 
be held in front of the Clarion 
Courthouse from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 
Appointments are appreciated. 



; part o( the CLARION AREA 




POINTS OF Mf ACTivrry •: 

A Clanon Mall 

B Maylieid Golf Course 

C Holiday Inn (wim Tounst in- 

loomlion Boolh) 

Knighls Inn and Days 

Inn 
Straitan Homes 
All Clanon Co Airport 

PW Penn Wood Airslream INTERSTATE 80 EXITS 9 AND 10 will be the most congested on 

Oct 12 ai)d 13 Ccnsidf;' using EXITS 7, 8. or 11 when arriving in or 






LOCATIOM Of ALf 
SCHEDUU SPONSORi 
CH Clarion Hospital 
McO McDonald's 



Pari- 



VVcdnesdav, October 6 



SIDEWALK SALES: The 

streets of downtown Clarion will 
be filled with merchandise frcxn 
the stores firom 9 a.m. to dusk. A 
free shuttle bus service provided 
by County Trails Bus Lines will 
run between downtown Clarion 
and the Clarion Mall. 

FIRE TRUCK RIDES: 

Always a hit, the Clarion Fire 
and Hose Company No. 1 will 
depart from the Fire Hall from 6 
p.m. to dusk for free rides fcH* all 
ages. 

STRATTAN BUILDING 
SYSTEMS: There will be 
morning tours of the Knox plant. 
Parking space is available. For 
more information call 797- 1 1 1 5 . 

FREE HEALTH FAIR: 

Klingensmith's Health Care will 
offer tests on pulse and blood 
pressure checks, cholesterol 
screening, hearing testing and a 
scheduling of mammography 
from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m. 

CLARION MALL 

CRAFT SHOW: (Also 
Thursday through Saturday) 
Over 40 crafters will display 
their works at the Clarion Mall. 

DINOSAUR LEGENDS: 

(Also Thursday and Friday) The 
Rockin' and Rappin' Reptile 
Show will be appearing at the 
Clarion Mall. This new action- 
packed show features such 
dinosaur legends Dyno-Dude, 
Dyper-Dude, Sporlucus and 
Sheetah. Call for times at 226- 
5180. 



Thursday, October 7 



TCI TEEN DANCE: The 

tentative location for the TCI of 
Pennsylvania Teen Dance is on 
Main Street in front of the 
Courthouse from 8 p.m. to 1 1 
p.m. C-93 will provide the 
music and any information on 
changes due to any inclement 
weather. 

CLARION HOLIDAY 
INN KARAOKE NIGHT: 

In conjunction with the Teen 
Dance, this event will tentatively 
lake place in front of the 
Courthouse on Main Street from 
8 pjn. to 11 p.m. 



« Keystone High School leaving the Clanon Area 



Friday, October 7 



FARMERS AND 

CRAFTERS DAY: 

Handmade and homemade 
crafts, goods and foodstuffs will 
be available for purchase at 
downtown Clarion from 6 a.m. 
until dusk. Pre-registration is 
required and the first 175 crafters 
are accepted. 

LC. GUILD CRAFT 
SHOW: This craft show will 
be held from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. at 
the I.e. Gymnasium on Main 
Street 

3RD ANNUAL QUAINT 
QUILT CREATIONS: 

(Also Saturday) Eight categories 
of beautiful quilted items will be 
on display to be judged and sold 
at the St. Joseph School, Route 
66 North, Lucinda. Doors open 
from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. An old- 
fashioned quilting bee will be in 
progress all day. Quilt supplies 
and lunch will be available for 
purchase. Admission is $1. 



Saturday, October 9 



BELL OF PENN^ 
SYLVANIA AUTUMN 
LEAF FESTIVAL 

PARADE: Bell of PA is the 
title sponsor to this special event. 
Leading the parade this year at 
12 noon on Main Street will be 
the the Pennsylvania-Iowa 
Percherons-Ertyl Draft Horse 
Hitch sponsored by the Clarion 
Animal Hospital. Marching 
units, colorful floats, specialty 
units, drill teams, Zem Zems and 
mwe will be participating in this 
annual crowd-gatherering event. 
Reserved seats for $3 are on sale 
at the Clarion Chamber of 
Commerce. A shuttle bus will 
be in service provided by County 
Trails from the Clarion Mall to 
downtown Clarion prior to the 
start of the parade. 

CUP HOMECOMING 
FOOTBALL GAME: The 

Clarion Golden Eagles will host 
Bloomsburg at 2 p.m. at 
Memorial Stadium. For more 
information call 226-1997. 

PANCAKE BREAK- 
FAST: "All-you-can-eat" pan- 
cake breakfast will be held at the 
Meisinger Center frwn 8 a.m. to 
11 a.m. Benefits go to the 
Immaculate Conception School. 



ANNUAL ANTIQUE 
FLEA MARKET: (Also 
Sunday) Furniture and farm 
related items and potpourri of 
anitques and collectibles vMl be 
on display and for sale at the 
Country Warehouse fi^om 9 a.m. 
until 5 p.m. This event is located 
off Exit 8 of 1-80, North 66, for 
3/4 miles. 



Sunday, October 10 



6TH ANNUAL BOWL- 
ING TOURNAMENT: 

Held at Ragley's Bowl-Arena, 
this handicap tournament will be 
open to men and women. An 
entry fee of $13 per person or 
$26 per team and pre-registration 
required. Squad times are 2 p.m. 




40th Annual Autumn Leaf Festival 

October 2-10. 199'i 



ALF 'SCOOT N* 
BOOTS" DANCE 

SHOW: Kick up your boots 
and participate and learn dances 
such as the Texas Two-Step, 
Cowgiri Boogie, "Sleezy" Slide 
and others at the Courthouse 
from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 



ALF "WOMEN IN THE 
90'S SHOWCASE: 

Discussions of women's con- 
cerns today will be presented at 
the Clarion Holiday Inn at 12 
noon. A $7.50 reservation fee 
per person is required. Call 226- 
7913 or 1-800-497-5703. 



TURKEY AND HAM 
SUPPER: Bring your 
appetite to this mouth-watering 
dinner sponsored by St. Joseph's 
Rosary Society at the St. 
Josephs's Center in Lucinda from 
4 p.m. to 7 p.m. 

BACK TO THE 50S 
WITH ELVIS: Elvis is alive 
and will be at the Clarion Mall. 
Actually, David Atkins will be 
performing as The King for 
shows at 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. 

CLARION MODEL 
RAILROAD CLUB DIS- 
PLAY: See listing for Sunday, 
October 2. Displays will be 
from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 

SILVERMOON RIDERS 
MOTORCYCLE SHOW: 

These members of the American 
Motorcyclists Association, 
which represents over 200,000 
motorcyclists throughout the 
U.S. will be appearing at the 
Clarion Mall from 12 noon to 5 
p.m. Pre-registration is from 9 
a.m. to 10 a.m. This event is 
open to all classes and makes of 
motorcycles, and is free and 
open to the public. 

SYRIA MOTOR 

CORPS: Precision ridings of 
Harley's, Honda's and small cars 
will be held at 2 p.m. at the 
Clarion Mall. 




File photo 
Elvis is alive and will be appearing once again at the Clarion Mali for shows at 1 and 3 p.m. 



Page 1^6 



The Ctarioii Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



^Pa^l7 



Entertainment 



THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 




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Creature Feature 



By D.H, Aarons 



Nicodemos the fruit bat trains to reach 
his lifelong dream of being a Vampire Bat. 



/Vou sure 
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The Dreaded 

RA"^ STEAK!! 



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by Bill Watterson 




THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
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6 Fruit drink 
9 Unhappy 

12 —You Glad 
You re You' 

13 Green fruit 

15 Weary 

16 "The — 
(Debbie 
Reynolds film) 

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19 Superlative 
suffix 

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23 Shed 

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another 

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62 Cupid ^ 

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c 1993 TriDun« Meoia Serv<es inc 
All Riqnis Reserved 



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2 Get up 

3 Actress Berger 

4 Sch sub| 

5 Sparing spender 

6 One-celled plant 

7 Force 

8 Big bird 

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35 Intimidate 

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42 Banks, at times 
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51 Prophets 

52 "My Friend — 

53 Debatable 

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59 — Yankee 
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The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



Page 19 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



Alcohol 101: Knowing now may save future problems 



by Melissa J. Caraway 
Ufestyles Writer 

lliose of you who were sober 
enough to read the headline are 
probably groaning loud enough 
for Bill Clinton to hear you, and 
are looking forward to rereading 
the News of the Weird. 

But if you are on campus on 
the weekends, you know that 
there are many students who 
have potential alcohol problems. 
The symptoms and behaviors 
can be as easy to read as acci- 
dents, fights and suicidal 
thoughts, to more vague signs 
like mood swings, missed classes 
and depression. 

Many students who frequently 
comsume large amounts of alco- 



hol don't know all the facts about 
the chemicals they are putting 
into their bodies. Nor do they 
realize the damage they are 
doing to the brain cells that 
affect their memories. 

In other words, those of you 
who are getting smashed, trashed 
and wasted off your barstools 
almost every day (especially dur- 
ing A1.F week) should listen up. 
These are some facts to use as a 
"chaser." 

No matter what anyone tells 
you, and just because you don't 
sniff it, smoke it or inject it, 
alcohol is still a drug and can be 
harmful when addictive. 

We all know people who used 
to go out partying every once in 
a while who now cannot get 



through the day without a "pick- 
me-up." This is a mistake within 
itself to think alcohol is an 
upper. All alcoholic beverages 
are depressants and will bring 
you down before it will pick you 
up. 

Another point to remember is 
that equal amounts of alcohol do 
not affect people in equal ways. 
Just because your best friend is 
about to begin his next six-pack 
does not mean that you'll be able 
to keep up with him. Remember 
many people die each year from 
alcohol poisoning or just plain 
drinking too much. 

Physical damages are not the 
only problems caused by over- 
drinking. Being drunk also caus- 
es a lack of control. Most sexual 



attacks occur when one or more 
parties are under the influence of 
alcohol. This reason alone 
should be enough to make us 
more responsible drinkers. 

If responsibility is not your 
thing then think about hang- 
overs. Even the word can strike 
terror in the heart, head and 
stomach of any heavy drinker. 

Despite popular opinion, alter- 
nating drinks or mixing drinks 
with a carbonated beverage 
instead of fruit juice will not 
make you any less drunk. You 
still have a good chance of 
"praying to the porcelain god" 
the next morning. No amount of 
coffee or cold water will save 
you from that feeling. 

There is also the campus alco- 



hol policy to remember. It is 
illegal to possess or use alcohol 
on campus, or sell to minors. 

Knowing several precautions 
and alternatives will help save 
you a lot of future trouble. 
Shutting yourself or a friend off 
will save you or them from 
crossing that line where lives can 
be lost. 

BACCHUS (Boosting Alcohol 
Conciousness Concerning the 
Health of University Students) is 
still on campus to prove you 
don't need alcohol to have a 
good lime. 

Have a safe ALF week and 
remember that too much of a 
good thing can wind up worse. 



Protection or prevention of learning from the classics 



by Ray Henderson 
Photography Editor 



The American Library associa- 
tion has designated the last week 
of September as "Banned Books 
Week '93 Celebrating the 
Freedom to Read." The entire 
week will be devoted to promot- 
ing awareness of bodes that have 
been banned in various areas of 
the United States. 

According to Julie Smith, pres- 
ident of the Clarion chapter of 
the Library Media Information 
Science Society, (Mie of the main 
goals of Banned Books Week 
*93 is to make known that "scwie 
people out there don't believe 



certain books fit, and they try to 
impose their own moral judge- 
ment on everyone else." 

Among the many books 
banned in the United States is 
Alice Walker's The Color 
Purple. This book was banned 
at the New Bern, North dlarolina 
High school because the main 
character is raped by her stepfa- 
ther. The book is currently being 
challenged in the Souderton, 
Pennsylvania Area School 
District "because it is smuL" 

Also on the list is the 
Illustrated Encyclopedia of 
Family Health. This text was 
challenged in an intermediate 
school library in Beaverton, 



Oregon, because of "explicit line 
drawings of sexual intercourse 
positions. The book was 
removed from the library 
shelves, but maintained "for staff 
use only." 

Perhaps the strangest case of 
book bannng on this year's list is 
Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451. 
This book was banned at the 
Venado Middle School in Irvine, 
California. The teook was 
banned because it "deals with 
bode burning and censorship." 

Smith believes that Banned 
Bodes Week plays a very impor- 
tant role in keeping people 
informed of their rights. 

"Book burning is a form of 



censorship," she said, "and I 
don't believe in that. I believe 
each person should choose for 
themself what is fit to read, and 
not try to make that decision for 
everyone else." 

Bode banning is a violation of 
the First Amendment of the U.S. 
Constitution which states: 
"Congress shall make no law 
respecting an establishment of 
religi(Hi, or prdiibiting tjie free 
exercise thereof; or abridging the 
freedom of speech, of the press, 
or the right of the people peace- 
ably to assemble, and to petition 
the government for a redress of 
grievances." 



William GoWing- 

John Steinbeck" Pf Mice and 
Men 

S£. Hinton -The Outsiders 

Roald Dahl- James and the 
riant Peach 



Alice WaPcer- The Color Purple 



mmmmmmmm 



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■ MM I M ' I ' ! '*******^^****^"^"****^***?^****^*^*^*^* 



%•'••' 



IJttiyersity Th^^^ 




Tickets available at: 

Gemmel Center 
mfomiation counter 



for mote info call: 



(81^226-2284 
9 am to 4 pm Mon-Fri 



Hart Chapel Theatre 

Oct. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9 

Curtain 800 pm 
Admission: $5 
(free for Clanon University Students w/ valid ID) 



pvOTawwvvt 



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Books to be banned in U.$.: 
Mark Twain-lluckld^eoxBnn 

Clyde Edgerton -The Floatplane 



Edward de Cirazia- Girls Le^n 
Back Everywhere 



Stephen King- Cujo 

Natbanial Hawthorne-The 
ggaylgttLgttgr 



Dee Brown— Bj 
Wounded Knee 



Katherine Paterson- 
J^rat>ithia 



JudyBlume--aifllto 

Shel SUveistein -A Ligjit in |h^ 

Maurice Sendak-1 



Mm 

ftay Bradbory-'FaiggBllHt#I 

IM American Hfifitag^ 



PicUonary 



Sports 



Fourth quarter rally fells Titans, 23-20 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 



For three and a half quarters, it 
seemed like deja vu all over 
again. The Eagles trailed 20-10 
with seven minutes to play, and a 
lethargic and sluggish Clarion 
offense was 67 yards from the 
Titans' end zone. Just like last 
year, the Clarion Golden Eagles 
were on the verge of suffering 
their third straight defeat, and the 
Westminster Titans were one 
quarter away from stripping the 
Eagles from any post-season 
playoff aspirations. 

Then, after two weeks of 
hibernation, the silent Clarion 
offense awakened. Westminster 
never had a chance. 

Early on, it was evident that 
this game would be ruled by the 
defenses. The respective 
offenses could muster only four 
first downs in a scoreless first 
quarter, and the first big break 
did not arise until early in 
quarter number two. 

A Clarion penalty on a Titan 
punt return placed Westminster 
inside the Eag]e 15. On third 
and 18, the Eagles were flagged 
for pass interference, and 
Westminster had first and goal at 
the five. Four times the Titans 
tried to stuff it down Clarion's 
throat. Four times they failed. 
Damon Mazoff thwarted the last 
attempt, a fourth and goal leap 
by Matt Buggey. 

The Clarion offense could not 
move the ball, and a 46 yard 
punt return by Aldridge Jones 
placed the Titans right back 
down at the Eagle 11. This time 
WesUninster went to the air. A 
strike from Sean O'Shea to Tim 
McNeil on the first play from 
scrimmage gave the Titans a 7-0 
lead. 

With seven minutes to play in 
the half, the Eagle "O" had 
mustered only one first down 
and quarterback Chris Zak had 
completed just two of 13 passes 
for two yards. Approaching 
midfield with the offense 
smigghng, the Eagles' coaching 
staff faced a fourth and one 
decision. Damien Henry got 
three. Then, on third and three 
from the 42, Henry got 13. 

Henry's running set up a 
gorgeous play-action strike from 




Leading them back: Clarion quarterback Chris Zak (12) led the 
scoring drives In the last seven minutes against Westminster. 



Zak to Jess Quinn that moved 
the ball to the 12. Two plays 
later, Zak hit Henry out of the 
backfield for a six -yard scoring 
strike, and a tie game. 

Westminster came right back, 
and with just 19 ticks left on the 
clock, O'Shea hit Andy Blatt 
with a 24 yard spiial to reclaim 
the lead for the Titans. 

A flat and disappointed Clarion 
defense took the field for quarter 
number three and watched as the 
Titans waltzed down the field 
like they were guests on the 
Lawrence Welk Show. Buggey 
travelled 51 yards on his first 
r^rry, *thfch wheeled 14 more for 
a Westminster touchdown. The 
extra point was blocked, but 
despite holding the Titans to 21 
yards on 22 carries in the first 
half, the Eagles found 
themselves on the verge of 
getting blown out, 20-7. 



A more confident Clarion 
offense, led mostly by the 
running of Henry, methodically 
marched toward the Titan goal. 
Henry gained 32 yards on the 
drive, but, after over five 
minutes of possession, the 
Eagles had to settle for a 34 yard 
Cramer boot. 

The Eagles moved into Titan 
territory early in the fourth, but 
Cramer had his 40 yard attempt 
blocked, and the score remained 
20-10. 

The clock was dwindling 
down and so were Clarion's 
playoff hopes. 

Westminster lined up for a 
punt with eight minutes to play, 
and the Eagles needed a big play. 
They got it from Marlon 
Worthy. At his own seven yard 
line, and with three Titans 
breathing down his tiny neck. 
Worthy refused to call for a fair 



Pat McDevitt/Clarion Call 
Eagles on two fourth quarter 

catch. A breathtaking 27 yards 
later, the momentum had shifted 
Cl^on's way. 

Zak found Tim Brown for 28, 
then Henry for 14. Two Henry 
runs placed Clarion at the two, 
and Zak snuck it in from there. 
A two point conversion try failed 
and the Eagles trailed 20-16 with 
just five minutes to play. 
The defense held again, and the 
Eagles were 42 yards from 
victory. 

Zak hit Worthy for 18 on the 
first play from scrimmage, and 
two Henry runs moved the ball 
to the 13. 

On first and ten, Zak took a 
brutal hit after an incompletion 
and was forced to leave the 
game. Backup quarterback 
Craig Ray trotted in from the 
sideUne, rolled left, stopped, and 
found Tim Brown in the end 
zone fw the winning score. 



Clarion 7 5 13 - 23 

Westminster 14 6 - 20 



**••*••*•■•*■■*■ 



mmmifmm'imm^m* 



Second Quarter 

Westminster: McNeil 1 1 pass from 
O'Shea fWoods kick). Drive: 1 play, 
1 1 yards, :05. Key play: 46 yd punt 
return by Jones. Westminster 7, 
Clarion 0. 

Clarion: Henry 6 pass from Zak 
{Cramer kick). Drive: 13 plays, 62 
yards, 3:58. Key play: Quinn 17 
pass from Zak on 3rd <fe 10 from 
Titans' 29. Westminster 7» CUP 7. 
Westminster: Blatt 21 pass from 
O'Shea (Woods kick). Drive: 12 
plays, 67 yards, 4:08. Key play: 
Szepietowskj 10 pass from O'Shea 
on 4lh & 7 fn)m Cl.rP 23. 
Westminster 14, Clarion 7. 

T|iird Qnartey 

Westminster: Buggey 14 run (kick 
blocked). Drive 4 plays. 75 yards, 
1 :33. Key play: Duggey 51 run 
moves ball fa>m Titans' 23 to CUP 
26 Westminster 20, Clarion 7. 
Clarion: Cramer 34 FG, Drive: 10 
plays, 49 yards, 5:02. Key play: 
Titans sack Zak twice inside 20 to 
force FG, Westminster 20, Clarion 
10, 

Tourth Quarter 

Clarion : Zak 2 run (pass failed). 
Drive: 8 plays, 66 yard.s, 2:37, Key 
play: Worthy 27 yd punt return. 
Westminster 20, Clarion 16. 
Clarion: Brown 13 pass from Ray 
(Cramer itick). I>ive: 5 plays, 42 
yards, 1:20. Key play: Worthy 18 
pass from Zak moves ball to Titans* 
24. Clarion 23, Westminster 20. 

Team gtatlstlgj? 

Westminster CUP 

First Downs 15 22 

Rusbing Yards 425 180 

Passing Yards 113 173 

Total Offense 238 353 

Corap/Att 10/20 14/34 

Passes Had Int 3 

Fumbles/ Lost 14 0-0 

Penalties/ Yards 10/65 10/76 

3rd Down Con V. 341 9-20 

4tbDowoConv. 44 14 

Player Statisttes 

Rushing- Clarion: Heiuy 31 443; 
Gregory 9-34; Dejidas 1^3; Zak 8-0. 
Westminster: Buggey W-*?; Blatt 
15-72; Guy 1-2; O'Shea 8.(-36). 
Passing- Clarion: Zak 13-33 for 
160 yds, 1 TDand 3 INPs; Ray 11 
for 13 yds and 1 TD. 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



Dess. McKinlev win matches 



Slippery Rock rolls over Eagles 



by Nathan Kahl 
Sportswriter 



Though usually a powerhouse, 
the 1993 season has been a 
disappointing chapter in the 
history book of the Clarion 
University tennis team. Last 
Wednesday the Eagles fell 
deeper into despair with a 6-3 
loss to SUf^ry Rock. 

The Eagles are having one of 
those years that sportswriters 
love to call a "rebuilding" year. 
The fact that they have been the 
top NCAA Division II team in 
the east over the past seven years 
makes this season even harder to 
digest. 

Coach Terry Acker, who was 
28-5 in dual meet play over his 
first three seasons, knew that this 
would be his team's toughest 
year to date. He had hoped that 
his five first year players could 
get used to the college game and 
develop into the type of players 
that Clarion has had a legacy for 
showcasing. For the most part, 
these newcomers have held their 
own, but the Eagles have not 
been able to pull out many 
victories as they saw their record 
drop to 1 -6 against the Rock.'-- 

Clarion entered the match 
against Slippery Rock hewing to 
add to the win column. Shara 
Wolkomir, the Eagles' #1 seeded 
tennis player, suffered a very 
disappointing loss 2-6, 6-2, 5-7. 








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Kristin Mihon/Ctarion Call 
Giving their best shot: A disappointing season has left the 
Golden Eagles swinging towards Allentown and PSACs. 



C & C SPORTS CARDS 

PRESENTS ... 

The 2nd Annual Clarion Mall Autumn Leaf Sports Card Show 
(Clarion Mall, exit 9 off Interstate 80, Clarion, PA) 

October 1-2-3, 1993 

Featuring - Pittsburgh Steeler 
Hall of Famer 

Jack Lambert 

Signing Autographs Sun, Oct. 3, 1993 

1:00 pm to 3:00 pm 

Any item autographed $8.00 Fee 

Register to Win Jack Lambert 

Autographed NFL Football 

& Steeler Watch ( Donated by Kings Jewelers) 

Special appearance by Brad Frazier Sat. Oct. 2, 1993 -1:00 to 4:00 pm 

For more information call: Steve (814) 226-7457 or Willie (814) 744-8836 | 




The former PSAC champion 
dropped to 4-3 on the year. To 
make things even worse for 
Wolkomir, she lost another 
heartbreaker in the doubles 
match as she paired with Melodi 
Dess. The final of that was 5-7, 
7-6 (7-5). 5-7. 

One of the Eagle's singles 
winners was Melodi Dess, who 
overwhelmed her opponent, 6-1, 
6-1, to raise her personal record 

to 3-4. Kristin McKinley upped 
her mark to 4-3 with a 6-2, 5-7, 
6-4 victory. 

Clarion's Roxann Milton and 
Sarah Unkefer took care of 
business with a straight set 6-2, 
6-3 victory. Unfortunately, these 
are the only three wins the 



Eagles could manage. 

Clarion is led by Wolkimir and 
McKinley who each sport 4-3 
singles records. The leading 
doubles tandem consists of 
Wolkimir and Melodi Dess who 
sport a record of 4-3 as well. 

On September 29, the Eagles 
visited the Edinboro Fighting 
Scots, and will face the lUP 
Indians at Indiana today. 
Clarion has a home match 
October 9 against Bloomsburg 
starting at 11:30 at the Campbell 
Hall tennis courts. After that, 
the Eagles begin preparation for 
the PSAC championships at 
Allentown, which will be held 
on the 14th, 15th and the 16th of 
October. 



Griffo medals 



by Nathan Kahl 
Sportswriter 



On Saturday, September 25th, 
the Clarion Golden Eagles men's 
and women's cross country 
teams travelled to Geneva 
College in Beaver Falls. Out of 
a field of six teams, the men 
finished fifth a<id the women 
were fourth overall. 

The women's team was 
sparked by the significant 
improvements of Lyna Baluh 
and Jen Dansberger Of the 54 
girls in the race, Bulah fmisbed 
17th and Dansberger 18th, but it 
was the third place finish of 
Lisa Griffo that lifted the Eagles 
into fourth place overall. Griffo 
completed the three mile course 
with a time of 20:55, good for a 
nice piece of metal to wear 
around her neck. Captain Megan 
Stecklair finished 12th with a 
time of 21:48, Lisa Benlock 
came in 16th with a mark of 
22:30, Lynn Baluh was five 
seconds behind Benlock and 
finished 17th, while Jen 
Dansberger was seven seconds 
behind Benlock and finished 
18th. Jen Gleason finished 27th 
with a mark of 23:36, and 
Brandee Payne placed 34th with 
a time of 24:00. 



"The girl's pack has improved 
greatly," Stecklair said. "We are 
working towards our goal of 
qualifying for regionals. " 

A stomach virus kept Chad 
Briggs from finishing at his 
nonnal excellent pace, but it did 
not stop the men from placing 
fifth overall. The men ran a five 
mile race with a field of 65 total 
runners. 

, The men are shpwing signs of 
improvement week to week and 
feel that they should place higher 
in meets to come. 

The mens' results are as 
follows: Scott Neffner finished 
15th at 29:09; Russ Breindel 
placed 25th at 29:31; Chad 
Briggs finished 31st at 30:15; 
Rick Rectenwald came in 38th at 
31:04; Brian Patterson placed 
39th at 31:13; Brian Stohr 
crossed the finish line 45th at 
31:41, and John Homick was 
53rd at 34:58. 

The Cross-Country team is 
next in action at the Bloomsburg 
Invitational on Saturday. "This 
meet will mark tiie midpoint of 
the season , and will show where 
the team stands and where it has 
yet to go," said Briggs. Race 
time will be sometime between 
11:00 AM and noon. 



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The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



r."- 



• I 



Page 21 



CorbeiL Bierlv lead Eag les 



Clarion finishes third at Mercyhurst 



f by Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 



The Clarion University golf 
team continued its climb to the 
top of the PSAC with a third 
place finish at the Mercyhurst 
Invitational on Monday. 

Slippery Rock won the 11 team 
event with a combined team 
score of 307 while Clarion 
entered the clubhouse with a 
score of 320. 

The Eagles were led by senitx* 
Todd Corbeil who shot a 
blistering 77. Cory Bierly, who 
improves every match, shot a 
1993 best of 78. Andy Ganoe 
finished with an 82, Brian Fiscus 
shot an 83 and Chris Brosius 
took a 94. 

Clarion was the host school in 
the Hal Hansen Memorial 
Tournament on September 19- 
20. 

The Eagles "blue' te^n finished 
fifth with a score of 667 and 
their 'gold' team placed seventh 
with a total of 686, out of the 1 1 
teams represented. 

Allegheny won the event with 
a combined 36 hole score of 640. 
The Clarion *bhie' squad was led 
by Ganoe with a two-day score 








...i^ismiMA.um! 



of 162. Brosius shot a 165, 
Fiscus took a 169, Corbeil 
finished with a 171, and Rob 
Pierson ended with a score of 
174. 

The 'gold' team was led by 
Bierly's 167. Chris Williams 
took a 172, while Ron 
Malinchak salvaged a 175 
despite hacking his way to a 93 
in the opening round. Matt 
Fiscus shot a 180, and Greg 
Greksa finished the day with a 
181. 

The Eagles participated in the 
Slippery Rock Invitational on 
September 16. The first team 
placed ninth with a score of 318 
and the second team finished 
12th out of 14 teams with a 327. 

Youngstown State won the 
invite with a mark of 288. Brian 
Fiscus was the runner-up 
medalist as he blistered through 
the course to fmish the day with 



a 71. Brosius blasted a 78, 
Corbeil shot an 84, Williams 
knocked an 85, and Fiscus 
entered the clubhouse with an 
86. 

The second team saw Ganoe 
and Malinchak shoot 80's, and 
saw Pierson blast an 8 1 . Greksa 
shot an 85, and Bieriy took an 
86. 

September 13 was the date that 
Clarion participated in the 
Gannon Invitational. The Eagles 
finished 12th out of the 18 
squads with a score of 345. The 
winning team took away a score 
of 303. Brosius shot an 82, 
Fiscus stroked an 84, Williams 
pelted an 89, Bieriy shot 90, and 
Corbeil struggled to a 93. 

The Eagles will next be in 
action at Allegheny on October 
5, with the PSAC championships 
scheduled for October 14. 



Ray Henderson/ Clarion Call 
Chris Williams shot 172 for the 36 hole Hal Hansen 
Memorial tournament. He and the Golden Eagles' seem to 
improve every week as they prepare for PSACs Oct. 14-16. 



Sports Editor 

applications for spring 

semester are available at the 

Call office. Inqiiire within or 

caU X2380 



Eagles fly west 



by Debbie Adams 
Sportswriter 



The Clarion University 
volleyball team continued their 
skid this week by losing their 
11th consecutive game. The 
Eagles are off to a rocky start, 
so where better to heighten your 
record than lovely Colorado. 

The Eagles flew out to the 
great Northwest last night and 
will play the University of 
Colorado at Colorado Springs 
tonight, and then participate in a 
tournament Friday and Saturday. 

Clarion dropped a match to 
California 5-15, 14-16, 9-15 on 
Tuesday to drop its overall 
record to 2-12 

Katie Rhodes finished with 27 
set assists and Bobbie Simpson 
had 13 kills in a losing cause. 
Lisa Flynn collected seven digs. 

The Eagle's travelled to 
Mercyhurst where they were 
defeated three games to none. 

Mercyhurst took the lead early 
in the first set with a score of 3- 
15. They continued to prove to 
be more powerful than the 
Eagles by winning the next two 



sets 13-15 and 12-15. 

Despite the loss, Lisa Flynn 
managed seven kills, which 
moved her to second place in 
kills this season with a total of 
121. Leading the team in digs 
this game was Katie Rhodes. 
Lisa Flynn has the most this 
season with 156. 

Simpson leads the Eagles in 
kills with 141 and Rhodes leads;^ 
in assists with 213. Flynn has^ 
mwe sevice aces than any Eagle | 
as she has collected 27 this far. 

The team will try to end theirl 
11 game losing streak and 
improve their 2-12 record with a 
game at the University of 
Colorado on Thursday and al 
tournament on Friday andf 
Saturday. They will return home 
on Tuesday to play lUP. It will be 
the first of five consecutive home 
games for the Eagles who have| 
only played two thus far. 

Point Park, Slippery Rock and I 
Edinboro visit Tippin before thej 
Eagles go on the road again. 

The Eagles host the Clarion! 
Alumni Tournament at 1 1 AM on | 
the Saturday of the ALF parade. 




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Page 22 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, September 30, 1993 



Page23 



Sports Commentary 



Will the Saints come marching in? 



hy Jody Males 
Sportswriter 



I sal once again, glued to my 
television set on vSunUay 
;illcrn(X)n. As Morten Andersen 
walked onto the field to attempt 
his game winning field goal, I 
felt like part of a ritual. Ilow 
mjujy limes has Andersen won a 
game for the Saints by splitting 
the uprights in the final seconds? 
Add one to that number. 

The 33-year old, 12 year 
veteran is almost a given in 
game-winning situations. On 
Sunday, Andersen connected 
from 49 yards to give New 
Orleans a 16-13 victory over the 
San Francisco 49ers. Perhaps 



the CBS broadcast team of Pat 
Summerall and John Madden put 
il be.st by saying, "This is why 
you pay a kicker millions of 
dollars... to win games." 
Andersen is the Nolan Ryan of 
the NM.. No voting needed, just 
induct him now. 

With their three point win, the 
Saints improved to 4-0 and now 
sport the best record in the NF^X. 
Iwcry year, it seems New 
Orleans thrives on a slogan and 
cjuries that motto with them into 
the playoffs. Iwen though the 
Saints have never won a post- 
season game, slogans like "Who 
dal, who dal, who dat say they 
gonna beat them Saints," "Cha- 



ching" and "Ya Gotta Believe" 
have bellowed from the lips of 
the Supcrdome faithful. A far 
cry from the days when the 
Saints couldn't sell tickets, but 
there was a mad rush for paper 
bags at the local Piggly Wiggly. 

ITiis year the Saints' slogan is 
somewhat off the wall, but isn't it 
always. "Whoop there it is" is 
the choice for 1993. I still don't 
know exactly what il means, but 
regardless, it has the Saints 
undefeated after four weeks. 
They better win a playoff game 
soon or their slogan will be 
"undcrachicvers." 

New Orleans is certainly one 
of the most unusual teams in pro 



football. 1 mean, how many 
team owners do you see twirling 
umbrellas on the sideline for a 
victory celebration? 

The Saints' defense can 
certainly back up the off-the- 
field shenanigans. The quartet 
of Rickey Jackson, Vaughn 
Johnson, Sam Mills, and Pat 
Swilling has arguably been the 
best linebacking corps in NFL 
history. But, an off-season 
transaction sent Swilling to 
Detroit thus collapsing the all- 
time unit, right? Wrong. In steps 
6'4", 255 pound, Renaldo 
Turnbull, who fills Swilling's 
shoes ever so nicely. 

The Saints offense has long 
strummed to a different beat, at 



least until now. A team that has 
had offensive problems in the 
past, has turned it around, and so 
far in 1993, leads the league in 
scoring. 

Wade Wilson is at the helm 
for his 13th professional season 
at quarterback. The Saints have 
all cylinders pumping, offense, 
defense, and special teams, and 
there may be a changing of the 
guard in the NFC West. The Old 
Gold and Black might just be the 
real McCoy. 

Hopefully, when the second 
round of the playoffs come 
around, the Saints' slogan is still 
"Whoop there it is," instead of 
Whoop , here we aren't... again. 



Brown approaches all-time mark 



Eagles begin defense of PSAC title against Edinboro 



by Tondelaya Carey 
Sportswriter 



The Clarion Fagles 1993 
defense of their PSAC-Westem 
Division chjunpionship begins 
Saturday, October 2 at home 
against Rdinboro. Kickoff time 
is scheduled for 1 p.m. at 
Clarion's MemorijU Stadium. 

The defending PSAC- Western 
chjunps enter the game with a 1 - 
2 overall record. The Hagles 
started the season off in 1993 
with a tough 19-17 loss against 
West Chester (last year's 
defending PSAC Champions 
Fast) after leading 17-6 at 
halftime. The Fagles then 
traveled to New Haven and lost 
35-23 to the second ntnked te;un 
in Division II. The Golden 
luigles bounced back with a 23- 
20 win over seventh ranked 
Wesuninsler last Saturday. 

"No doubt about il, it's a big 
gjunc for both leimis," said Gene 



Sobolewski, head coach of the 
Eagles for eleven years. "When 
we play Fdinboro it's always an 
aggressive, physical game," 
Sobolewski said. "Both teams 
play intense defense and have 
the capability of scoring from 
anywhere on the field on offen.se. 
If you like hard-hitting football, 
don't miss this game." 

The Clarion offense is 
averaging 366 yards of total 
offense per game, including 146 
on the ground and 220 through 
the air. Quiulerback Chris Ziik, 
who has completed 46 of 108 
passes for 607 yards and four 
touchdowns in 1993, left the 
game at Wesuninster late in the 
fourth qujirtcr with a leg injury. 
Backup Craig Ray made a game 
winning 13 yard touchdown pass 
to Tim Brown on the next play 
wiih 2:07 left in the game. Ziik 
returned for the final scries 

All-Amcrican tight end Tim 
Brown has 20 catches for 205 




ITS TIME AGAIN FOR 
The National Broadcasting Society 

to take applications for anyone wishing to 
apply for membership 

Applications c;ui be picked up in the Communication Dcpt. 
office on the ground n(K)r of Becker. There will be a meeting 
for any interested appliciuits on Tuesday, Octolier 5th at 5:00 
in r(N>m 151 liecker. 

We would love to have a lot of new 
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yards and one touchdown this 
season and is ranked third in 
career catches at Clarion with 
136. Brown needs 15 receptions 
to break the all-time Golden 
Eagle record. 

Running back Damien Henry 
is ranked second in ihe PSAC- 
West averaging 123.3 yards per 
game, gaining 370 yards and 
one touchdown on 78 attempts. 
Henry, in his senior year, is 
currently fifth on the all-time 
ru.shing list with 1,460 yards and 
is eighth in career touchdowns 
with 19. 

Edinboro's offense is well 
balanced between the run and the 
pass. The Fighting Scots are 
averaging 363.3 yards per game 
including 178.3 on the ground 
and 185 passing. The defense is 
yielding only 318 yards per 
game, including 207.7 passing 
and only 1 10.3 on the ground. 

Edinboro gave Clarion its only 
conference loss last season, a 26- 
17 heartbreaker at EulinbcM-o. 

The Clarion Homecoming 
Game versus Bloomsburg is set 
for Saturday, October 9. The 
kickoff is scheduled for 2 p.m. at 
Memorial Stadium. 




Pat McDevitt/ Clarion Call 
Wow: Clarion's Marlon Worthy is averaging 21.4 yards per 
catch, 20.6 per kick return, and 9.8 yards each punt return. 



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Personals 



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Sports Opinion 



The Mighty Ducks put sports in perspective 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 



I often hear people say that the 
newest National Hockey League 
franchise, the Anaheim Mighty 
Ducks, is an embarrassment to 
sports. They argue that the 
playful name of the Disney 
owned team portrays sports as 



being something silly or trivial. 

Hello! McBy! 

SporLs is a fantasy world. Lets 
face it, you can't walk down the 
street dressed like Tom Barrasso, 
you'll get laughed out of town. 
Sports aren't real life, they're an 
escape from real life. They're an 
escape from the hustle and 
bustle, the trials and tribulations. 



That's why millions of people 
attend sporting events each year. 
No matter how much money 
players are paid or how many 
times these overpaid players feel 
it necessary to go on strike, 
sports still act as a release for 
fans of all ages, and these fans 
will always come back for more. 
Unfortunately, in the brutally 





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competitive and violent society 
we live in, a bench clearing 
brawl occurs almost every night. 
The Al Davis motto "Just win 
baby" is treated as gospel by 
Little League coaches all over 
the world. It gets so bad, that 
pitcher Donnie Moore killed 
himself after giving up the game 
winning homerun with two outs 
in the ninth inning in the 1986 
American League Championship 
Series. 

The wealthy lifestyles of 
professional athletes have 
produced new definitions in 
sports terms. Coke once was 
something you drank at the ball 
park while watching your 
favorite player. Now its the 
reason your favorite player isn't 
permitted to play. 

Some college athletes ruin 
their lives by trying to get an 
edge on their competition 
through the use of steroids. The 
pressure to make the starting 
lineup or even to keep their 



scholarship costs thousands of 
athletes valuable years of their 
lives. 

Colleges are constantly ruining 
their own reputations by offering 
a recruit a little money here and 
a little car there in an effort to 
coax him into joining their 
particular program. 

Basketball players Reggie 
Lewis and Hank Gathers fell in 
love with their sport so much, 
they sought second opinions 
when it was diagnosed they had 
heart trouble. Both continued to 
play, and both tragically died on 
the basketball court. 

Caught up in all the gambling 
scandals of Pete Rose and 
Michael Jordan. Caught up in all 
the bitterness between the 
Pistons and the Bulls, the 
Yankees and the Red Sox, Chuck 
Noll and Jerry Glanville. Caught 
up in all of the new terms like 
revenue sharing, free agency, 
and collusion, along comes the 
Mighty Ducks to finally put 
sports in its proper perspective. 




October 7, 1993 




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The Clarion Call 




The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania 




Page 2 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



The Clarion 
Call 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chief 

Alan Vaughn 

Managing Editor 

Rodney Sherman 

News Editor 

Amy Gerkin 

Lifestyle Editor 

Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 
Ray Henderson 
Photography Editor 
Samantha White 
Ad Design 
Chris Clouse 
Advertising Manager 
Brigitte Josefczyk 
Circulation Editor 

& Interim 

Business Manager 

Hans Dovenspike 

Copy/Design Editor 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 12:00 p.m. on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
the Student Activity Fee and 
a dvertising revenue. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 2380 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch...$5^0 

Classified Ads...$1.00 for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $^0 

The front page photo was 
taken by Ray Henderson 

Volume 74, Issue 5 

The Clarion Call is printed on 
recycled newsprint 



Opinion 




The way I see it 



/yZ'cJtJ.^. A>^^- 



Editor-in-chicf 



America: Seeing 

it again for the 

first time 

Greetings students. 

Last semester I was fortunate 
enough to have the unmatchable 
experience of participating in the 
University of Pittsburgh's 
Semester at Sea program. In 
January I boarded the S.S. 
Universe in the Bahamas. I 
spent the following 100 days 
traveling around the world and 
taking classes with about 400 
other college students (okay, our 
professors, an administrative 
staff and the ship's crew came 
too). 

Our ports of call included La 
Guira, Venezuela; Salvador, 
Brazil; Capetown, South Africa; 
Mombasa, Kenya; Madras, 
India; Penang, Malaysia; Hong 
Kong; Keelung, Taiwan; Kobe, 
Japan and Seattle, U.S.A. 

I learned an unattainable 
amount of knowledge and had 
many incredible experiences, but 
nothing seems more relevant to 
me than the new perspective that 
I have on life. 

Many people who go abroad 
come home feeling very lucky. I 
am no exception. Yes, I felt 
discrimination as a woman, but 
never because my skin is white. 
I realized that I really don't have 
problems when compared to 
most people in the world. I'm 
lucky, damn lucky. I live in a 
society where I have (relative) 
freedom of speech, religion and 
all, but upon my return to 
America, I found myself closely 
examining this society for what 
it is, and not what I was taught to 
believe. 

I encountered no problem 
abroad that I couldn't find right 
here at home, I just saw them in 
a different context. 




Christin Mihon 

Economic problems? One 
doesn't have to travel to 
Venezuela to see economic 
problems. While Americans are 
not plagued by 800% inflation 
like Venezuelans, it's obvious 
that our economy has problems. 

Governmental grief? Sure 
Brazil's politicians are skimming 
hundreds of millions of dollars 
out of funds, being bribed by 
multi-international corporations 
and are guilty of sending hit 

{Cont. on pg. 4) 



Yes, it's that time of year 
again-Autumn Leaf with all its 
food and rides and air of festivity 
and of course its traffic 
congestion and lack of available 
parking. 

Clarion is lucky in the respect 
that Autumn Leaf is one week 
out of the year, therefore, the 
parking problem is temporary. 
Clarion University's parking 
mayhem, however, seems more 
permanent. 

Every morning when I walk to 
class I am treated to the sight of 
commuting students racing their 
cars through the parking lots, 
frantically searching the 
overflowing lots for that coveted 
empty space. 

More than once I have seen 
cars parked illegally because 
there is more pending business at 
hand like class, than trying to 
spend hours finding an empty 
space. And, as a result, public 
safety mosies around the lots 
looking for the offenders so they 
can gleefully ticket them. 

The university, I am quite 
certain, is making a bundle off of 
the parking problem. (They got 
me for $10.) So, it seems 
reasonable to suggest that this 
dilemma won't be solved in the 
near future because, in our 



financial straits, parking 
offenders are inadvertently 
lessening the burden. 

Of course there is always lot W 
if you are willing to walk miles 
to your classes. In bad weather, 
this solution seems less 
appealing than receiving a 
paiking ticket. 

Eventually you will probably 
see students sleeping in their cars 
overnight in the parking lots just 
so they can keep the space they 
were lucky enough to grab two 
days ago. 

Or maybe you will see parting 
students auction off their spaces 
to arriving conmiuters. There's a 
moneymaking proposition! 

I wonder how much people 
would be willing to pay in order 
not to miss the exam they were 
supposed to take five minutes 
ago. 

But wait, commuters pay for 
the privelege already with a $15 
parking permit and a glove box 
full of unpaid parking tickets. 

Ask yourself please, how much 
additional money are you 
willing to pay this university for 
the privelege of going here? 
Then, please ask yourself, how 
much are you willing to put up 
with? 



IT'S m m^ cf AM< 




OisiriDuiea Dv TriDunc Media Services 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 3 



Reader Responses 



Nov. 14 of last year was a day 

that seriously impeded the 

progress of the lUP football 

DlriOfl paper in their drive to the 

*^*- V" Division II National 



Championship. On that day, 
Clarion beat the Indians in a 
hard-fought game that Indian 
fans will not soon forget, much 
less forgive Clarion. Even 





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though ttiis year, on almost the 
exact same day, we will all go to 
the lUP-Clarion game on our 
home turf (lUP) to see the 
Indians cap off another great 
season with a victory, there is 
another way we can all help to 
beat Clarion. 

lUP's Student Congress has 
issued a challenge to Clarion's 
Student Government Association 
regarding the bloodmobile 
coming up this week. At each 
blood drive, the Red Cross sets a 
quota as to the number of pints 
of blood that the effort must 
produce. If lUP donors can top 
the quota by a greater percentage 
than Clarion tops it, we (lUP) 
will win the challenge. The 
winner will have its school flag 
flown over the campus of the 
losing school for one day. 

Ask yourself this question: Do 
we really want to fly Clarion's 
flag on our campus for even one 
day? Also, what could be 
sweeter revenge for last year's 
game than having our flag flown 
over its campus (except for the 
victory we will eam on Nov. 13, 
of course)? 

Besides, we need to give blood 
now so that Clarion's football 
team will have an extra supply 
on that glamorous November 
day, because they will be 
needing it. Most importantly, we 
need to give blood because 
"Saving a life is the right 
reason." 
James C. Leda, President 

lUP Student Congress 



Last 
Laugh 



Dear Clarion, 

Calling out to all living 
and breathing bodies out there! 



As if it isn't enough that wc ask 
for all your money, now we're 
asking for your bl(K>d. No, this 
is not some kind of twisted 
tuition increase. The Student 
Congress at our dear sister 
institution, lUP, has thrown 
down it's dulled tomahawk to the 
faithful and proud students of 
Clarion University to compete in 
the American Red Cross 
Bloodmobile Challenge. It is 
astonishing that lUP feels itself 
of sufficient quality to have our 
golden eagle soar above their 
dispirited institution. The 
reason I say "dispirited" is 
because lUP didn't even reach 
their goal of 600 pints of blood 
in two days. They came up short 
again for the loss not only 
because of the offense but the 
defense didn't even show up. It 
just seems that anytime the 
words "Clarion University" are 
mentioned in the lUP area, all 
those unfortunate souls just drop 
to their knees and whine, in true 
Wayne and Garth fashion, 
"We're not worthy." 

The American Red 
Cross has set Clarion's 
bloodmobile goal at 175 pints of 
blood in one day, October 18th 
from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the 
Gemmell Multi-purpose room. 
Prizes and gift certificates will 
be disbursed throughout the 
bloodmobile. Student Senators 
will be assisting the Red Cross 
volunteers, but it is you (well, 
your blood) that we need. No 
matter if you are a first timer or a 
professional donor, stop and 
consider the impact you will 
make. You may even "save a 
life". 

Enjoy the fesitival this 
weekend and stay healthy. 

Gara L Smith 
President, Student Senate 



WE LOVE THE OMICRON PLEDGE CLASS 



Julie Harmon 
Rebecca Kelly 
Kristie Marmo 
Renee Shiska 



Vanessa Hartman 
Kerry Leonard 
Cathy Rubino 
Airr.oe Shreve 



Christine Holt 



Delta Phi Epsilon 



Page 4 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Hide Park 

(cont from pg. 2) 



squads and mercenaries to kill or 
destroy their enemies, but that 
happens here in America too. 

Rampant crime? Riots? 
ScKial unrest? Do I even have to 
discuss this? It may be getting 
some attention from others now 
because it's getting closer to their 
homes. 

Apathy? Never mind Kenya, 
how about here? When was the 
last time that you stood up for 
something that didn't directly 
affect you, lobby government or 
write a letter to your governor or 
state representative? 

Human rights? China comes 
to mind, but let's take an 
example straight from American 
history, the story of the Native 
Americans. (Not too far from a 
system of aparthied in my 
opinion.) For those who still 
may believe that the Native 
Americans wanted to live on 
reservations and have their food 
and goods provided by the U.S. 
government, I beg you to do a 
close examination of their 
culture and the way the 
government exploited, lied to, 
stole from and forced these 
people into submission. 

Let's talk environmental issues. 
We're quick to condemn the 
Brazilians for destroying their 



precious rainforest, but how 
many virgin forests do we have? 
Sadly, the U.S. Forest Service is 
still more concerned with 
servicing large logging 
companies than protecting 
national forests. And what about 
our country's practice of waste 
trade? 

What about poverty? We don't 
have to visit an untouchable 
village in India, the poverty rate 
in America has reached 36%, 
and children are the largest 
group affected. One doesn't 
have to look far at all to see poor 
or homeless Americans. 

Prejudice and discrimination? 
It's obvious to women, blacks, 
Indians, Asians, and, in one way 
or another, maybe everyone 
who's not a white male. To 
quote a professor who was on 
the ship with me, Nagueyelti 
Warren, "South Africa has no 
monopoly on banning nor 
detainment. Their's is crude, 
America's insidious." 

So, where does this leave us as 
students at Clarion? I believe 
that we as young Americans 
have grown lazy in the comfort 
of our predecessors' efforts to 
raise social equity and societal 
decency to the point that it is 
now. Many have not joined in 



the fight for justice and equality 
in our society, and that's why 
we're not getting anywhere 
anymore This is a huge 
problem. When was the last 
time some of us stood up for 
something that really mattered? 
Are we doing enough as 
citizens? Are we involved in 
actions for change, or are we too 
caught up in our ethnocentric, 
closed-minded, insecure and 
unbending sense of what is 
politically correct or popular? 

Julian Bond spoke to us about 
the "torch of change." He said 
that when he was young, he saw 
the torch quivering in an unsure 
hand, so he grabbed it and ran 
with it. It's time for us to do just 
that, but will we? 

We live in a country where we 
are able to work for, and achieve, 
change. We are in the times of 
our lives where we can do so. 
Why don't we? 

Christin Mihon is a junior in 
the communication depart' 
ment. 



MN Clarion 





Clarion Hospital's 

Convenient Care Center 

10 A.M. -10 P.M. 

Open Every Day 




The Emergency Medical Personnel at Clarion Hospital hope that our 
services are not required while you enjoy Clarion's 1993 Autumn Leaf Festival. 
However, we would like you to know that our staff is standing by to serve you 
if the need should arise. For minor emergencies, visit the Convenient Care 
Center located in Clarion Hospital's newly expanded Emergency Department. 

Clarion Hospital is located off Exit 9, Interstate 80, two miles south of Clarion Borough. 



Dave Barry 



Stronger than dirt 

C)Tb<»Mi»nu Herald 



1 am pleased to report that, 
thanks to an important scientific 
advance, the human race may soon 
be able, after years of frustration 
and failure to lick soap scum. 

I have here an article from 
ASTM Standardization News. 
ASTM stands for "American 
Society for Testing and Materials," 
which is an organization that, as its 
name impHes, has something to do 
with testing and materials. The 
article states: 

"Topping the list of the most 
dreaded household chores, 
cleaning the soap scum from our 
showers and and bathtubs has also 
been one of the most challenging. 
But thanks to a new guide 
developed by Subcommittee D- 
12.16 on Hard Surface Cleaning, 
part of Committee D-12 on Soaps 
and Other Detergents, beating soap 
scum is expected to become easier 
and less expensive. 

This is wonderful news indeed, 
because everybody has soap scum. 
Poke your head into the finest 
bathrooms in the world -- in 
Buckingham Palace, the White 
House, even the Vatican — and 
you'll be shot by security guards. 
So just take my word for it, there's 
soap scum in there, and they can't 
get rid of it, because soap scum is 
the most durable substance known, 
a fact that was demonstrated by 
the U.S. space program. You may 
recall that when the first space 
shuttle was built, scientists were 
concerned about protecting it from 
the intense heat of re-entry into the 
atmosphere. So what did they do? 
THEY COVERED THE 
SHUTTLE WITH TILES. They 
knew that tiles are the ideal 
breeding ground for soap scum 
and that soap scum cannot be 
harmed by atmospheric re-entry or 
even leading household cleansers. 

Here on Earth, anti-soap-scum 
products are not effective. I base 
this statement on a recent 
nationwide survey of my Research 
Department, Judi Smith, who said, 
"The stuff they say gets rid of soap 
scum never, ever works." 

(She also said: "My shower is 
way too dirty to attribute to soap 
scum." But I am far too respectful 
of her privacy to include that in 
the column. I also will not include 
the following actual quote from 
her husband Tim: "What's soap 
scum?") 

For many years, the only 
prestigious international research 
insitiution working on the soap- 
scum problem was Heloise, who 
was always running hints from 
readers about it. ("Heloise, my 
soap-scum problem was so bad 



that my husband said he didn't 
even want to take a shower! So I 
made a mixture of three parts 
vinegar, one part lemon juice and 
two parts sulfuric acid, and I put it 
in his coffee.") 

But the Subconunittee D-12. 16 
on Hard Surface Cleaning swung 
into action. According to the 
ASTM Standardization News 
article, researchers "went to 
consumers' homes and scraped off 
soap scum to analyze it. I bet 
THAT was a fun job. 

RESEARCHER: Hi! I'm with 
the American Society for Testing 
and Materials, and I'd like to- 
obtain some of your soap scum. 

CONSUMER (calling to 
spouse): Marge, get the rifle. 

But the determined men and 
women of Subcommittee D-12. 16 
perservered. Using their samples, 
they were able, for the first time in 
recorded history that I know of, to 
reproduce soap scum in the 
laboratory. (The article does not 
reveal the exact formula, but it 
involves human body fat and an 
ingredient identified only as 
"dirt.") The article also does not 
reveal where they GET the body 
fat. Maybe they just go to 
liposuction chnics and ask for it. 
"It's OK!" they explain. "We're 
making soap scum!" 

To determine how cleansers are 
used in consumer households, the 
researchers also conducted what 
the article describes as "actual 
tests" in which they determined 
"when consumers stop wringing 
the water from their sponge and 
how much (cleanser) product they 
place on the sponge." (It is only a 
matter of time before this whole 
effort is dramatized in a motion 
picture starring Harrison Ford.) 

Armed with this information, the 
researchers developed a method 
for testing tile cleansers. The 
cleansers are tested on tiles that 
have been coated with laboratory 
scum, then heated in an oven. 
("Care to join us for lunch, Ted?" 
"No thanks. Bob! I just put a fresh 
batch of scum in the oven!") 

Please understand that we do 
NOT yet have a cure for soap 
scum. But we do have, finally, a 
standardized cleanser-testing 
method. And the Standardization 
News article confidently predicts 
that this standard will produce 
benefits that "go far beyond the 
bathroom." 

On behalf of consumers 
everywhere, I salute the 
researchers of Subcommittee D- 
12.16 on HardSurface Cleaning. I 
hope that their achievement will 
inspire other ASTM groups. 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 5 



J 






News 



CUP professor and area legislator 



Wright requests probe of state A.G. 



by Rodney L. Sherman 
News Editor 

Local legislator and Clarion 
University professor David 
Wright has asked the FBI to 
investigate charges that the 
Pennsylvania Attorney General 
Ernie Preate Jr. ordered his arrest 
shortly before the 1992 election. 



speculation that the course of the 
probe was being dictated by 
politics. 

The Patriot-News, based in 
Harrisburg, reported in last 
Sunday's edition that Preate 
ordered an agent to arrest Wright 
and his former campaign aide 
Dr. Kenneth Mechling, also a 
Clarion University professor. 






File Photo 
State Rep. David R. Wright (D-63), seen here at Knox's 
Horse Thief Days parade, has asked for an investigation of 
state attorney general Ernie Preate Jr. 

Wright declined to tell The The Patriot-News quoted people 



Patriot-News what he told an 
FBI agent who interviewed hun 

twice after he called the U.S. 
Attorney's office in August. 

Wright said he contacted 
federal authorities about the 
handling of the Mechling 
investigation because of 



it said were "familiar with the 
probe." 

The arrests never took place, 
however 12 days before the 
election, Preate's office did serve 
search warrants on Mecbling's 
bank accounts tied to a company 
he owns. 

The Harrisburg paper said 



sources told them that in the fall 
of 1992, Deputy Attorney 
General Lois Lichenwalner 
telephoned Gregory Kerpchar, 
the agent handling the on-going 
Mechling investigation, and told 
him to prepare to arrest both 
Wright and Mechling. The 
Patriot-News claimed Kerpchar 
balked at preparing the warrants, 
because he lacked probable 
cause. 

Mechling had been accused of 
using university offices and 
equipment during earlier Wright 
re-election bids. According to 
the Patriot-News, those 
allegations have been dismissed 
by investigators who are now 
trying to determine if Mechling 
violated ethics laws by awarding 
state contracts to the company he 
owns, School Science Services 
Inc. 

Preate spokesman Robert 
Gentzel called the report "very 
shoddy journalism," and added 
that the order "simply didn't 
happen." 

The Patriot-News quoted 
Gentzel as saying, "Nobody's 
alleged Representative Wright 
did anything wrong, I don't even 
have any idea what we were 
suppose to have been arresting 
him for. I don't know what 
allegation we would have put in 
the arrest warrant." Gretzel said 
Wright is no longer a target of 
the investigation. 

Sources talking to the Patriot- 
News said die arrest order came 
from the "front office" of the 
state attorney general. In 
investigations involving 
members of the state assembly, 
Preate requires any actions to be 
approved by the front office, 
which is composed of the 
attorney general himself and his 
top deputy, Walter Cohen. 

Cohen explained the paper 
work required for both an arrest 
and a search warrant are the 

same and Gretzel added that 
Kerpchar may have become 
confused and thought he was 
actually drafting an arrest 
warrant 

Cohen added that any arrest 
order would have had to cross 



his desk. In this case, he insisted, 
that never happened. 

The Patriot-News quoted 
Wright as saying, "1 am 
disappointed but I can't say that 
I'm surprised," adding, "If the 
House and Senate are gearing up 
for impeachment proceedings of 
a (state) Supreme Court justice 
this fall, I think they should 



handling of investigations 
involving political contributors 
and his failure to report 
$146,000 in campaign 
contributions has drawn heavy 
criticism from those who are 
considering a run for 
Pennsylvania governor. It is 
widely accepted that Preate is 
considering a run for the office. 




AP photo 

Pennsylvania Attorney General Ernie Preate Jr., already 
under investigation by the FBI, allegedly ordered the arrest 
of Rep. David Wright and Dr. Kenneth Mechling. 



consider impeaching the attorney 
general at the same time." 

State Speaker of the House, H. 
William DeWeese said he would 
seek an investigation by "higher 
authorities" if Preate's office 
indeed sought an arrest order for 
Wright. 

Preate is already involved in a 
controversy concerning his 



Several calls to Wright's 
Harrisburg office were not 
returned before press time and 
the FBI declined to conunent on 
the story or the investigation. 



Original story by Peter J. 
Shelly and Pete Shellum, of 
The Patriot-Sews in 
Harrishurg and is used with 
pernmmn. 



^ «» ^^ .-.rw 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page? 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



News Feature 



Public Safety: it isn't all parking tickets 



by Katie Zaikoski 
News Writer 



If you have ever earned a 
parking ticket on campus, you 
have probably wondered if 
Public Safety doesn't have 
anything else to do. Actually, 
Public Safety does have other 
duties. 

According to Dr. Ron 
Martinazzi, the Public Safety 
department "is an umbrella for 
three different areas of concern." 
These areas include Law 
Enforcement, Workman's 
Compensation/Risk Management 
and Safety. 

Law Enforcement is the most 
familiar to students since it is the 
most highly visible aspect of 
their duties. Under the 
department of Law Enforcement 
the uniform crime report is 
prepared by Public Safety. This 
crime report sends all crimes that 
occur on campus to PA state 
police monthly. Law 
Enforcement also deals width 
crime prevention and the alerting 
of students of possible crime 
situations. One of their projects 
was to encourage students to buy 
loud whistles from the book 
store for protection when 
walking alone. Dr. Martinazzi 
said "it takes everybody to have 
a safe environment." 

Martinazzi also added "we \iy 
to emphasize a lot in crime 
prevention, that's what we are 
striving to do. We teach people 
how to investigate crimes, we 
teach students on dorm floors, 
participate in drug and alcohol 
programs and we also talk with 
sororities and fraternities about 
crime and safety." 

Workman's Compensation/Risk 
Management are the departments 



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of Public Safely that are 
probably the most unfamiliar to 
students. Over the past three 
years, workman's compensation 
has significantly reduced the 
amount of accidents that took 
place in the working 
environment by safety training 
and by the enthusiasm of 
workers. Dr. Martinazzi said 
"safety has been de-centralized 
and it is now everyone's 
concern. The superintendents are 
conducting safety training based 
on jobs." 

Accidents that occur on 
campus are identified by 
workman's compenstaton 
programs. "They are categorized 
and it directs us in determining 
which accidents and what types 
of accidents are occurring. It's 
almost like a guideline. 

"We tie in workman's 
compensation and safety 
together as a program which 
provides benefits for PA 
employees who are injured or 
who have contracted a disease 
which is caused or made worse 
through the work environment. 

"It's up to the safety program to 
reduce risk by lowering accident 
rates," Martinazzi said. 

Although Risk Management is 
tied in with Workmans 
Compensation, it is rare that any 
incidents conerning risk 
management need to be dealt 
with. An example of the duties 
under the department of risk 
management would be if a non- 
employee wants to file a claim if 
they are injured because of 
negligence of University. Risk 
management also handles 
personal property that is 
damaged through negligence of 
university. 



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Ray Nice / Clarion Call 
Parking tickets and campus safety are usually the first issues students associate with Public Safety. 
While patroling is a big part of Public Safety's day, it is only part of their mission. 



The final area that Public 
Safety covers is safety. This does 
not just include campus safety 
but also things such as legal 
compliance and hazard waste 
materials. The safety department 
makes sure that die University is 
in compliance with rules and 
regulations from the Department 
of Environmental Research and 
the Environmental Protection 
Agency. Safety works in 
conjunction with the Biology, 
Chemistry and Physics 
Department in ensuring the 
general welfare of the University 
students. 

According to Martinazzi "for 
every chemical on campus 
including cleaning agents there 
is a way to deal with it. For 
example if there was a 
radioactive spill in Clarion, the 
safety department would assist in 
it's clean up. 

A common misconception 
among the community is that 
Public Safety and the Campus 



Police are two separate 
departments. This is untrue, 
Public Safety and the Campus 
Police are one in the same. 
MarUnazzi said "they are no 
different than any other police 
department. We are a service 
organization here to enhance 
quality of life for the students 
and the employees so they can 
meet educational goals. 

"We are also called at times to 
assist off campus with certain 
incidents. If there is a 
catostrophic occurence we would 
participate with other 



organizations to help control the 
scene." 

During ALF and Homecoming 
Public Safety will clear parking 
lots, put signs up for additional 
parking, control traffic for the 
parade and try to keep a peaceful 
setting. 

During Homecoming they will 
be watching for alcohol 
violations. 

Martinazzi reminded students 
and vistiors that "Public Safety 
is everyone's friend and that we 
are here to help in any way, 
shape or form." 



The Rape Crisis Center is 

located at 1064B East 

Main Street, Clarion 



Last week's story in the Call listed 
the old address 




5th Ave. 
Restaurant 

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Best prices in town! 

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Tuesday 

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Bucket-o-Bud Night 

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University of Pennsylvania 



Students won't be punished for stealing newspapers 



courtesy of 

College Press Service 

The University of Pennsylvania 
has decided not to punish nine 
students who swiped all the 
copies of a campus newspaper 
April 15 to protest a conservative 
columnist's writing. 

Claire Fagin, interim president 
of the university, and Marvin 
Lazerson, interim provost, 
decided this fall to accept the 
recommendation of a special 
faculty judicial officer who said 
no furthur disciplinary action 
should be taken against the 
students. 

However, both administrators 
warned that Penn would move 
quickly to punish any future 
confiscation of campus 
publications. 

"Free expression of ideas is 
essential to the university and to 
American society," Fagin and 
Lazerson said in a joint 
statement. 'The confiscation of 
any publication on campus is 
wrong and will not be tolerated." 



The Daily Pennsylvanian is 
distributed free across campus, 
including residence halls, 
classrooms and administrative 
buildings. 

Last spring, African-American 
students threw the full press run 
- 14,200 copies of the 
independent daily newspaper - 
into trash bins. After learning of 
the incident, the newspaper staff 
moved quickly to print and 
distribute an additional 6,000 
copies. 

Disciplinary charges were filed 
against nine of some 60 students 
who took copies of the 
newspaper from distribution 
sites. The Black Student 
League, a student group, 
organized and sanctioned the 
protest in response to the 
newspaper's policies and 
editorial columns by a 
conservative writer who 
questioned Martin Luther King 
Jr. as a black hero, and his 
comments regarding what he 
said was blacks' preferential 



treatment in admissions and 
disciplinary procedures. 

Officials said Penn was one of 
th 15 U.S. institutions where 
newspapers were seized in recent 
months. Protesters defended the 
actions as political 

demonstrations because they 
charged that the papers were 
biased in news coverage or were 
promoting racism or sexism. 

Howard Arnold, the faculty 
judicial officer, also 
recommended diat the staff and 
management of The Daily 
Pennsylvanian and the Black 
Student League meet to work out 
differences. 

"Communication, dialogue and 
mediation need to become the 
norm on this campus, not the 
exception," Fagin and Lazerson 
said in the statement. 

After talking with the students, 
advisers, faculty and 
administrators, Arnold said he 
concluded that the newspaper 
theft resulted from long-standing 
disagreements between black 



Gay students face challenges 



courtesy of 

College Press Service 



While gay, lesbian, and 
bisexual students have made 
strides for equality on many 
college campuses, the national 
debate on gay rights still impacts 
them greatly, student leaders say. 

Many gay students either have 
to hide their orientation from 
fellow students, faculty, and 
administrators, or if they have 
come out, must remain vigilant 
against those who may harm 
them verbally or physically, 
officials said. 

Several universities and 
colleges have established gay, 
lesbian, and bisexual centers as 
resources both for straight and 
gay people who are trying to 
understand gay issues. 
Additionally, many campuses 
have student organizations, and 
support and social groups, for 
gay students. Even with this 
expanding openness and 
demands students are reporting 
that harassment still exists. 

Activists and scholars say that 
there is still a great 
misconception about who and 
what gay people are, and that the 
problems students face at college 
mirror the problems that gays 



and lesbians have in the "real 
world" concerning job security 
and benifits, housing, parenting, 
safety, and other issues. 

Phil Martin, director of the 
Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual 
Center at Ohio State University 
in Colombus, said the 
University- supported center was 
created so that gay students 
could have a safe environment 
and the greater community could 
better understand issues that 
affect these students. 

"the basic need for the office is 
to provide factual information 
about the gay population," 
Martin said. "People talk about 
myths that we're child molesters. 
The myth is that we are weak 
and sexually deviant. The mydi 
is that women are strong and 
truck drivers. The myth is that 



we are not equal human beings." 
There is no way to accurately 
gauge the number of lesbians, 
gays, and bisexuals in the United 
States- figures range from 1 
percent to 15 percent of the 
overall population. 

Martin and others say the same 
holds true for the college 
population- the exact numbers 
aren't known. But it is safe to 
assume that gay students attend 
almost every institution in the 
nation, Martin and other experts 
in the field said. But that doesn't 
mean that gay students are 
accepted. 

In the past year, there have 
been setbacks for the gay rights, 
officials say. Ohio Northern 
University voted to deny student 
government recognition of the 
Gay and Lesbian alliance. 



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Students, the student editors and 
the university. 

Arnold said he found students 
on both sides of the dispute were 
genuinely open to discussions to 
find common ground, so there 
was no furthur need for 
disciplinary action. 

"Mistakes by students must be 
seen more as opportunities for 
education than as occasions for 
punishment," he said. 

Former Penn President 
Sheldon Hackney, who is now 
chairman of the National 
Endowment for the Humanities, 
has been criticized for his 



handling of racial tensions and 
free speech issues that arose last- 
year when he was still head of 
the university. 

Last spring, five black students 
dropped charges of racial 
harassment against a white 
student who called them "water 
buffalo," saying they did not 
believe they could get a fair 
hearing on the issue. 

The white student said he did 
not consider "water buffalo" to 
be a racial slur, and he simply 
wanted the women to slop 
making noise outside his dorm 
room. 



CUP students favor 
moving mid-semester 
break to ALF week 



by Christin Mihon 
News Writer 



A recent area of student 
concern has been the possibility 
of having mid-semester break 
coincide with the Friday of 
Autumn Leaf Festival. 

In an opinion poll of 100 
students by random phone calls 
to dormitory rooms across 
campus, 48 percent of students 
interviewed thought that having 



the Friday of ALF week off was 
a good idea, 26 percent did not 
think it was a good idea and 13 
percent were neutral. 

A formal poll is under 
consideration by Student Senate 
and would be conducted in 
conjuction with senate elections. 
The results of that vote would 
be taken into consideration by 
university officials, who would 
make the final decision on 
moving Uie holiday. 



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Ray Henderson / Clarion Call 
Student Senate President Gara L. Smith displays the 
collection of kazoos that will be given out at this siaturday's 
Homecoming game against Bioomsburg. A portion of the 
novelty music makers will be retained for the fans who 
attend the football against Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania on Nov. 13. 



Public Safety 



Blotter 



The following is a brief synopsis of criminal investigations 
conducted by Public Safety for the weeic of Sept. 27, through Oct. 
03, 1993. 

A love seat was reported missing on Sept. 28 from the TV room of 
Wilkinson Hall. This seat has been missing for three weeks. The value 
of the love seat is approximately $500.00. The item is green in color 
and has wooden arm rests. 

A fire alarm pull station was activated on the fourth floor of Nair 
Hall at approximately 5:54 a.m. on Oct. 2. The incident is under 
investigation. 



If anyone has any information concerning these or other crimes, 
please contact Public Safety at 226-2111. 



SEX 

A group discussion witli tlie 

Newman Association 

October 12, 7:00 l#.2n. 

248 Gremmell 

All welcome! 



. 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 9 



Outside Clarion 



Yeltsin crushes revolt in bloody shoot-out 



courtesy of 
Associated Press 



International 

Yeltsin defeats revolt 

Boris Yeltsin won a bloody 
victory in the battle for Russia's 
future Monday, as his army 
crushed hard-line opponents 
barricaded in the Russian White 
House. 

Scores of former-communinists 
died as Yeltsin defeated the 
strongest bid yet designed to 
unseat him. 



Mubarak secure 

Egyptians voted Monday in a 
referendum that is widely 
expected to hand President 
Hosni Mubarak a third six year 
term. 

Police stepped up security to 
protect against attacks by 
Muslim militants who have 
mounted a violent campaign to 
topple the government and 
replace it with a strict Islamic 
state. 

Voting, which was light in 
Cairo, but heavier outside the 
city, passed without incident. 



Argentine mandate 

President Carlos Menem, 
exulting in his Peronist Party's 
solid victory in congressional 
elections, zeroed in Monday on 
amending the constitution to 
allow him a second term in 1995. 

The Peronists defeated the 
Civic Radical Union, the leading 
opposition party, by nearly 12 
points in Sunday's election. 

With 82 percent of polls 
reporting, official returns gave 
the Peronists 42.2 percent of the 
total vote cast. 




courtesy of 

College Press Service 



Heisman 
Trophy winner returns 

After 20 years, a Heisman 
Trophy winner is back in the 
classroom at the University of 
Nebraska-Lincoln working 
toward a degree that he never 
received, according to The 
Nebraskan, the UNL newspaper. 
Former Comhusker wingbacker 
Johnny Rogers, 42, who was 
awarded the Heisman Trophy in 
1972 for being the best college 
player in the country, said he 
regrets not completing the 
coursework for his degree, and 
this time he'll stay in school until 
he completes his education. 

Rogers, a Lincoln resident, is 
president of the Omaha-based 
Malcolm X Memorial 
Foundation. 

His education is being paid for 
by the Northeastern University 
Center for the Study of Sport in 
Society. 



NBC's Bryant Gumbel named 
trustee 

NBC "Today" show host 
Bryant Gumbel has been elected 
to serve on the board of trustees 
of Bates College, the Lewiston, 
Maine school were he received a 
bachelor's degree in history in 
1970. 

Gumbel, who has anchored 
"Today" since 1982, longer than 
any other host, was awarded an 
honorary degree from Bates in 
1986. 

Pot plants found at Ithaca 
College 

Who ever was having a high 
old time in the woods of the 
Ithaca College campus has 
probably hit an all-time low this 
fall. 

Over 290 neatly potted 
marijuana plants, with an 
estimated street value of 
$400,000, were discovered in a 
densely wooded lot on the 
southern edge of the campus. 



Students walk in silence 



More than 650 students and 
faculity members silently 
marched across the Appalachian 
State University campus in 
memory of a student who lost 
her life to violence four years 
ago. 

The silent march has been held 
every fall since Jeni Gray, an 
Appalachian student, was 
abducted and murdered in the 
fall of 1989. 

The crowd included a student 
who was abducted and sexually 
assaulted by the man who 
murdered Gray. 



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National 

U.S. troops killed in Somalia 

The Pentagon ordered fresh 
infantry, aerial gunships and top- 
of-the-line tanks to Somalia 
Monday to bolster U.S. forces 
after at least 12 Americans were 
killed, 78 wounded and others 
captured in the fiercest fighting 
since the mission began. 

The casualties, inflicted by the 
forces of warlord Mohamed 
Farrah Aidid, were the most for 
the United States in such a short 
period since the Persian Gulf 
War. The battle began late 
Sunday and lasted into Monday. 
On Capitol Hill, some 
lawmakers called for U.S. 
withdrawal, but President 
Clinton insisted American forces 
would remain until order was 
restored. 

"Americans by the dozens are 
paying with their lives and limbs 
for a misplaced policy," said 
Sen. Robert C. Byrd, D-W.Va. 

Senate minority leader Bob 
Dole, R-Kan., said, "It seems to 
me that it's time to take a hard, 
hard look on why we're still 
there. 

"It's gone from a humanitarian 
mission to almost an outright 
armed conflict, and it seems to 
me Congress and the 
administration ought to come to 
grips with this and make a 
decision one way or another." 

Clinton defended sending the 
reinforcements. 



Viet envoy visits D.C. 

The highest ranking 
Vietnamese vistor since the end 
of the war was urged by 
Secretary of State Warren 
Christopher Monday to 
cooperate further in providing an 
accounting for missing American 
servicemen. 

State Department spokesman 
Mike McCurry said Vietnam has 
been accelerating its 
cooperation, but added Vietnam 
must do more. 

Trade center bombing trial 
started 

A prosecutor pointed one-by- 
one to four Muslim 
fundamentalists charged in the 
World Trade Center bombing 
and said Monday their "war of 
terrorism" had shattered 
America's sense of security. 

Some of the defendants, 
Mohammad Salameh, 26, 
Ahmad Ajaj, 27, Mahmud 
Abouhalima,33, and Nidal 
Ayyad,25, shook their heads 
several times during the 
prosecutor's opening statements 
but otherwise showed no 
emotion. 

Defense lawyers maintained 
the men's innocence. 

The bombing occurred as tens 
of thousands of people in the 
world's second tallest building 
were going about their lunchtime 
business. The Feb. 26 blast killed 
six people. 



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Page 10 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1 



1 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 11 



harp minds 
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Page 12 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



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Ninja Turtles 



Sportscenter 



Major Dad q 



Ch. Flag 



Wings q 



*V2 'When Time Ran Out" (1980) Paul Newman PG 



Auto Racing 



Murder, She Wrote q 



X-Files Jersey Devil' q [Mama 



Mama 



Secrets ot Lake Success A Taste of Honey ' q 



**'/; "The Reward" (1965. Drama) l^ax von Sydow. 



Auto Racing: SODA 



Newsg 



News 



Newsg 



Chevy Chase 



11:30 



Sanders 



Cheers q 



12:00 



Comedy Jam 



Nightline q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In 



Edition 



In Stereo) q 



Stereo) q 



Late Show q 



Love Con. 



News g [Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



[Timber [Harness Racirig 



**V2 "ThinpsAre Tough All Over' {^362) 



Sportscenter [Baseball Fair 



Linda (1993, Suspense) Virginia Madsen (In Stereo) q [* 'Pick-Up Surnmer" (1981. Comedy) 



***V2 "The Petrified Forest (1936) 



Guts 



**'; "Arthur 2 or^ the Rocks' (1988) Dudley Moore 



What You Do 



Supermarket 



Looney 



SATURDAY EVENING OCTOBER 9, 1993 



Shop-Drop 



*'/? "Once Upon a Crime (1992) PG q 



■Night and the City" (1992) Robert De Niro R' q |o*'/; A/exf of Km (1989. Drama) Patrick Swavze 'r' n'l Pnnrnrn 

<rx r-i rkrie r>A«> ■/«.,„ n^>t^,^ /<nmi /^".u._ r,. l^.i. : — 7. — X: : r- " ■' — rr- 'J ' 



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Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Partridge 



Chris Cross 



Get Smart 



L.A. Law F B 



"Love Matters (1993) Gnffin Dunne 



Dragnet 



iBob Newhart [M.T. Moore 



Fallen Ange ls 



M.T. Moore 



'? "High Anxiety" (1977, Comedy) Mel Brooks 



(in Stereo) q 



Van Dyke 



"Miracle Beach 0992) 



Lucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteries 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



4: 



Time Afte' Time (1979) Malcolm McDowell. PG 



(3 30) College Football Michigan at Michigan State (Live 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



Regarding ^cnry' (1991) Harrison Ford PG-13 q 



10 



11 



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[Dream Team II Selection 



Major League Baseball Playoffs; NLCS Game 3 



News 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game 3 
(300) More-Graffiii i Baywatch Blmdside 



14 



17 



College Football 



(2 30) 



±L 



Dream Team II Selection 



News 



News : 



NBC News 



CBS News 



CBS News 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



News 



Fathom (1967. Adventure) Tony Franciosa 



18 



Horse Rat 1 Senior PGA Golf: Transamenca Ch ■■ Second Rouna 



21 



22 



13 00) 



The Accused (1988. Drama) Jodie Foster 



Major Dad q 



25 



(3 30) **'? 
! Can't on TV 



|*«* "The Butchers Wile (1991) Demi Moore PG 13 



Sweet Talker 



Arcade 



26 **v? VHF (1989. 



Cornedy 



NBC News 



News 



Night Court 



Court TV 



Wh. Fortune 



Untouchables Stir Crazy 



Crusaders 



Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



Jeopardy! q |Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



♦ ♦* 



The Last ot the Mohicans" (1992. Adventure) R' 



**"•? "Three Fugitives" (1989. Comedy) Nick Nolte. g 



Mommies q [Cafe Ame. [Empty Nest [Nurses 



10:00 



10:30 



Tracey Ullman; New Yort( 



Commish ' Scali, PI 



Sisters "Demons' 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game 4 White Sox at Blue Jays 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game 4 White Sox at Blue Jays 



Cops g Cops (R) g 



Mommies 1 



***V2 "Splendor in the Grass ' (1961, Drama) Natalie Wood. 



Cafe Ame. 



Sportscenter 



Wings q 



Front Page (In Stereo) g 



Empty Nest j Nurses q 



Comic Strip: Late Night 



Sisters Demons q 



Football ""[College Football Florida ai Louisiana Slate (Live) 



Th e Big Picture (1989) Kevin Bacon PG-13 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



**'/2 'Lonely Hearts" (1991) R g 



Newsg 



News 



News 



News : 



Golden Giris [Empty Nest 



fe 



Saturday Night Live 



Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



Untouchables Stir Crazy 



Arsenio Hall (In Stereo) g [Music 



News g [Saturday Night Live 



Case Closed q 



The Jeik (1979. Comedy) Steve Martin 



[Football Scoreboard 



"Ghostbusters (1984) Bill Murray 



Silk Stalkings Social Call 



[Sportscenter [Horse 



Return to the Blue Lagoon (1991 ) Milla Jovovich 



The Golden Child (1986) PG-13 |** Doni Tell Mom the Babysitter s Dead (1991) q ' "Ring of Fire II Blood and Steel 



"Barbaretia (1966) Jane Fonda 



Double Dare [Wild Side 



AI Yankovic 



Salute 



[Legends 



Doug 



■Iron Eagle (1986) Louis Gossett Jr PG13 



[Rugrats 



.L. 



Clarissa 



[Roundhouse 



Universal Soldier (1992) R 



Boxing 



(1992) \ The Final Alliance (19901 



Bare Essentials" (1991 Comedy) Gregory Harrison [** The Fatal Image (1990 Drama) Michele Lee 



Ren-Stimpy [You Atraid? {Very Very Nick at Nite 



Hidden 



Hidden [Unsolved Mysteries 



Gladiator 



Superman 



China Beach 



SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 10, 1993 



_ *: 00 

i3 4bi'»*' 



X 



430 



5:00 



5:30 I 6:00 I 



6:30 



ITBA 



7^ I _7j30 

Stealing Home " (1988) q [ Superman // (1 960) Criminals trom Krypiontake over the U S A PG' 



[Sports Fol. I Monsters ol Gridiron [News:; [ABC News 



J_ 

6 _ [NFL F ootball San Diego C harger s at Pittsburgh Steel ers Fr om Three River s Stadium" 

~7 ' " ' 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game 5 White Sox at Blue Jays 



8 Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game 5 White So< at Blue Jays 



10_ 

"11 



A Fine Mess ii966 Comedy) Ted Danson 



[Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



14 1(2 30i 



NFL Football San Diego Chargers at Pittsburgh Steelers From Three Rivers Stadium 



17 

21 



'Horse R 

'000, 



Ghostbusters (1964. Comedy) Bill Murray PG 



[Senior PGA Golt: Transamenca Chmp - Final Hound 



(2 30' 



The •=''ck Up Artist [Ten of Us [Two Dads 



22 
25 

26 



' '3 3Ch_* *_ Masters ot Menace 
Can't on TV [Arcade 



Curly Si>e (1991) James Belushi q 



1990) Ready or Not 



(3 00) Outrage' (1986) 



Double Dare Freshmen 



Maior Dad : 



Short Sub. 



Soccer 



Wings : 



Videos [Am. Funniest 



Witness Video (In Stereo) 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) q 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) q 



Brisco County, Jr 



Fifth Quarter Video 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



♦ ♦'■2 



Christopher Columbus The Discovery (1992) 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



Lois & Clark-Superman S^ame^i;/ Secrefs (1993. Drama) Joanna Kerns 



"Under Siege (1992) Steven Seaga l 



Baseball '93 



Baseball '93 



Martin g 



Seaquest DSV (In Stereo) ] The Flood Who Will Save Our Children'^ (1993, Drama) 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game 4 Teams TBA 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game 4 Teams TBA 



Living Single 



Seaquest DSV (In Stereo) 



"A Fistful Ol Dollars (1967) Clml Eastwood. 'R' 



NFL 



[ Drag Racing: NHRA 



Married... 



Dearest 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



The Flood. Who Will Save Our Children''" (1993. Drama) 



»*'/? Used Cars (1980. Comedy) Kurt Russell R' 



Auto Racing IMSA Camel GT Grand Prix of Phoenix 



Nickel i Dime (1992) C Thomas Howell PG 



Linda (1993. Suspense) Virginia Madsen (In Stereo) c; [Case Closed (R) 



Chris Cross | ** E ne mo Man (1992) Sean Astin PG 



Rocko's Life 



Legends [You Afraid? [Roundhouse 



Pancho Barnes (1988) A California debutante becomes a pioneer in aviation 



:jL 



**'•? '/wpu/se ' (1990. Suspense) Theresa Russell R : 



Death Becomes Her (1992) PG-13 



Nick News [Mori( 



Lucy Show 



Goldie Hawn 



Van Dyke 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) q 



News :; 



News 



News 



News q 



Paid Prog. 



News 



11:30 



12:00 



Red Rock Wesf"(1993)g 



Cheers q 



Cheers : 



Siskel 



Murphy B. 



Paid Prog. 



Rescue 911 



Dear John q 



Night Court 



Murphy B. 



Lifestyles 



FYI Pitt. 



Suspect 



**V2 The Black Windmill" (1974) PG' 



Sportscenter 



*v? Whore' (1991) Theresa Russell 



Silk Stalkings Social Call 



"Criss Cross (1992) Goldie Hawn R 



M.T. Moore 



*»»'/? "Four Friends (1981. Drama) Craig Wasson. Jodi Thelen 



Bob Newhart 



Hidden 



Dragnet 



Paid Prog. 



NFL 



Hollywood 



»'/; '6/ac/(&e/f ' (1992) R 



* "House /!/( 1992) R q 



A. Hitchcock 



Paid Prog. 



Superman 



Paid 



Prog. 



MONDAY EVENING OCTOBER 11, 1993 



4:00 
[Life Stones 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



^ 



** Rocket Gibraltar (1988. Drama) PG 



7:30 



Donahue (In Stereoi q jNews q 



j—f 



Empty Nest I Cheers 



Coach 



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iNews 



News 



Seems Like Old Times (1980) Goidie Hawn PG 



'News 



jMajor^ Leagu e Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game 5 
3 : Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game 5 
10 I Tom- Jerry j Tiny Toon j Animaniacs [Batman: 



[(3301*^ 



Cur. Affair iNews : 



News 



I ABC News 



NBC News 



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Full House ! 



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\T ; Ma»Out(Ri i DreamLg. jChallenge 



18 
2f 



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(3 00^ 



22 



25 
26 



i2i0. 



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Roseanne q [Roseanne q 



NBC News 



Battle hi tne Planet of the Apes (1973) 



Jeopardy! q 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



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Am.Journal 



Married. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



T30 T 



9:00 



9:30 



r*'^? Boyz N the Hood (1991) Cuba Go oding Jr R_ 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



I Am a Promise: Children of Stanton 



Day One : 



11:30 



12:00 



7r)r7ocenf 8toocf' (1992) R 



Fresh Prince 



Shade 



Shade 



Blossom q 



Dave's 



Dave's 



NFL Football Houston Oilers at Buffalo Bills From Rich Stadium (In Stereo Live) q [News g 



Moment of Truth A Child Too Many (1993. Drama) q 



Murphy B. j Lo ve i War Northern Exposure q 

Miirnhu R^ Hnva K War Nnrfharn P<nnciir<i n 



"Short Time (1990. Comedy) Dabney Coleman 



Murphy B. [Love 4 War Northern Exposure q 



Fresh Prince [Blossom q 



Max Out 



Facts of Life 



"Memoirs of an Invisible Man' (1992) 



Driving Me Crazy (1991) PG 
Crazy Kids [Hey Dude (R)|Guts 



»*'7 



" SpaceCamp (1986. Adventure) Kate Capshaw 



Th'breds 



Ninja Turtles 



Up Close 



Murder by Death" {W&. Comedy) Peter Falk. PG 



Ninja Turtles 



Sportscenter 



Major Dad q 



NFL Prime Monday 



Wings q 



"Superdome (1978, Suspense) David Janssen 



WarGames (1983) Matthew Broderick PG 



What You Do 



Supermari(et 



Looney 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Murder, She Wrote g 



Mama 



Mama 



"Moment ol Truth A Chi l d Too Many' (1993, Drama) : 



How to Murder Your Wile (1965) Jack Lemmon 



Expedition Earth 



Buify the Vampire Slayer' (1992) q 



WWF: Monday Night Raw 



'■'? "Housesitter (1992) Steve Martin 



Amazing Games (R) 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) q 



**< 2 



Goldie Hawn 



Leather Jackets" {\990. Drama) R 



Partridge [Get Smart 



LA. Law Cold Shower 



Dragnet [Bob Ne whart 



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News 



News: 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In 



Edition 



Chevy Chase (In Stereo) q 



News 



Stereo) q 



Late Show q 



Love Con. 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



0*1/2 Swing Shift" (1984) Goldie Hawn. 



Timber 



Major Dad : 



Sportscenter 



Wings q [Odd Couple 



"Iron Maze (1991) Jeff Fahey. R' 



"Shampoo" (1975, Comedy) Warren Beatty. 'R' 



»V2 "Whos That Girf (1987. Comedy) Madonna 



M.T.Moore [M.T.Moore Van Dykte [Lucy Show 



TUESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 12, 1993 



[Unsolved Mysteries 



Scannrs 2 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteries 



4:00 



Ullman 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



The Right Stuff (1983) An account of the 



Empty Nest [Cheers: 



J 

6 iSchoolbreak Special 
iT"' 



Oprah Winfrey q 



II 



14 



17 



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Geraldo 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Animaniacs 



Batman ; 



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(3 301 



Swing Shi ft (1984) PG' 



Max O ut .' Ri jDream Lg. [Challenge 



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26 



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training of America s first astronauts PG 



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NBC News Jeopardy! q 



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Full House : 



Newsq 



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♦ ♦'7 



Nin)a Turtles 



;310i.«» Ghostbusters (1984) PG 



Uptown Saturday Nigtit ' (19"4) Sidney Poitier 



Muppets [Crazy Kids [Hey Dude (R) 



Guts 



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Ninja Turtles 



Hard Copy q 



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CBS News 



Roseanne q 



Jeopardy! q 



7:30 



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8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Full House q 



The Last ol the Mohicans ' (1992, Adventure) R 



Saved-Bell 



Phenom g 



Getting By q 



Roseanne g [Coach q 



Larroquette [Second Half 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



*** 



■Where the Day Takes You (1992) 



NYPD Blue q 



Dateline (In Stereo) g 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game 6 Blue Jays at White Sox 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game 6 Blue Jays at White Sox 



Roc g 



Saved-Bell 



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*** 



Getting By : 



Thats Lite' (1986. Drama) Jack Lemmon. PG-13 



Sportscenter 



America's Most Wanted q 



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Dateline (In Stereo) g 



■The Kremlin Letter (1970) Bibi Anderson. PG' 



Major Dad q 



NHL Hockey Buffalo Sabres at Philadelphia Flyers From the Spectrum. (Live) 



Newsq 



News 



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News q 



Chevy Chase 



11:30 



12:00 



Tracey Ullman: New York 



Cheers g [Nightline g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



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(In Stereo) g 



Stereo) g 



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Love Con. 



News g [Tonipht Show (In Stereo) g 



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[What You Do 



** Christine Cromwell In Vino Veritas (1990, Mystery) [Supertnarttet 



Western) Gene Hackman (In Stereo) PG 



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Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Murder, She Wrote g 



[Boxing (Live) 



[Sportsnight 



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"Sins o/Pesire" (1992) NR 



[Major Dad q 



»* "Raw Nerve (1991) Ted Prior R 



M.T. Moore M.T. Moore 



♦ ♦♦ 



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Wings q [Odd Couple 



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"Raising Carr?' (1992) q 



Lucy Show 



WEDNESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 13, 1993 



Unsolved Mysteries 



A. Hitchcock 



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4:00 



(2 151 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



Donahue (in Stereo) q 



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Empty Nest [Cheers q [ Coach g 



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liL. 



[Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game 6 



1" 
n 

14 



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6:30 



7:00 



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ABC News 



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Full House q 



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(3 00i 



Dream Lg. 



Ghostbusters (1984 Comedy) BiH Murray PG 



Pyramid 



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Max Out 



Facts of Lite 



Hostage Flight (1985) Ned Beatty 



22_r**» Darji Victory (1939 Drama i Dette Davis 



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26 I**' '^-leflv.vd Blues 



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8:00 



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Doc Ho/Zywootf (1991 



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[Joe's Life q 



) Michael J Fox PG-13' g 



Unsolved Mysteries : 



Home Imp [Grace Under 



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10:00 



Crypt Tales 



10:30 



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Moon Over Miami g 



Law k Order Profile g 



Major League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game 7 Blue Jays at White Sox 



Maior League Baseball Playoffs: ALCS Game 7 Blue Jays at White Sox 



Beveriy Hills, 90210 q 



Unsolved Mysteries q 



«»»'/; Tt)e Adventures of Baron Munchausen (1989) John Neville 



Up Close 



Ninja Turtles 



Sportscenter PBA Bowling: 



Major Dad r; , Wings q 



"Curly Sue (1991. Comedy) James Belushi PG g 



The Purple Rose ol Cairo ( 1 98 5) 



What You Do 



Loortey 



Looney 



Stories 



Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Suncoast Senior Open 



Melrose Place (In Stereo) g 



Now-T. Brokaw & K. Couric 



Mama 



I Mama 



Law & Order Profile 



**V7 "Risky Business ( 1 983, Comedy) Tom Cruise R 



Boxing (Live) 



*»'/2 Havana (1990) A gambler begins a risky affair with a Cuban revolutionary q 



11:00 



Dream On q 



Newsq 



News 



News 



News q 



Chevy Chase 



11:30 



12:00 



Red Rock West (1993) g 



Cheers g | Nightline g 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



Late Show (In Stereo) g 



Edition 



In atereo) q 



Late Show g 



Love Con. 



News q [Tonight Show (In Stereo) g 



*»*''2 Doctor Zhivago (1965) PG 



Speedweek 



Major Dad q 



**'/2 The Panama Deception (1992) |**'/2 '/Vex/ oi| Km" (1989, Drama) Patrick Swayze R"~q 



Husbands and Wives [\ 992) Woody Allen R q 



Partridge [Get Smart 



LA. Law 



Dragnet [Bob Newhart 



love Matters (1993) Gnffm Dunne 



M.T. Moore [M.T. Moore 



She Knows Too Much (1989. Comedy-Qiama) 



Van Dyke 



Sportscenter 



Wings q 



Timber 



Odd Couple 



White Men Can t Jump g 



Freddy's Dead 



Lucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



A. Hitchcock 



Mysteri es 



1 









The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Pagel3 



Lifestyle 



'Love Letters ' portrays childhood friendships 



by Ray Henderson 
Lifestyles Writer 



The Clarion University 
Theatre's presentation of "Love 
Letters", by A.R. Gumey made 
its debut at the Hart Chapel on 
Tuesday evening. 

"Love Letters" is a very emo- 
tional story about a determined, 
goal-oriented man and an emo- 
tional, rebellious woman whose 
relationship exists mainly on 
paper. The two begin by passing 
notes back and forth to one 
another in grade school, and 
their written relationship blos- 
soms and perseveres for many 
years 

Both are upper-class children 
born of prominent families, 
whose parents have their whole 
lives planned out for them. 
Andy (Michael Lee Martin) and 
Melissa (Marion K. Russell) are 
sent away to academies, summer 
camps and dancing schools, all 
the while holding their relation- 
ship together through the mail 
despite the many miles that sepa- 
rate them. 




University Relations photo 
Michael Martin and Marion Russell play childhood friends who keep in touch despite the 
changes in life and its rewards and consequences in the drama "Love Letters." 

As they mature physically and both leave home to begin college 



emotionally, so does their rela- 
tionship and their writing. They 



Homecoming Queen : 

An Autumn Leaf Tradition 



by Amy Gerkin 
Lifestyles Editor 



It's that time again — twelve 
young women are competing for 
the Homecoming Queen crown 
and all its glory. 

The court is chosen by various 
clubs or organizations on cam- 
pus. Through a method of vot- 
ing and elimination, the student 
body decides who will be their 
next Homecoming Queen. 

Senior attendants are Merrilyn 
Murnyack, communication 
major sponsored by Alpha 
Sigma Tau, Elizabeth Hughes, 
psychology major sponsored by 
Panhellenic Council, and Delila 
Greco, elementary education 
major sponsored by the dance 
team. 

Junior attendants are Carrie 
Van Verth, communications 
major sponsored by Panhellenic 
Council and Kristen Duncan, 
elementary education major 
sponsored by Alpha Sigma Tau. 

Sophomore attendants are 
Angela Shaffer, nursing major at 



the Venango campus, Laurie 
Marmo, early childhood/ ele- 
mentary education major, Gina 
DeBacco, elementary/ early 
childhood education major spon- 
sored by Delta Zeta, and Amy 
Bowser, political science/ history 
major sponsored by Delta Phi 
Epsilon. 

Freshman attendants are 
Kristen Kulling, elementary edu- 
cation/ special education major 
from Venango campus. Colleen 
Hiteshew, medical technology 
major sponsored by Zeta Tau 
Alpha, and Tracy D'Ambrosio, 
geriatrics major sponsored by the 
dance team. 

Clarion University will aown 
their Homecoming Queen and 
present her court at the 
Homecoming Dance tonight at 
10:30 p.m. in the Gemmell 
Mulli-Purpose room. The dance 
will run from 9 p.m. to midnight. 
The Homecoming court will be 
presented again at the football 
game on Saturday, October 9 
during halftime. 



and to pursue different careers 
and lead different lives. Andy 
joins the Navy and goes on to 
law school and a successful 
career, and Melissa pursues a 
career as an artist while she is in 
and out of various schools. 
Eventually, they each marry. 



Andy raises a family and enters 
politics, and is eventually elected 
to the United States Senate. 
Melissa's life, however, does not 
turn out to be as stable as that of 
her loving penpal. Melissa 
struggles with her career, and her 
marriage ends in alcoholism and 
divorce, breaking apart her fami- 



ly, her spirit, and her heart. For 
many years, the once flowering 
correspondence between Andy 
and Melissa is reduced to a rela- 
tionship consisting only of 
Christmas cards and hastily 
penned notes. 

Later in their lives, they once 
again become close, engaging in 
a behind-the-scenes affair. 
Unfortunately, Melissa is 
encumbered with a heavy load of 
emotional baggage, and Andy is 
too worried about his future in 
politics to risk the scandal that 
would inevitably occur were he 
to nurture a physical relationship 
with her. The press finds out 
about their affair, and they break 
apart. They are once again con- 
fined to what they can express to 
one another through pen and 
paper, this time for the rest of 
their lives. 

"Love Letters," which was 
directed by Mary Hardwick, is a 
quality production. Its simple 
stage set and one-on-one inter- 
play lend themselves well to inti- 
macy and emotion found in this 
story of a love held together only 
with perseverance and ink. 

"Love Letters" will be present- 
ed nightly at the Hart Chapel 
Theater through Saturday, 
October 9 at 8 p.m. 




University Relations photo 
The 1993 Homecoming Court: (front from left)Angela Shaffer, Marrilyn Murnyack, Amy 
Bowser, Elizabeth Hughes, Gina DeBacco, and Tracy D'Ambrosio. (Back from left): Delita 
Greco, Colleen Hiteshew, Laurie Marmo, Kristen Kulling, Carrie Van Verth, Kristen Duncan. 



Page 14 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Two new faculty members welcomed to staff 



by Ron Santillo 
Ufestyles Writer 



Clarion University faculty is 
happy to welcome two new 
members to its staff. Joyce 
Jablonski has joined the staff as 
director of the Sandford Art 
Gallery and as an art department 
faculty member. Dr. Richard 
DeLuca has joined on as a pro- 
fessor of education and director 
of the Center of Educational 
Leadership. 

A native of Brookfield, Ohio, 
Jablonski is quite familiar with 
Uie Clarion area because she vis- 
ited Cook Forest often as she 
was growing up. Jablonski 
received a B.F.A. degree in 
ceramics from Youngstown State 
University. She also earned her 
M.F.A. degree in ceramic sculp- 
ture and drawing from the 
University of Texas at San 
Antonio, Texas. She will be 
teaching all levels of sculpture 
and 3-D design here at Clarion. 

While attending an art confer- 
ence in Yuma, Arizona, 

Jablonski met Cathy Joslyn, the 
chair of the Clarion University 

Art Department and faculty 

member Gary Greenburg. 



Jablonski 's teaching experience 
ranges from kindergarten 
through the university level. 
During the past year, she has 
been lecturing and leading work- 
shops at Lakeside Studio in 
Chicago, Illinois, where she 
served as an administrator and in 
charge of international art 
exchange. 

Prior to her work at Lakeside 
Studio, Jablonski has served as 
instructors and teaching assis- 
tants at various colleges and art 
centers in Michigan and Texas. 
She has received national and 
international art show awards for 
her works which have been dis- 
played in Texas, Illinois, 
Michigan, California, Ohio, 
Kansas and New Mexico, as well 
as in Canada and the former 
Soviet Union. Along with her 
art, she has also delivered many 
slide shows and lectures 
throughout the U.S. 

Jablonski feels that the 
Sandford Gallery is a nice size 
gallery with a lot of potential. 
She would like it to be a teaching 
gallery focusing on contempo- 
rary works, and depending on 

the budget, she would like to 
bring individual artists with the 





CEmR POINT 

Performers •Musicians 
Technicians • Berenstain Bears*** 
Specialty/Comic Performers 

Kent, Ohio 

Friday, Nov. 12, 1993 
Kent State University 
Student Center - Third Floor 
Auditions & Interviews: 2:30 - 4:30 pm 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Saturday, Nov. 13, 1993 

Point Park College 

Studio #104 

Musician Auditions: 3:00 - 5:00 pm 

Performer Auditions: 5:00 - 7:00 pm 

Technician & Berenstain Bear 

Interviews: 3:00 - 7:00 pm 

Columbus, Ohio 

Sunday, Nov. 14, 1993 

Holiday Inn On The Lane 

328 W. Lane Avenue 

Musician Auditions: 3:30 - 5:00 pm 

Performer Auditions: 5:00 - 6:30 pm 

Technician & Berenstain Bear 

Interviews: 3:30 - 6:30 pm 

Also At Cedar Point: 

Friday, December 17, 1993 
Friday, January 7, 1994 
Auditions & Inten/iews : 
12:00 - 4:00 pm 

For additional sites and further 
information contact 

Cedar Point Live Shows 

P.O. Box 5006 

Sandusky, OH 44871 -8006 

(419)627-2390 




University relations photo 
Joyce Jablonski and Dr. Richard DeLuca are two new faces 
in the classrooms at Clarion University. 



exhibits. Her conuracts through 
her years in art will enable her to 
obtain exhibits from the Baltic 
and from deep in the heart of 
Mexico. She would like to mix 
what is displayed from folk 
ceramic art in Mexico to works 
by Lativan artists. 

Dr. Richard DeLuca of 
Harrison City will be succeeding 
Dr. Claude Perkins, who took a 
position in St. Louis, Missouri, 
as the director of the center. 

DeLuca did his undergraduate 
work at the University of 
Pittsburgh and St. Vincent 
College, where he received his 
B.A. in history. He later 



received his master's degree in 
education/administration from 
Duquesne University and earned 
his Ph.D. in administration from 
the University of Pittsburgh. 

For the past three years 
DeLuca was the superintendent 
of schools for the Greater 
Johnstown School District. He 
was also employed by the 
Hempfield Area School District 
serving as assistant senior high 
school principal, assistant direc- 
tor of curriculum and instruction, 
administrative assistant and 
assistant superintendent. 

DeLuca is very happy to be 
teaching at the university level 



here at Clarion. "Teaching at a 
college is something that I 
always wanted to do," says 
DeLuca. "When this opportuni- 
ty presented itself, 1 decided to 
pursue it." 

Along with directing the 
Center, DeLuca will teach 
Introduction to Education for the 
Clarion University College of 
Education and Human Services. 

In 1988, the Center for 
Educational Leadership was for- 
mally authorized, which general 
purpose is to establish closer 
relationships with the K-12 
school community and the 
College of Education and 
Human Services. 

DeLuca would like to see the 
Center working with the superin- 
tentents, principals and teachers 
in each of the districts in order to 
assist in providing the best possi- 
ble education to their students. 
DeLuca is looking to visit each 
of the schools in the district to 
meet with superintendents and 
assess all their formal and infor- 
mal needs. 

One of the Center's more pop- 
ular programs is the Program of 
Scholastic Enrichment or POSE. 
The goal of this program is to 
increase post-secondary partici- 
pation of rural students, specifi- 
cally where families do not have 
a history of post-secondary par- 
ticipation. 




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This program will be held in the Gemmell Multi- 
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The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 15 



''Duo Concertante'' features flute and piano soloists 



by Anita Carbon 
Ufestyles Writer 



Clarion University's music 
department will host a guest 
recital, "Duo Concertante," with 
flutist Diane Gold and pianist 
Hanni Schmid-Wyss on Sunday, 
October 10. 

Hanni Schmid-Wyss is interna- 
tionally known, traveling 
throughout the U.S. and Europe 
performing in recitals, chamber 
ensembles and as a soloist in 
orchestras. She graduated with 
her M.S. degree from the Music 
Academy of Zurich in 
Switzerland and received a 



soloist diploma at the Staatliche 
Hochschule fur Musik Cologne 
in Germany. 

In Switzerland, Schmid-Wyss 
won a medal in the International 
Competition at Geneva and 
received first prize in the 
National Competition. Schmid- 
Wyss also plays contemporary 
music and has made several 
recordings. Critics describe her 
as "an artist full of temperment 
with a brilliant technique and at 
the same time very sensitive." 

Diane Gold is a member of the 
musical faculties of Juniata and 
York Colleges, Bucknell and 
Lehigh Universities and the 



Music Academy of State 
College. She is principle flutist 
of York, Altoona and Nittany 
Valley orchestras. Gold has 
recently recorded a second CD, 
"Masques," with the Huntingdon 
Trio of Philadelphia, a chamber 
ensemble at Drexel and Bucknell 
Universities. 

Gold has earned degrees from 
Eastman and Columbia where 
she studied with Julius Baker, 
Joseph Mariano and Albert 
Tipton. She performed in the 
Claire Polin Birthday Tribute in 
January 1991 at Weill Recital 
Hall in New York. Gold has 
played in concerts with the New 



Ponder the meaning of life and college 



by Anji Brown 
Lifestyles Writer 



Philosophy is the exploring of 
the basic truths of life and the 
universe. It reaches above and 
beyond the ordinary thinker. 

Dr. Laurence Thomas is cur- 
rently a professor of philosophy 
at Syracuse University. Thomas' 
unique approach to teaching has 
inspired greater interest among 
his students, and has also made 
his Philosophy 191 the most 
sought-after class on campus. 

Because of his innate ambition 
to create a greater interest, he 
invites groups of students to 
lunch or to his home. Students 
can earn extra aedit by writing a 
three-page essay on any lecture 
subject, and if it is considered to 
be an A then the grade counts. 
(If not, it is forgotten.) Always 
trying to keep the students think- 
ing positively, he sends personal- 
ized letters to those who are 
doing well in his class. 

An incident that occurred one 



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day in Thomas' classroom dis- 
plays his extreme concern for the 
college students' study habits. 
When learning upon his arrival 
of the classroom that 18 out of 
280 plus students in attendance 
indicated that they had read the 
assigned material for the day, 
Thomas walked out of the class- 
room without a word. 

The next day, Thomas brought 
an advertisement from the Daily 
Orange, the Syracuse newspa- 
per, chastising students for what 
he saw as academic indifference, 
and imploring them to be more 
serious in the classroom. His 
advertisement was met with 
praise and support from his col- 
leagues, students and media. 

Thomas received his B.A. from 
the University of Maryland and 
he acquired his M.A. and Ph.D. 
from the University of 
Pittsburgh. He also received an 
honorary L.L.D. from New 
England College. He previously 
held jobs as a professor of phi- 



losophy at Oberlin College, the 
University of Maryland and the 
University of Notre Dame. 

Dr. Laurence Thomas is a hard 
working professor who is always 
striving for excellence in his stu- 
dents. He has chosen to be a 
guest speaker at Clarion 
University. This visit is to be 
paid for through a grant from the 
Clarion University Foundation. 

The lecture given by Thomas, 
"Moral Deference and the art of 
Excellence," will be held at the 
Hart Chapel Theatre at 7 p.m. on 
Monday, October 11. It will 
cover contemporary moral prob- 
lems and the ideals of liberal 
education. The lecture is free 
and open to the public. A recep- 
tion will follow the lecture at 
Moore Hall. On Tuesday, 
Thomas will be visiting classes 
on campus to meet with the stu- 
dents. 

If you enjoy pondering the 
meaning of life, this is a lecture 
you just cannot miss. 



Pittsbmgh Playhouse presents 

Disney's Aladdhi-Friday. October 8. 7:30-9:30 

Coneheads-Saturday, October 9, 7:30-9:30 

The Philadelphia Story-Sunday, October 10. 7:30-9:30 

A Clockwork Orange-Monday. October 11, 7:30 only 

Films $3. ticket info call (412) 621-6601 



DEsicninc mmos 



ZS' Tanning Special ^^ 



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15 Sessions for $25 ^ 
October thru November 



Philadelphia String Quartet. 

Gold has taught maslerclasses 
to advanced students throughout 
the U.S. and Europe, and to stu- 
dents at Oxford University dur- 
ing the spring of 1993. She will 
perform Carl Reinecke's 
"Concerto for Flute" as a guest 
soloist with the Altoona 
Symphony on March 12, 1994. 

The program will include 
"Suite Mondale" by Ernest 
Block, "Anante in C Major, 
KV315" by Wolfgang Amadeus 
Mozart, and more. Schmid- 
Wyss will perform a piano solo, 
"Variations on 'un air Allemand' 
for solo piano" by Fredrick 



Chopin and Gold will perform 
Claude-Achille Debussy's 
"Syrinx for solo flute." 

The recital and mastcrclasscs 
presented by Diane Gold and 
Hanni Schmid-Wyss were 
arranged and co-ordinaicd by 
assistant professor of music. Dr. 
Brent Register. 

Schmid-Wyss and Gold's 
"Duo Concertante" is made pos- 
sible through a grant from the 
Clarion University Foundation. 
The guest recital is free and open 
to the public on Sunday, Oclober 
10 at 8:15 p.m. in the Hart 
Chapel Theatre. 



Honie coining Dance 



Thtirsday, October 7 9-midnight 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 

Homecoming Queen and her court will 
be presented-crowning at 10:30 p.m. 




I'^it m e a sures /b4,ii7 miles ,rt jiAme^rer. 4*^^pi-J 



1 



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m^ UNIVERSITY BOOK CENTER • GEM.MttL CO.MPLLX • PAYNE SMH T 



Page 16 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 17 



Student senators : the voices of the campus 



by Toni Ross 
IJfestyles Writer 



The Student Senate here at 
Clarion University plays an 
important role in most of the 
decisions made by the adminis- 
tration. Each student senator is 
responsible for making sure that 
all decisions are made with con- 
cern for the welfare of the stu- 
dent body. Three of those elect- 
ed senators — James Smith, 
Angela Link and Katrina 
Helmick — have specific ideas 
about what they can do to help 
all students here at Clarion. 

James Smith is a senior ele- 
mentary education major and he 
became a student senator 
because he wanted "to get 
involved and make a difference." 
Smith believes that his role of 
being a student senator is to 
address the needs and concerns 
of the student body. 

Smith is on the Dining and 
Residence Hall Conmiittee, a job 



he takes very seriously. As a 
member of the committee, Smith 
works closely with the dining 
and residence halls to see that 
students' needs and suggestions 
are met. 

Smith wants all students to get 
involved in Student Senate. "We 
as student senators are here to 
work for and with the entire stu- 
dent body. Without you this uni- 
versity wouldn't exist. So please 
voice your opinions and make a 
difference." 

When asked what needs to be 
changed at Clarion University, 
student senator Angela Link 
says, "More student involvement 
is needed here at Clarion. The 
school could be so much more 
full of life if there was more 
involvement from all of the stu- 
dents." 

Link, a sophomore elemen- 
tary/special education major is 
concerned with apathy among 
the student body. "There is so 
much to get involved in here at 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Angela Link is just one of 
the many dedicated Student 
Senators ready to be your 
voice on campus issues. 

Clarion, but students don't seem 
to care." Link is also a part of 
the Committee on Sub- 
Conmiittees and Student Centers 




'•(lUP students) need to 

give blood so that 

Clarion's football team 

will have an extra 

supply." 

-Jim Leda 

President 

> lUP Student Congress 



I 



][]ujW 



American Red Cross Bloodmobile 

Challenge 

CLARION vs lUP 

Monday, October 1 8th 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 

11 AM -5 PM 

The winner of the Clarion-IUP Blood Drive 

will have its flag flown over the losing 

school's campus for a day. 

For more information see page 3. 



Committee. 

A major reason Link ran for 
Student Senate was so her opin- 
ions could be voiced and heard. 
Her goal as a student senator is 
to give everyone a chance to 
have their opinions heard. 

Katrina Helmick is a senior 
French/ international business/ 
economics major who ran for 
student senate so she could be 
the spokesperson of "the cam- 
pus' most precious resources — 
its students," Her most impor- 
tant goal as a student senator is 
to increase the student body's 
awareness in subjects concerning 
everyone. 



Helmick is the chair of the 
Committee on Subcommittees 
and is also a member of the 
Elections Committee. She also 
believes that student involve- 
ment is the key in making the 
student senate effective. She 
says, "Student Senate is here to 
represent you. If you don't 
express how you feel, we'll 
never know. Let your voice be 
heard." 

Our student senators are wait- 
ing to hear your voice. If you 
have any suggestions or com- 
plaints, stop by the Student 
Senate office in 269 Gemmell. 



Medley of Latvian art displayed 



by Crystal Janis 
Lifestyles Writer 



An interesting array of art from 
Latvia is being displayed in the 
Sandford Art Gallery in 
Marwick-Boyd during October. 
The exhibit opened Tuesday, 
October 5 and will continue 
through Thursday, October 28. 

A plethora of six artists con- 
tribute a medley of artwork to be 
seen. Ilmars Blumbergs and 
Peteris Martinsons present their 
ideas in prints and ceramics. 
Egils Rozenberg creates printed 
fiber work of wall splattered 
tapestries. Viesturs Berzins gen- 
erates works of fiber, ceramics 
and sculpture. 

Juris Leitans contributes a dis- 
play of Russian amber jewelry. 
Necklaces, pins, rings and 
bracelets with hints of sterling 
silver adorn one particular comer 
of the gallery. Peteris Sidars 
completes this exhibit with more 
ceramics. All of the work dis- 
plays a wide variety of color, 
ranging from as neutral as 
blacks, whites and browns to as 
bold as bright pinks and sky 
Uues. 

"All work is contemporary and 
most is abstract or surreal," com- 
ments Joyce Jabl(Miski, director 
of the Sandford Gallery. "In 
their older works under Soviet 



rule, they had no control over 
what they could make. They had 
to be careful and focused their 
works on nationalism through 
recognizable, figurative work, 
supporting the country." 

These artists' works have 
changed greatly since Latvia 
pushed for independence in 
1988-89. Their main influence 
after this privilege of freedom 
came from what they saw on 
U.S. television broadcasts out of 
Finland and after a visit to the 
U.S. 

Due to the loss of government 
support, the artists had to 
become much more independent, 
supporting themselves through 
gallery exhibits and sales of their 
work. 

Jablonski has met each of these 
artists, "I met all of these artists 
at fiber and sculpture sympo- 
siums I attended in 1989 and 
1990. I invited all of them to the 
United States, and they have all 
visited and worked in the 
Chicago area. The pieces that 
they left behind are the basis for 
this exhibit." 

Gallery hours are 1-5 p.m. on 
Monday and Friday, 9 a.m.-8 
pjn. on Tuesday and Thursday, 
and 2-5 p.m. on Wednesday. 
Following the Latvian art is a 
faculty art exhibit November 2- 
24. 



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by Chuck Shepherd 



-Officials of the Katy (Texas) 
Independent School District sent 
parents formal letters of apology 
in September for having distrib- 
uted a sexual conduct manual, 
which officials belatedly con- 
cluded went too far. Among the 
listed violations, requiring expul- 
sion, explained to all students 
from the first grade up were hav- 
ing sexual contact with the geni- 
tals or anuses of animals. 

-In August, Judge Robert 
Schillberg released shoplifter 
Leroy Kelley without penalty in 
Lynnwood, Washington even 
though Kelley had just pleaded 
guilty to stealing two packs of 
Marlboros from a Safeway store, 
Schillberg fined Kelley $1, 
which the judge then paid out of 
his own pocket, because he 
believes "the store is more culpa- 
ble than (Kelley) is" for selling 
cigarettes in the first place since 
they are such dangerous prod- 
ucts. 

-In August, Food and Drug 
Administration agents raided a 
store in Columbus, Ohio that had 
an inventory of "ear candles," 
which are hollow candles that in 
theory will loosen hard-to- 
remove wax from a person's 
ears. (The candle is placed in 
the ear and lighted on top; the 
oxygen sucked from the hollow 
canal creates a vacuum that 
loosens the earwax.) FDA said 
neither the safety nor the effec- 



tiveness of the candles had been 
demonstrated. 

-In Rome, Georgia last fall, 
Rusty Strickland, 23, was sen- 
tenced to 12 years in prison 
when a substance the police said 
was cocaine was found in plastic 
bags in his home. At the time, 
Strickland begged for the police 
chemist to analyze the contents; 
the chemist affirmed that the 
substance was cocaine. After 
Strickland had served six months 
of his sentence, police chemists 
ran another test and found that 
the bags all along contained only 
soap. The original chemist, who 
had sworn in court that he had 
tested the bag but had not, was 
fired. 

-In July, Sacramento, 
California police began a crack- 
down on the city's homeless who 
were illegally camping out. 
Numerous citations were written, 
but almost as fast as the citations 
came to court, the court clerk- 
following official procedures — 
voided them because they lacked 
home addresses for the accused. 

-Retired Mongolian physician 
Ichinnorof Dendev, 60, and two 
countrymen are in the middle of 
a nine-month "walk" from 
Mongolia to Seattle, Washington 
where they hope to place flowers 
on the grave of the late martial 
arts movie star Bruce Lee, who 
apparently is very popular in 
Mongolia. As of early 
September, the trio were trying 



River City Brass Band 

Featuring the jazzy rhythms ofthejlapper era in 

RAGS. BLUES AND FOXTROTS 



From the Prohibition days, songs including: 

Irving BerUn's "Puttln' on the Rltz" 

George Gershwin's ^'American in Paris" 

John PhiUp Sousa's **The National Game" 

and more! 

Performance sites: 

Carson JMOddle School North HlUs-October S 

Carnegie Mii«le Killt Onklind-October 9 

Mt« Lebanon High $eilO<yi« South Hills-Octobet 12 

Gateway High Schooiv lipnxoeyllle'-October 14 

Palace Theatte^ iSmeitudmrg-October 16 

For ticket information, call (412) 322«RCBB 
or toll £ree 1-800-292-RCBB 



to get from Nome, Alaska, to 
Fairbanks, despite landscape that 
is impossible for walking. 

-James Cramer, 25, and Rudolf 
Warren, 24, were arrested in 
August and charged with four 
robberies of Buffalo, New York 
banks. The pair came to the 
attention of police when officers 
made a routine traffic stop of 
Warren, who was alone and dri- 
ving Cramer's car, and asked for 
his registration papers. Warren 
reached into the glove compart- 
ment and handed all the papers 
to the police, inadvertently 
including the holdup note the 
two had been using ("I have a 
gun. Put all the money in the 
envelope quickly!") 

-Wilfredo Nunez, 43, died of 
head injuries after being swept 
off his feet by unusually strong 
currents in a New York City 
sewer in July while sifting 
through knee-deep water search- 
ing for coins and trinkets. Said a 
colleague, of the pair's expedi- 
tion, "It doesn't smell that bad 
down there, and you don't get 
that dirty." 

-In May, the Howard Johnson 
Plaza-Suite Hotel in Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana temporary 
home of state Rep. David 
Armstrong of New Orleans 
while the legislature is in ses- 
sion, banned him from the 
premises, to protect its female 
employees from Armstrong's 
repeated sexual harassments. 
Hotel manager Rick Smith said 
he had stopped allowing house- 
keeping employees to go to 
Armstrong's room alone because 
several of them said Armstrong 
had greeted them naked or wear- 



ing little clothing, had made var- 
ious sexual gestures and had 
invariably invited them to join 
him in sexual activities. 

-Knight-Ridder News Service 
reported in December that Roger 
Dunavant's Straight Arrow firm 
in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania has 
increased sales of its horse 
grooming products over the last 
three years from $500,000 a year 
to $12 million through sales to 
humans for grooming them- 
selves. The hottest product is 
Mane 'n Tail Conditioner, but 
Hoofmaker also sells well as a 
hands and nails conditioner. 

-Rick Brown of Los Angeles 
introduced a $69.95 audiocas- 
sette program for women, 
'Think and Grow Breasts," con- 
sisting of hypnotic creative-visu- 
alization exercises designed to 
take women's minds back to 
puberty, to re-engage the "mam- 
mary-building process." 

-In a recent issue of the trade 
journal Circus Report was a 
notice placed by a clown, threat- 
ening legal action if a competitor 
didn't stop using the first 
clown's performing name, which 
is "Underwearhead the Clown." 

-Donald Kuntz, 25, was con- 
victed of assault in Toronto in 
March after participating in the 
slicing open of the arm of a 21- 
year-old woman he had just met 
in a bar. According to testimony 
at the trial, the woman had 
agreed in principle to let him 
drink her blood, but it was Kuntz 
who opened the wound, causing 
the woman pain and forcing her 
to head for the hospital. 
According to witnesses, Kuntz 
then dropped to the floor and 
licked up the spilled blood 
before fleeing. 

-Brian C. Jones, 20, was arrest- 
ed in Norfolk, Virginia in May 
and charged with breaking into 
his neighbor's house, stealing a 
television, camera and VCR, and 
then setting the neighbor's house 



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on fire, gutting it to wipe out any 
evidence linking him to the theft. 
However, the neighbor's house 
is actually on the other part of 
Jones' duplex. Jones' place suf- 
fered heavy smoke damage, 
which opened the house to fire- 
fighters, and the neighbor's 
equipment was spotted inside. 

-Among the inventions 
revealed in a February contest in 
Tokyo sponsored by Konica 
Corp. was a camera tripod fitted 
with an adjustable-length U- 
shaped chin rest and a shoe with 
a telescoping handle for killing 
hard-to-reach insects. 

-(c)1993 Universal Press 
Syndicate 



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Iht W4Y Vill j'^w If tk (Mj 
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226-4060 

In the 800 Center 



Page 18 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Pittsburgh's Dancing Linda appearing at Metropol 



by Kristen Geyer 
Lifestyles Writer 



"Sometimes true individuality 
comes not from creating some- 
thing new, but from avoiding 
everything familiar," says 
Pittsburgh City Paper writer 
John Hayes in relation to 
Pittsburgh's own alternative rock 
band Dancing Linda. 

Dancing Linda's original mate- 
rial, with thoughtful lyrics and a 
touch of metal, can be heard on 
Clarion's WCCB 640 A.M. and, 
following the trend, Edinboro 
University's station WFSE. Not 
only is Clarion being trendy by 
playing Dancing Linda on their 
radio stations, but the fraternity 
Sigma Phi Epsilon brought them 
to Clarion live. Dancing Linda 
can also be heard on WDVE's 
"Homegrown" show. 

Pennsylvania Musician writer 
Ronnie Cremer describes 
Dancing Linda's sound as "uuly 
unique. . .the chord changes and 
rhythmic variations displayed on 
their demo tape are extremely 
tasty, and I love food for song." 
Cremer also calls Dancing 
Linda's music as "cutting edge 
stuff." 

The four-man band, with 
Jimmy on vocals and lead guitar, 
Mark on drums, Chris on rhythm 
and lead guitar and Jason on 
bass, could have a very promis- 
ing future, according to Aaron P. 



"Throwing up a sound that falls 
somewhere between the guitar 
krunch of Alice in Chains and 
the ambionic noise washes 
of Smashing Pumpkins, 
Pittsburgh's own Dancing Linda 
may be one of the city's best 
kept secrets." 

Arthurs continues to rave 
about Dancing Linda as "pack- 
ing enough commercial appeal 
to probably draw some label 
attention, yet staying far enough 
left of center to be respectible." 

Some of Dancing Linda's 
songs include "Arig Nos Rae", 
"Poor Little World", "Under 
Water", "Honey Dear", "and 
"Circus." Says Bryan 

Woleslagle of Pennsylvania 
Musician, "All instruments stand 
out and what Jimmy does with 
his vocals is a very talented dif- 
ference to show off his unique 
ways." 

In the past. Dancing Linda has 
performed at Metropol in 
Pittsburgh and at Niabingy and 
Mutt's, both in West Virginia. 
Now Metropol is bringing 
Dancing Linda back home. 

So if you feel like taking a 
road trip to Pittsburgh tonight, be 
sure to stop in at the Metropol to 
check out Dancing Linda along 
with Bunjie Jambo and 
Thickhead Grin. The doors open 
at 6:30 and the performance is 
open to all ages with admission 
of $3. 




Pittsburgh's alternative rock group Dancing Linda, who 
the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity house, will be performing 



University Relations photo 
recently appeared to perform at 
at the Metropol tonight. 




7%^<KU»1&J^^ 



■n 
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I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
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I 
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Hard Shell 
Tacos 

750 each 

Not valid w/ any other offer j 
Expires 10-14-93 



f9| MEXICAN VILLAGE 



^/^^.UUll X VV\.% . \ . V\!i 





I 
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Take out. Eat in, or 

Free delivery 
226-7166 



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Soft Shell 
Tacos 

800 each 

Not valid w/ any other offer. 
Expires 10-14-93 



Across from 
Clarion Mall 



Open Friday and Saturday until 12:00 

WE DEUVER FREE WITHIN 5 MILES OF CLARION • All prices subject to 
change without notice • 'Daily Specials* 




Editor's correction: 

In the September 23 issue 
of the Call, the headline 
for the "See you at the 
pole" article should have 
read Koinonia and 
Intervarsity united students 
'at the pole'. 



Comic Books 



# 



101 

Comics,cards 

Collector supplies 

Monday-Friday 

Noon-5:00 

Friday 
Noon-7:00 

(Open earlier by chance) 

Phone 227-2544 

Located on South 6th Ave. 
Across from the Loomis 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 19 



A pack of gum and a piece of history at Herman's 



by John Martinec 
Lifestyles Writer 



The next time you need a pack 
of gum, cigarettes, a can of pop 
or some canned goods, think 
about going to Herman's 
Groceries-Conf. because you 
may get a little more than you 
think. 

This modest store is located 
beside Wendy's just off campus. 
It is a special little place because 
mixed in among the Pop-Tarts 
and the cans of beans is some of 
American small-town history. 

The original store was started 
in the 1860s as a general store 
like many others. It was a 
friendly store where the regular 
custcnners could go in to buy the 
day's groceries, set up an 
Hccount or go buv a chaw of 



tobacco for that day. They 
grinded their own coffee at 
Herman's and sold fresh baked 
goods to wide-eyed children. 

The store used to supply the 
university with buns and cold 
cuts, but that slowly changed 
when the town began to grow 
and the other larger businesses 
started to take the orders away 
from the small general stores. 

Today Herman's is a landmark 
of sorts here in Clarion. It is one 
of the last small-town general 
stores left in operation. At one 
time the store would have many 
people coming in and out but 
today only twenty or thirty peo- 
ple, usually college students, 
walk through those wooden 
doors. 

There was a time when many 



students would enter the store to 
buy a snack or something for 
dinner. But today, according to 
the store owner, Joseph Hennan, 
the students want "pizza, beer 
and ready-made sandwiches." 
Unfortunately this store does not 
carry those items. 

However, Herman's does have 
what most stores do not. All 
around the store are bottles and 
cans, little figurines and signs. 
Beneath the soft layer of dust 
that covers them is a story. The 
stories tell of Clarion history not 
unlike the history of many of 
America's small towns. 

Did you know that Clarion had 
at one time its own beer compa- 
ny around the 1900s? Not only 
that, but it had its own Coca- 
Cola bottling plant which closed 



in the 1940s. Hennan has a bot- 
tle from each company 

What was most interesting was 
how people started to call soda 
water, pop. According to 
Herman, Stines Kennedy sold a 
beverage in the 1930s that had a 
metal loop connected to a rubber 
plug in a bottle. The plug kept 
the flavoring and the carbonation 
separated. When the bottle was 
opened and the flavoring and 
carbonation were mixed together 
it caused a loud "POP" and bub- 
bles flowed everywhere. Thus 
came the name "pop." 

Many other pieces of history 
are preserved in glass at 
Herman's. There are tall wine 
bottles and bottles that are 
shaped like men and animals. 
Herman also has beer bottles of 



all shapes and sizes. 

Herman handed me one bottle 
with nicks around the mouth. 
He told me it was caused from 
the bottle being worn from the 
metal rod they used to remove 
the cork. 

There was a glass rolling pin 
and advertisement signs that 
looked like they should be in a 
museum. Herman also had a 
glass blowing rod that was used 
to make bottles here in Clarion. 

Just reading about these stories 
can never equal hearing them 
straight from the mouth of a man 
who knows them by heart. They 
lose the flavor that only Herman 
can give as he remembers work- 
ing for his grandfather, who ran 
the same store prior to him. 




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Page 20 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Entertainment 



THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 





'I'm starting to feel dependent. 



Fortunately for Sparky, Zeke knew the famous 
"Rex maneuver." 




Doonesbury 



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The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 21 



Entertainment 



Creature Feature 



Bv D.H. Aarons 



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MARLBORO, UUIN'5JW, SALBM ~ 
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What do you want? 




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by Bill Watterson 



I LOVE m 5CW0OL 
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GUIDE 



The battle of the 

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rages on. 




Who Gares? 

Just Watch TV- 5. 



Page 22 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



I 



root r-fi^ffoi'^o /ph?^ifrfT •IM"^ noHun 'jffT 
The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



1£ 32BT 

Page23 













Page 24 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 25 







s; ' ^ ^c ' p 




VV::^:^ 



Should mid-semester 
break coincide with ALF 
instead of being the week 

after? 



CALL-ON'YOU 
compiled by 
Christin Mihon 




Brian McQuillan 

Senior 

"No, because students usually want to go home 

to see friends and family." 




■x-l ■>^ 4^fe>»;:S;4S. 






Tammi Kearns 

Freshman 

"I think that we should have both off. 

That would solve both problems." 



Bob Saunders 

Sophomore 

"I think we should have Thursday and 

Friday off during ALF." 



Charity Carney 

Freshman 

'I think that Thursday and Friday during 

ALF should both be days off." 







Emmanuel Onwudiwe 

Junior 

"No, because ALF is forthe community, 

not for the university." 





II 



Michael Keaton 
Freshman 
I don't really think it makes any 
difference." 



Kim Donahue 

Freshman 

Sure, I think it would be a good idea." 



Sports 



Ea gles fall to 1-3 



Edinboro crushes Eagles, 28-0 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 



It was an ugly, dreary day in 
Clarion anyway, but four Golden 
Eagle fumbles, three 
interceptions, and 102 yards 
worth of penalties turned 
uglyness into putrescence as the 
Golden Eagles were skunked by 
Edinboro 28-0. 

The severity of starting 
quarterback Chris Zak's leg 
injury was kept quiet all week, 
and at game's start, Craig Ray 
was under center. 

Trailing 7-0 late in quarter 
number one, Ray led the offense 
to the Edinboro 30, but on the 
13th play of drive, he fumbled 
the snap. Clarion never got 
closer than that. 

After two Edinboro field goals 
went awry, quarterback Jody 
Dickerson found Scott Mikowicz 
from three yards away for a 14-0 
halftime lead. 

Clarion was lucky to only be 
down by two touchdowns, as the 
Scots accumulated 296 total 
yards and 12 first downs in just 
two quarters. 

Edinboro continued its 
domination in the second half. 
The Scots used a 25 yard reverse 
and 20 yards worth of Clarion 
penalties to set up another score 
midway through the third. A 
five yard run by Larry Jackson 
capped off the drive and made it 
21-0. 

Later m the third, a 50 yard 
Dickerson missile set up a one 
yard plunge by Tom Tedder that 
mercifully closed out the scoring 
for the Scots. 

On the day, Edinboro amassed 
441 yards of total offense to 
Clarion's 221, while the Eagles 
were flagged for five personal 
"fowls." 

With the loss, the Eagles' 
record drops to 1-3, 0-1 in the 
conference as they enter 
Saturday's Homecoming game 
against Bloomsburg. Clarion 
beat Bloomsburg 23-20 last year. 
Saturday's kickoff is at 2 p.m. 




Ray Henderson/ Clarion Call 
Contemplating the odds: Saturday's 28-0 loss to Edinboro forced Chris Coleman (98) and 
the Golden Eagles to reflect upon what went wrong. 



Edinboro 
Clarion 



7 7 




14 0-28 
0-0 



First Quarter 
£dinboro: Henne 32 pass from 
Dickerson (Rupert kick). Drive: 

5 plays, 55 yards, 1:34. Key 
play; Mikowic? 10 pass &x)m 
Dickerson on 3rd& 5 from 
midfield. Edinboro 7, CUP 0. 

Second Quarter 
EdinI)oro: Mikowicz 3 pass 
from Dickerson (Rupert kick). 
Drive: 9 plays, 62 yards, 3:4 K 
Key play: Jackson 10 pass torn 
Dickerson on 4th & 4 from 
Clarion 18. P:dinboro 14, 
Clarion 0. 

Third Quarter 
Edinboro: Jackson 5 run 
<Rupcrt kick). Drive: 8 plays, 56 
yaals, 3:05. Key play: Waher 
runs reverse for 25 yards on 2nd 

6 16 from Clarion 31. 
Edinboro 21, Clarion 0. 
Edinboro: Tedder I run (Rupert 
kick). Drive 3 plays, 52 yards, 
:57. Key play: Grifl'in 50 p.iss 
from Dickerson on first play of 
drive. Edinboro 28, Clarion 0. 



T^pm S»t3t)Rftics 






Boro 


CUP 


First Dov/ns 


20 


13 


Rushing Yards 


172 


64 


Passing Yards 


269 


157 


Totiil Offense 


441 


221 


Comp/Att 


16/27 


11/32 


Pa.sses Had Int 





3 


Fumbles,' Lost 


2-1 


4-2 


Penalties/ Yards 


7/90 


9/102 


3rd Down Conv. 


5-12 


4-14 


4th Down Conv. 


1-2 


1-2 



Player Statistics 
jRu^hing- Edinboro: JacksCH) 
11-70; R(^rts9-56; Hill 12-29. 
Oarion: Gregory 10-29; Henry 
12-26; Kamara 1-25. 
Passing- Edinboro: Dickerson 
16-27 for 269 yds and 2 TD's 
Clarion: Ray 11-32 for 157 and 
3INT'$. 

Receiving- Kdinboro: Griffin 4- 
74; Mikowicz 3-47; Ashton 3- 
79. Clarion: Brown 7-83; 
Harper 2-41; Worthy 1-17. 



f*r 



n 



Page 26 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Clarion defeats lUP. 3-0 



Mountain 



by Ray Henderson 
Sportswriter 



During the first week of 
September, with three games 
under their belt, the Clarion 
University volleyball team was 
riding high. They had just 
defeated lUP at the Fairmont 
State volleyball tournament to 
bring their record to 2-1. 

In the weeks that followed, the 
Lady Eagles' returned to Tippin 
Gymnasium for only two games 
against Robert Morris and Lock 
Haven, and their record 
plummeted to a dismal 2-15 that 
put them nearly in the basement 
of the PSAC. After a 14 game 
losing streak, it took a trip to the 
Rockies to bring their rocky 
record to 3-16, when they bested 
Tabor University of Kansas at 



the Colorado Christian 
Tournament in Colorado 
Springs. 

On Tuesday evening, the team 
managed to put yet another 
number in the "W" column with 
a 3-0 (15-8. 15-8, 15-1) victory 
against lUP. So far this season, 
two of the Eagles' three wins 
have been chalked up against 
lUP. Sophomore Bobbie 
Simpson led the evening with 
eleven kills, and Nicole 
Flambard finished close behind 
with ten. Katy Rhoads had 33 
assists for the evening, and Lisa 
Flynn dug in for 15 digs. 

The Eagles, their record 
improved to 4-16, will face off 
against Point Park College on 
October 15 at Tippin 
Gymnasium at 7 p.m. 



Mens open singles 

Pat Mowry dec. Rick Fenstermaker 6-4, 7-6 (7-3) 

Mens doubles 

Pat Mowry and Joe Drayer dec. Rick Slike and 
Rick Fenstermaker 6-4 4-6 7-6 (7-5) 

Mens sing les 

James Murphy dec. Mike White 6-1, 6-2 




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Ray Henderson/ Clarion Call 
Flying high: The Golden Eagle volleyball team returned from the rarifled air of Colorado to 
soar miles above lUP on Tuesday. 

Clarion drops EUP, lUP 



by Nathan Kahl 
Sportswriter 



After one of the worst starts in 
recent memory, the Clarion 
Golden Eagles tennis team 
pulled together for a two game 
win streak to raise its record to 
3-6. 

A determined Eagle squad 
embarked on a two game road 
trip and Edinboro was the first 
destination. 

Kristen McKinley disposed of 
her opponent only minutes after 



it started with a 6-0, 6-1 beating. 
She then teamed with Morgan 
Mulvihill to claim a 6-4, 3-6, 6-2 
win. It was the first doubles 
victory for that team. 

Mulvihill also grabbed her first 
singles match of the year with a 
6-4, 3-6, 6-2 decision. 

Roxann Milton evened her 
record at 3-3 with a come from 
behind victory 4-6, 6-3, 6-2; and 
Shara Wolkimir won 6-2, 6-0. 

Wolkimir continued her great 
play at lUP. After a shaky start 
she overwhelmed her opponent 



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3-6, 6-2, 6-0 to raise her personal 
record to 6-3. Wolkimir also 
won her doubles match, teaming 
with Melodi Dess for a 6-1, 6-2 
conquest. 

£>ess won her singles match 3- 
6, 6-2, 6-0 to increase her win 
total to four, and the number two 
seeded Milton took her singles 
match as well 6-4, 6-2. 

The teams of Milton and 
Unkefer along with McKinley 
and Mulvihill captured victories 
in doubles to give the Eagles six 
of the nine possible points. 

The Eagles will have to miss 
the ALF parade for their next 
match, a home tilt with 
Bloomsburg on Saturday. That 
match begins at 1 1 : 30. 

The Eagles seemed to have 
peaked at just the right time, for 
the PSAC Championships are 
right around the comer starting 
October 14 and lasting until 
October 16. 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 27 



Brown needs seven catches 



Clarion hoping to regroup against Bloomsburg 



Story courtesy of 
Sporte Information 



Clarion University's 1993 
football team will look to get 
back on the winning track this 
Saturday, October 9, as the 
Golden Eagles host Bloomsburg 
in the annual Homecoming 
game. Kickoff at Clarion's 
Memorial Stadium will be at 2 
p.m. 

The Golden Eagles enter the 
game with a 1-3 overall record 
and 0-1 mark in the PSAC-West, 
and Bloomsburg comes in at 1-4, 
0-1 in the PSAC-East 

"A year ago we were 0-4 going 
into this game and we told the 
team we still believed in them, 
we just needed to keep working 
hard and take them one game at 
a time," reflected head coach 
Gene Sobolewski. "We're going 
to approach this game just like 
we did a year ago and keep a 
positive approach. There's a lot 
of football left in 1993." 

The Golden Eagles, who are 



averaging 329.8 yards of offense 
per game will again be without 
the services of starting 
quarterback Chris Zak. The 
junior signal-caller, who injured 
his knee during the New Haven 
game in 1992 missed the entire 
season, re-injured his knee at 
Westminster two weeks ago and 
sat out the Edinboro game on 
Saturday. He will be re- 
evaluated next week. 

The Eagles will start junior 
Craig Ray who has completed 20 
of 46 passes for 210 yards and 1 
td, along with 4 interceptions. 

AU-American tight end Tim 
Brown, who ranks number one 
in the PSAC with 6.8 catches per 
game in 1993, is bearing down 
on the Clarion career reception 
record. Brown currently has 143 
career receptions at Clarion, 
second in school history behind 
former great Ron Urbansky who 
had 149 catches from 1986-89. 

Clarion's second leading 
receiver Jess Quinn will miss the 
Bloomsburg game with a leg 



mjury. 

Clarion's running game will 
be led by tailback Damien 
Henry. Henry has 396 yards on 
90 attempts, plus has caught 9 
passes for 104 yards and 1 td. 

The Clarion defense is yielding 
361 yards of offense per game, 
including 191.8 on the ground 
and 169.3 passing. 

The Huskies are averaging 
258.6 yards of total offense per 
game, and are led by 
sophomore quarterback Phil 
Ries, who has completed 46 of 
105 passes for 640 yards and 
seven td's, but has tossed nine 
interceptions. 

Ready to catch the pigskin are 
wideouts Buck Eardley (21 
catches) and Jeff Zoranski (10 
grabs) 

The running game is solid 
behind fullback Syheed Brooks 
(261 yards) and tailback Mike 
Johnson (243 yards). 

The Bloomsburg 
defense is giving up 402 yards of 
offense per game. 



Sports Commentary: 



Can Philly fly with Bubby? 



by Jody Males 
Sportswriter 



After watching Sunday's Jets- 
Eagles clash, I've become a 
believer; the Boomer Esiason led 
Jets are for real. The fired-up 
team from the Meadowlands was 
out to prove its worth against an 
NFC powerhouse in the 
Philadelphia Eagles. The result, 
a crazy 35-30 Philadelphia 
victory. No, not crazy, 
unimaginable. 

Eagles' quarterback Randall 
Cunningham ended his season 
early once again by suffering a 
broken leg in the first half. 
Guess who stepped in? You 
guessed it, the man for whom, 
due to his erratic passing, every 
underpass and overpass in 
Pittsburgh is named. Bubby 
Brister. Yes, black and gold die 
hards, your former starting 
quarterback. This particular 
Sunday, however, Brister would 
bury the Steeler ghosts from the 
past. 

Brister rallied tiis troops to 21 



points in the second half and 
tamed the Jets' Boomer Esiason 
in the fourth quarter. 
Philadelphia defensive back Eric 
Allen sealed the track meet for 
Philly with a 94 yard 
interception return. 

To tell you the truth, I never 
doubted Brister's ability. Crowd 
pressure, a mediocre offensive 
line and shaky receivers were 
partly the reason for Bubby's 
escapades in Pittsburgh, but in 
Philadelphia, he's been greeted 
with open arms and a clean slate. 

With many key players gone to 
free agency such as Reggie 
White, Keith Jackson and Keith 
Byars, the Eagles weren't 
expected to make the playoffs in 
1993, but at 4-0, they lead the 
most powerful division in the 
NFL. 

With the Phillies in the 



playoffs, the city of Philadelphia 
has turned its attention more 
towards baseball for this 
October, but the undefeated 
Eagles deserve the just attention 
of their fans. Remember 1980? 
Tug McGraw led the Phils to a 
World Series championship over 
the Royals, and Ron Jaworski 
passed his Eagles to an NFC 
championship and an appearance 
in Super Bowl XV. Deja vu? 

- In other NFL notes, the New 
Orleans Saints kept rolling with 
a 37-6 drubbing of the LA Rams. 
Playing probably the best 
defense in the NFL, the Saints 
kept the Rams from getting 
inside their 20 yard line. 

- Kansas City's Joe Montana 
went down with a hamstring 
injury, but the Chiefs were still 
able to hold the Raiders in check, 
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Page 28 



r-oii 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Sports Commentary : 



My interview with Jack Lambert 



by Nathan Kahl 
Sportswriter 



Would you pay eight bucks to 
get the autograph of a linebacker 
that hasn't played in the NFL 
since 1984, and is currently the 
deputy game warden of 
Armstrong county? Probably 
not, but I would. In fact I did on 
Sunday when Jack Lambert 
came to the Clarion Mall (and 1 
ase the word "mall" loosely) to 
sign autographs. 

The eight dollars was a small 
jHice to pay (I hear Willie Mays 
charges $30) as far as I was 
concerned. You s6e, Jack 
Lambert has been my idol ever 
since I was about eight years old. 
I am a long time cult follower of 
the Steeler teams of the 
seventies, and Lambert 
epitomized those teams. I have 
alwavs wanted to iust be able to 
sit down and shoot the breeze 
with one of the many hall of 
famers that played for those 
teams. I had done so much 
research about them that I 
probably knew more about their 
careers than they did. When I 
found out that my favorite of 
those hall of famers was going to 
be in Clarion, I hoped that I 
could get an interview with him 
for the Call. A conversation 
with him would be like a dream 
come true. 

After arriving at the mall and 
standing in line for several 
minutes, my chance finally came 



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to talk to the greatest middle 
linebacker ever to play. When 1 
got to him I excitedly shook his 
hand and said the wonderfully 
original line, "I'm a big fan." 
Ouch. I was choking in front of 
my hero. 

I shook that one off and moved 
on the rehearsed words. You 
see, in Super Bowl X, Steeler 
kicker Roy Gerela missed a 33 
yard field goal. Dallas Cowboy 
comerback Cliff Harris patted 
Gerela patronizingly on the 
head; an unacceptable taunt. 



asked if he was happy about 
being drafted by the Steelers 
back in 1974. He said that he 
had not been because the 
Steelers already had Jack Ham 
and Andy Russell at linebacker, 
and he did not think he would 
get to play. After this, he signed 
another autograph (this man, 
whose hands were shaking 
profusely, plunked down $24 for 
a card, football, and hat to be 
signed). Then I asked my 
second question. "What was it 
like playing with Chuck Noll?" 



"I had to hold out for $200,000, 
and I had made it to three 
consecutive pro bowls. " 

—Jack Lambert 



Lambert ran up behind him and 
threw him on the ground. This 
was a moment that is shown on 
every Super Bowl highlight tape 
and really epitomized the Steeler 
domination and intimidation of 
the 70's. I told Lambert that I 
loved that play, to which he 
responded, "Were you even alive 
then?" I said that I was two and 
he said, "Well, I'm sure that you 
have vivid memories." 
Everyone in line laughed, but 
Lambert wasn't even smiling. 

My ego was bruised a little 
but this was the crucial part. I 
asked him for an interview after 
the autograph signings. "Well, 
we'll see how the time goes." 
Right. A sugar coated "no." 

After an hour, the line had 
dried up and I walked over to the 
table at which he was sitting. I 
stood beside him with my 
notebook for about 15 seconds as 
he stared straight ahead, feigning 
obliviousness to my presence. 
Finally, I asked him if he could 
answer a few questions. A 
wordless nod was all I got. I 



"I never played with Chuck 
Noll, he was my coach." This 
was followed with a humorless 
chuckle. 

Sorry your highness, I didn't 
realize what close attention to 
detail you ex-jocks pay to 
linguistics. Then, with a critical 
look he asked, "Are you even 
writing any of this stuff down? 
What paper do you write for 
anyway? "You must have a 
really good memory." 

Slowly, my enthusiasm was 
beginning to change to both 
embarassment and anger. I 
couldn't exactly produce press 
credentials, but I think that I 
convinced him that this was a 
real interview. Even though I 
could realize I was more of a 
nuisance to him than a journalist, 
I pressed on. 

Still dripping with attitude, he 
seemed to begin to talk a bit 
more openly about his playing 
days. He noted that during his 
first two years in the NFL his 
team won the Super Bowl. "It 
was just the way we ended our 



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season. I really took that for 
granted. It wasn't until the first 
year we didn't make it to the 
Super Bowl..." his mind 
searched to grasp the year and I 
quickly contributed, "1977." He 
gave a look that I think was of 
annoyment and then continued, 
"It wasn't until that year that I 
realized how hard it was to win 
the championship." 

I asked him to respond to a 
quote. "Paul Zimmerman said 
that if 'Terry Bradshaw was their 
sword, and Joe Greene their 
heart, and Franco Harris their 
power, then Jack Lambert was 
their spirit.' How would you 
respond to that?" 

"Who's Paul Zimmerman?" 

'The premier NFL journalist in 
the country." I assumed he 
would know. 

"Well then he would know 
huh? (Humorless laugh again) I 
don't care about a blade or a 
sword or a heart, I just played 
the best that I could every game 
and if that inspired people, so be 
it. I never understood why 
people that are professionals 
need to be inspired." 

In Lambert's rookie year he 
signed for a measely $30,000. 
He breeds contempt for the 
owners, it seems, and I would 
guess that he is happy with the 
fact that they are shelling out so 
much money for today's players. 
"I had to hold out for $200,000, 
and I had made it to three 
consecutive Pro-Bowls. The 
owners got rich off us for years 
but would never part with a 
nickel more than what they had 
to." 

When asked if the Steeler 
teams that he played on were the 
greatest ever, Lambert said, "We 
were certainly one of the greatest 
teams that ever played. It's all 
relative. It's too hard to 
compare. It's like trying to say 
who was the greatest running 



back of all time." 

Upon completing the interview 
(which I cut short because of his 
excessive rudeness), I thanked 
him and wished him luck with 
his 1 1/2 week old baby. As I 
walked away, I was saddened 
because my favorite football 
player of all time, was no longer 
that. I couldn't believe the 
incredible indifference with 
which he treated me. How could 
he treat his number one fan like 
that? Didn't he know I've 
glamorized him for years? 
And then I thought, no he 
doesn't. 

Sometimes people expect too 
much of professional athletes. 
We may worship them so 
intensely and for so long that we 
feel we have an intimate 
relationship with them. Yet 
when we look at it from their 
perspective, we're just another 
fan, and they see the face of the 
fan hundreds of times a day for 
years. If I would have blurted 
out the endless number of facts 
an figures that I knew about his 
career, rather than be impressed, 
I'm sure he would say, "Get a 
life kid." He would see me as 
the football equivalent of a 
Trekkie. 

I loved the way Jack Lambert 
played football, but that never 
meant that he was obliged to be 
Mr. Personality. Charles Barkley 
says that he's not a role model, 
and I guess Lambert doesn't feel 
that he needs to be one either. 

The whole experience raised 
the question in my mind: Are 
professional athletes 

automatically forced to behave 
themselves in the public eye? 
We have to realize that there are 
some athletes that we have to 
admire for their athletic ability 
and their athletic ability only. 
Otherwise, our images of them 
may be spoiled. 




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The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page 29 



Sports Commentary: 

With Jordan's father, so died the thrill 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 



He won three straight NBA 
championships, three MVP 
awards, seven scoring titles, two 
gold medals, and an NCAA 
national championship. Nobody 
could stop him. So, Wednesday 
afternoon, Michael Jordan 
stopped himself. 

Jordan did not just play 
basketball, he was basketball. 
From the playground to the gym, 
from elementary school to the 
pros, he was the ambassador of 
the sport he loved, the idol of 
everyone who ever laced up a 
pair of basketball shoes. 
The impact he alone had on the 
growth of the NBA was as 
inuneasurable as his impact on 
the success of Nike, McDonalds, 
Wheaties and everything else he 
endorsed. 

The sky was the limit for this 
incredible athlete and with some 
of the gravity-defying things he 
could do in mid-air, you couldn't 
even be sure of that. 

But Jordan has always had 
troubles with the press. It 
bothered him that, despite being 
the best offensive and the best 
defensive player in the game and 
despite his ability to place an 
entire franchise on his back and 
carry it to title after title, he was 
still so often criticized for so 
many different reasons. He was 
criticized for shooting too much, 
for not shooting enough, for not 
having an outside jumper, for not 
driving the lane enough. 

The calm, cool Jordan became 
so fed up he refused to speak to 
the press during the 1993 finals 
after the press battered him about 
allegations of a late night trip to 
Atlantic City. 

Despite all of this, Jordan still 
averaged 41 points during the 
NBA finals and brought home 
his third straight playoff MVP 
award along with his third 
consecutive championship. 

The Bad Boys of Detroit 
couldn't rattle him. Charles 
Barkley was unable to get inside 
his head and the media's attempt 
at causing Jordan to shatter 
emotionally was just as 
unsuccessful. 

It took the death of his father 
to prove that this man was 



actually human. 

James Jordan's death was seen 
as just another obstacle that this 
master of composure would 
overcome. But his father was his 
best friend, the one person that 
the most idolized person in 
America looked up to. When 
Michael Jordan's father died, so 
did Michael's desire to play 
basketball. 

Jordan has done everything 
one can do in a sport he 
dominated from 1984 until 1993. 
Despite only ten years in the 
league, Jordan is the 15th all- 
time leading scorer, and his 32.3 
point per game average is the 
best mark in history. He's also 
been an all-star every year he's 
been in the league. 

"There's nothing more for me 
to accomplish on the basketball 
court." Jordan said at his 
memorable press conference. "I 
may one day decide to unretire, 
but right now, I'm comfortable 
with my decisiwi." 

Jordan's career in basketball 
has been magnificent, but he 
certainly will not miss being 
constantly in the public eye. 





;easo 


Jordan's accomD 


lishi 


Regular £ 


>n 






Year 


G 


FG%FT%Reb 


Asts Pts. 


1984-85 


82 


.515 .845 534 


481 


28.2 


1985-86 


18 


.457 .840 64 


53 


22.7 


1986-87 


82 


.482 ,857 430 


377 


37.1 


1987-88 


82 


.535 .841 449 


485 


35.0 


1988-89 


81 


.538 .850 652 


650 


32.5 


1989-90 


82 


.526 ,848 565 


519 


33.6 


1990-9 1 


82 


.539 .851 492 


453 


3L5 


1991-92 


80 


.519 .832 511 


489 


30.1 



A^?)' 




You would expect a lesser 
person to come back to the sport 
that has been his life forever. But 
Michael can do whatever he 
wants. He'll have more time 
with his family and more time on 
the golf course, and he certainly 
won't miss the constant trouble 
with the press. 

The death of his father made 
Michael realize that he didn't 
need basketball, but he may just 
return when he sees how much 
basketball truly needs Michael. 



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by Steve Moore 



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Page 30 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



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Personals 



AU, Thanks for the great mixer. 
Let's mix again as soon as 
possible. The brothers of Kappa 
Delta Rho. 

D-PHI-E, Congratulations to 
Laurie and Amy for 
Homecoming and good luck to 
the new pledge class. Have a 
great ALF! Love, your Deepher 
Darling, Phil. 

Delta Zeta would like to wish 
everyone a safe and fun-filled 
ALF weekend. 

To the brothers of Delta Chi, 
Thanks for a great mixer. It was 
fun going "around the world" 
with you. Let's do it again soon. 
Love, the sisters of Delta Zeta. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma welcomes 
the new associate members of 
Fall '93. Congratulations to 
Heidi Eaton, Gina Pfeifer, Staci 
Servey, and Misty Silvis. Good 
Luck girls! 



Beck, Roses are red. Last year 
your face was too. This year on 
your birthday - 1 definitely won't 
injure you! Happy 22nd 
birthday! Love, Jen. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon, The water 
was boiling and so were the men. 
XZS can't wait to go hot tubbing 
again. 

To Phi Sigma Kappa, The theme 
was wild and so was the night. 
You can tattoo us whenever you 
like. Love, ZZX. 

Sigma Tau Gamma, The mixer 
was such a "treat." Thanks for 
the great time! Love, Phi Sigma 
Sigma. 

Phi Sigma Sigma would like to 
welcome our new associate 
members: Susan H., Melanie B., 
Judy, Susan K., Lisa, Melanie 
H., Angle L., Wendy., Katherine, 
Paula, Angela B., Karen, Amy, 
Michelle, Kelly, Holly, Susan K., 
Jenny. We love you! 

Happy Birthday Jill! Love, your 
Zeta sisters! 

Theta Chi, Thanks for the great 
mixer - we'd "bond" with you 
any time! Love, the Zetas! 

Congratulations to our newest 
pledge, Amanda Damore. Love, 
the Zeta sisters. 

Congratulations to the Spring 
1993 pledge class: Kim Ebner, 
Chrisy Granger, Melisa Klody, 
Marie Kosanovich, Shelly 
Landowski, Joey Marquis, and 
Jen McCann. It's about time you 
were all together. Love, your 
sisters of Alpha Sigma Alpha. 

Theta Phi Alpha congratulates 
our newest pledge sisters: Tarry 
Burlingame, Karen Bums, Robin 
Cepikoff, Stacy Patterson, Lynn 
Yamber. Good Luck girls! 



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Hey Alphi Chi Rho - Thanks for 
the mixer! We had a great time 
"bonding" with you. Love, Theta 
Phi Alpha. 

Kristen Duncan: Happy 21st 
birthday. Congrat's on making 
homecoming court. Love, your 
big, Sheila. 

Alphi Phi Omega would like to 
welcome our new pledge 
brothers: Michelle Adams, Laura 
Banker, Laura Briggs, Jason 
Davis, Bob Emiger, Allison 
Esposito, Stacy Rongaus, Brian 
Smeal, Jay Smith, Kelly 
Tomlinson, and Corey Wright. 
Good luck! 

Sigma Chi - Thanks for the 
mixer, sorry no one went "BLT." 
We would love for your pledges 
to dance for us again soon. Love, 
D-PHI-E. 

The sisters of Delta Phi Epsilon 
would like to welcome back all 
their alumna for ALF weekend. 

Sig Tau Gamma - We're glad to 
be with the "winning" float 
builders again. Let's go all the 
way in 1993. Love, D-PHI-E. 

Good luck to Laurie Marmo and 
Amy Bowser - representing 
Delta Phi Epsilon in the Autumn 
Leaf Festival 1993. 

To our new AST Associate 
Members: Angle, Heidi K., 
Sherry, Jen S., Karen, Nikki, 
Lisa, Georgia, Heidi S., Marci, 
Gretchen, Silvia, Jen A., and 
Tammy. We welcome you to the 
love and lifetime friendships of 
AZT. We're so happy to have 
you! With love, from your future 
sisters of ALT. 

To the brothers of KDR, Thanks 
for the great time, Let's do it 
again! Love, The sisters of AZT. 
Congratulations Merrilyn, 
Kristen and Carrie on making 
Homecoming Court. Good luck. 
We love you. Your sisters of 
AXT. 

Spring Break '94! 

Campus Reps Needed 

• CANCUN • 

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• JAMAICA • 

• SOUTH PADRE ISLAND • 

• PANAMA CIT^ BEACH • 
• DAYTONA BEACH • 

• KEY WEST' 
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BREAKAWAY TOURS INC. 

1-800-214-8687 ^ 



To the brothers of Theta Chi, 
Thank you for choosing me as 
your new dream girl. I am 
looking forward to a fun and 
eventful year. I love you all. 
Love, Colleen. 

Thanks, Delta Zeta, for traveling 
"all around the world" with us. - 
your D.C. boys. 



Announcements 



Sunday Student Mass 

5:30 p.m. 

Immaculate Conception Church 

Main Street 

This Week (10/10): 

Homecoming '93 

Welcome Alumni, Parents & 

friends! 

Gospel: Matthew 22:1-14 



Sales and Service 



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$15.00/75 minutes, $25/2 hrs. 
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ITie Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Page31 




A/o known picture of Washington smiling exists. Economists believe Washington was 

unhappy because he felt he could have received a better deal on war supplies If he used a 

Citibank Classic Visa card, he would have been assured of getting the best price and probably 

would have been happier (A rtist rendering of how he would have appeared on the dollar.) 



The Economics of the Citibank classic visa 

card. How Student Discounts and Price Protection contribute to upward 

growth. A variety of factors have been suggested as contributing to the economic growth of students, including 

(1) more lottery winners between the ages of 18 and 22, (2) a 37% increase on earnings from bottle and can 
returns, (3) more students doubling earnings in the lightning round of game shows, and (4) the Citibank Classic 

Visa® card. It's the last one, however, that affects most students. % The Citibank Classic Visa card offers 
immediate savings to student cardmembers. You can save up to 26% on long distance calls versus AT&T with the 

free Citibank Calling Service^^ from MCI.^ And you can capitalize on a $20 Airfare Discount for domestic 

flights.^ Savings on mail order purchases, sports equipment, magazines and music also bound. Maximize these 

savings with a low variable interest rate of 15.4%^ and no annual fee, 
and you can significantly improve your personal bottom line (especially 
if one's net income tends to be pretty gross). Put another way, one 
might even have enough savings to reinvest in a CD or two (the 
musical kind, of course), f On the way to the record store, or any store 
for that matter, take stock of the 3 services concerned with purchases 
made on the Citibank Classic card. Citibank Price Protection assures 
one of the best prices. See the same item advertised in print for less, 

within 60 days, and Citibank will refund the difference up to $150.^ To 

protect these investments, Buyers Security^^ can cover them against 

accidental damage, fire or theft (ordinarily causes for Great Depressions) for 90 days from the date of purchase.^ 

And Citibank Lifetime Warranty^"^ can extend the expected service life of eligible products up to 12 years.^ % 
But perhaps the features which offer the best protection are your eyes, your nose, your mouth, etc. - all featured on 
The Photocard, the credit card with your photo on it. Carrying it can help prevent fraud or any hostile takeover of 
your card. (Insiders speculate that it makes quite a good student ID, too.) Even if one's card is stolen, or perhaps 

lost. The Lost Wallet^^ Service can replace your card usually within 24 hours, f So never panic. As we all know, 

panic, such as in the Great Panics of 1837, 1857, and 1929, can cause a downswing in a market. But with 24-hour 

Customer Service, there's no reason for it. A question about your account is only an 800 number away. (Panic of 

the sort experienced the night before Finals is something else again.) f Needless to say, building a credit history 

with the support of such services can only be a boost. You're investing in futures-that future car, etc. And knowing 

the Citibank classic Visa card is there in your wallet should presently 

give you a sense of security, rare in today's-how shall we say?-fickle 

market, f To apply, call. Students don't need a job or a cosigner. And 

call if you'd simply like your photo added to your regular Citibank 

Classic Visa card. Here's the number: 1-800-CITIBANK, extension 

19. ^The Law of Student Supply and Demand states, "If a credit card 

satisfies more of a student's unlimited wants and needs, whie 

reducing the Risk Factor in respect to limited and often scarce 

resources-with the greatest supply of services and savings 

possible-then students will demand said credit card." So, demand 

away-call. 

'Savings daim is based on a lO-minute nightAwckend call in the I.9II to 3,000 mileage band using MCl's Card Compatibility rates vs. ATm standard calling cait! rates, effective 4/93 Citibank Cdjjng 
Service longdistance usage cannot be applied to obuin benefits under any other MCI partner program or offer, including travel awand programs. Offer expires 6/30/94. Minimum ticket purchase pnce is 5100. 
Rebates are for Citibank student cardmembet^ on tickets issued by ISE Flights only. 'The Annual Percentage Rate for purchases is 15.4% as of 8/93 and may vary quarterly. The Annual Percenuge Rate lor cash 
advances is 198% If a finance charge is imposed, the minimum is 50 cents. There is an additional finance charge for each cash advance transaction equal to 2% of the amount of each cash advance transactum, 
however it will not be less than $2.00 or greater than $10.00. Teruin conditions and exclusions apply. Plea.sc refer to your Summary of Additional Program Information. Buyers Secunty is underwritten try i ne 
Zurich International UK Limited. 'Certain restnrtions and limiutions apply. Underwntlen by the New Hampshire Insurance Company Service life expectancy vanes by product and is at least the minimum 
based on retail industry dau Details of coverage are available in your Summary of Additional Program Information. Monarch* ^4otes are published by Monarch Press, a division of Simon & Schuster a 
Paramount Communications Company. Used by permission of the publisher. Citibank credit cards are issued by Citibank (South Dakou). N A. ,©1993 Citibank (South Oakota), N.A Member hUlt. 





CLASSIC 

*fX28 0012 3*ISb 18^0.. 






Not just Visa. Citibank Visa. 



J 



Page 32 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



Back by popular demand: The Godfather Predicts 

Florida State to finally ''kick" Miami jinx 



The Godfather is back, and just 
in time for one of the best 
weekends in college football. 
Back from a one year hiatus, I 
was a documented 70 percent 
winner last year and am looking 
for a big year this season. So 
here I am to give you my picks 
of the week. Call your bookie, 
because these are the picks you 
can count on. Make him an offer 
he can't refuse. If he does, send 
Big Vinny over to break his 
kneecaps. 

#3 Miami at #1 Fla. State -11 
Perhaps the biggest game of 



924 



the year, just like every other 
year, is this battle for bragging 
rights in the state of Florida. 
The Seminoles come into this 
game at 5-0, but more 
impressively, 5-0 against the 
spread. Now, you might say that 
Florida State hasn't played 
anybody. Well.. .they haven't, 
but they have proven to be the 
best team in the nation. 

There are just too many 
weapons for the Hurricanes to 
contend with, weapons nearly as 
dangerous as the ones I sell to 
Third World nations. The most 
notable is Heisman Trophy 



candidate Charlie Ward. What 
can you say about Ward, except 
that he can do it all. Running, 
passing, shooting, rebounding. 
Miami can't stop this two-sport 
wonder, they can only hope to 
contain him. They won't. On 
the odJer side of the ball, there is 
hard hitting Derrick Brooks, who 
has everyone in Tallahassee 
asking, "Marvin Jones who?" 
Brooks anchors one of the 
quickest and most talented 
defenses in the nation. 

Two great offenses, two great 
defenses, but all eyes will be on 
the kicking game. Can you say, 




Ray Henderson/ Clarion Call 
Slipping from their grasp: Tim Brown and the Golden Eagles are slowly watching their 
playoff aspirations squirt away. Clarion will try to get back on the winning track Saturday 
against Bloomsburg. 



"wide right?" Can you say, "It 
doesn't matter?" For the first 
time in three years the kickers 
will have absolutely nothing to 
do with the outcome. Too much 
speed, too many weapons, and 
not enough trash talking or 
camoflauge for Miami to even 
come close. Take Florida State 
in a sniff, sniff, sniff.. .do I smell 
a BLOWOUT Fla. State 35. 
Miami 14. 

#10 Michigan at Mich St. +11 

The Wolverines come into this 
game at 3- 1 and have won 29 
straight against the Big Ten plus 
one. Quarterback Todd Collins 
calls the shots for this potent 
offense, but its the running of 
Heisman candidate Tyrone 
Wheatley that makes this offense 
a kingpin. Wheatley visits the 
endzone an average of three 
times per game, and if it wasn't 
for Charlie Ward (and the fact 
that there's a contract out on 
him), Wheatley could be handed 
the Heisman right now. 

The Spartans have improved 
from last year, but not enough to 
give Michigan a game. 
Wheatley and company will 
have a bang-bang shoot 'em up 
(pardon the expression. It's from 
the line of work I'm in) time. 
Wolves 38, Michigan State 10. 
#17 Louisville at #20 West 
Virginia -f 1 

This brings us to the game of 
the day. Not since the Major 
Harris era has West Virginia 
fielded a good team. They enter 
Saturday with a mark of 4-0, 
after holding off a tough Virginia 
Tech team last week. 

Louisville also has an 
undefeated record, and they 
possess one of the most 



underrated running backs in the 
nation, Ralph Dawkins. The 
Cardinals are good, but they only 
beat Pitt by 22. (Pitt is a 40 
point underdog against Notre 
Dame this weekend, and rumor 
has it that John Majors may go 
back to his old job as British 
Prime Minister.) Take the "eers" 
and the point. WVU 24, 
Louisville 20. 

Bloomsbui^ at Clarion -3 

The Eagles won a tough game 

in Bloomsburg last year with the 

help of a 68 yard fumble 

recovery for a touchdown by 

Frank Andrews. That win ended 

a four game losing streak, and 

placed the Eagles on the road to 

the PSAC-West championship. 

After being embarrassed by the 

Scots last week. Clarion needs 

the same boost in 1993. They'll 

get it. Look for the offense to 

finally get it together, and 

Marlon Worthy to have a huge 
day both receiving and returning. 

The Eagles will give the huge 

Memorial Stadium crowd 

something to cheer about. 

Eagles 26, Bloomsburg 13. 

The big plate of spaghetti 
award goes to the Arizona 
Wildcats' defense. Desert Storm 
is giving up an unbelievable 0.2 
yard per carry average and six 
yards rushing per game. The 
Wildcats sit at #11. 

The black rose award goes to 
the entire team of Syracuse and 
whoever picked them #6 in the 
preseason. The Orangemen just 
flat out stink. 

Now that you have read this 
article, you're part of the family, 
and the only way you can 
walk away is in a pair of cement 
shoes. 



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Volume 74, Issue 6 The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsylvania October 14, 1993 



News 



Most want out 
Students speak out onl 
5(MnaIia pg. 61 



Lifestyles 

Life after death? 

Vop ghost hunters investigate! 
3arion pg- 101 



Sports 



Hey WiUie! 

The football team gets intc 
the ALF spirit pg- 191 



Clarion's 

Weather Outlook 



Thursday: 
Friday: 



Cloudy skies, 
high 60 
Chance of rain 
high 55 



Saturday: ParUy sunny 

high 56 
Sunday: Mostly sunny 

high 60 
Monday: Breezy, mild 

high 57 
Tuesday: Chance of rain 

high 55 
Wednesday: Partly cloudy 

high 53 



Index 



Ccanmentary pg.a 

News pg. 5 

TV Guide pg. lg| 

Lifestyles pg. 9 

Entertainment pg. 17| 

Sports pg. 19 

Classifieds pg- 23 



Clarion to get 
challenge money 



by Alan Vaughn 
Managing Editor 



Clarion has already received 
the first payment of nearly $1 
million as part of Governor 
Casey's tuition challenge 
program. 

Under the program, the 14 
state system schools and the four 
state related universities are 
eligible to receive about $200 
per Pennsylvania undergraduate 
student provided that the 
individual schools keep their 
tuition increases under 4.5 
percent. This year, tuition 
increased 4.4% ($126) to $2,954 
per year for in-state students. 

The amount is to be paid in 
quarterly installments. Thus far, 
Clarion has received $249,325. 

All of the state system schools 
kept tuition increases low 
enough to qualify for the 
additional funds, said Gary 
Tuma, press secretary for the 
Pennsylvania department of 
education. The 14 state schools 
together have qualified for 
$13.99 million in funds, 
averaging about $206 per 



Pennsylvania undergraduate 
student. This amount is on top of 
$357.9 million already 
appropriated. 

Including the state related 
schools, the amount released is 
$31,758,000. 

"We look better [financially] 
right now than we did at this 
time last year," said Comptroller 
John Francis. Cutbacks, said 
Francis, can be largely attributed 
to this. 

In comparison to in-state 
tuition, non-resident tuition 
jumped 20.09 percent this year 
to $7,352 per year, while out-of- 
state graduate tuition rose 23.83 
percent to $5,196 per year. 

Under a similar challenge 
program three years ago, the 
university only received 25 
percent of the expected amount. 

According to University 
Relations Director Ron Wilshire, 
"university officials do not 
anticipate a similar situation." 

Wilshire said that the 
university feels that if the 
remaining payments were not 
received the total budget would 
have to be reviewed. 



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Ray Henderson/ClarionCall 
Newly crowned Homecoming Queen, senior Merrilyn 
Murnyack and her escort Matt Dunlap. 



CUP's blood drive has undertones of urgency 



by Toni Ross 
Lifestyles writer & 
Michelle Sporer 
Editor-in -chief 



The challenge has been issued 
and both sides are out for blood - 
literally. In an effort to 
encourage campus communities 
to donate blood due to extfemely 
low supplies in the region, 
student governments at both 
Clarion University and Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania are 
working in conjunction with the 
American Red Cross in 
sponsoring competelive blood 
drives at each of the two rival 
schools. 

Whichever school surpasses 
their quota, as determined by the 
American Red Cross, by a 



greater number will have its flag 
flown over the losing 
institution's campus. In addition, 
both universities' presidents have 
agreed that the losing school will 
present a cake to the winning 
school's alumni at the November 
13 Clarion versus I.U.P. football 
game at I.U.P. 

I.U.P. held their blood drive 
approximately two weeks ago 
but failed to meet their quota of 
600 pints of blood within a two 
day Ume frame. 

Clarion's chance to taste 
victory, however, presents itself 
this Monday October 18 from II 
a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Gemmell 
Student Complex. Clarion's 
challenge is to meet 175 pints of 
blood in one day. 

Is Clarion up to the challenge? 



Student Senate President Gara 
Smith thinks so. "I believe in 
Clarion's ability to accomplish 
this goal. In fact, I'm extremely 
confident Clarion can double our 
quota." 

I.U.P.'s Student Congress 
President, James Leda shares 
some of Smith's confidence. 
"Your chances look pretty good," 
Leda said in a phone interview. 
However, he added that the 
football game is another matter 
altogether. 

And, while the competetive 
blood drive may be a fun 
challenge, the issue at hand is 
quite serious. According to 

Blood Services Aid Jesse 
Copenhaver.with the Clarion 
County chapter of the American 
Red Cross, blood suoolies for the 



county are dangerously low. 
"All (blood) types are, at what 
you would call, an extremely 
urgent level of need. We are 
within a hairsbreadth of calling 
on a national backup for 



coverage. 



In light of this, the Red Cross 
urges individuals age 17 or older, 
who weigh at least 105 pounds, 
and are in generally good health 
to give blood. Individuals can 
safely donate blood every 56 
days. 

Student Senate will be 
distributing prizes and gift 
certificates throughout the 
blmxlmobile. 

"I think it's a worthy cause," 
said Smith. "We must remember 
who the real winners are - the 
oeople who benefit from it " 



Celebrating over 70 years as a student newspaper 



Page 2 



The Clarion Cail: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



Opinion 



The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chief 

Alan Vaughn 

Managing Editor 

Rodney Sherman 

News Editor 

Amy Gerkin 

Features Editor 

Ben Vessa 

Sports Editor 

Ray Henderson 

Photography Editor 

Samantha White 

Ad Design 

Chris Clouse 

Advertising Manager 

Brigitte Josefczyk 

Circulation Editor 

& Interim 

Business Manager 

Hans Dovenspike 

Copy/Design Editor 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
jcontributions fron\ any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 12:00 p.m. on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
ihe Student Activity Fee and 
■iHv^|iisinP revenue. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 2380 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Coliimn 

Inch. ..$5 .50 

ClassiHed Ads...$1.00 for 

every !<► words every five 

words after are $.50 

Subscriptions 

Semester...$7.00 

Academic Year.. .$10.00 

The Clarion 

Call is 

printed on 

recycled 

newsprint 



w 




The way I see it 




News Editor 



The envelope 
please 

They call it "Testing Your HIV 
Status." I call it a wakeup call 
from God. 1 know the facts 
about AIDS. I know how it is 
contracted. I know that, like 
getting pregnant, it only takes 
one unprotected time. And I also 
know that, like getting pregnant, 
orotection isn't 100%. For years 
I played the roulette wheel with 
life and with the lives of my 
parmers. I knew the risks and 
yet I was unaccountable, not 
responsible, but mostly I thought 
I was invincible. 

My nightmare began a few 
months ago when I was treating 
myself for what seemed to be an 
incurable yeast infection. I 
almost never read the inserts 
inside the boxes of over-the 
counter medicines, but for 
whatever reason I read the insert 
that time. It said, in big bold 
print, that chronic yeast infection 
are a common symptoms of HIV 
infection in women. My heart 
sank and my mouth went dry. 
My mind raced through the 
pictures of the men with whom I 
had slept. They all looked 
normal. They were all middle to 
upper-middle class men with 
good jobs and nice cars. How 
could I possibly be infected? 

I called the AIDS hotline to 
get more information about 
symptoms and to also find out 
what my risk was to HIV 
infection. I was told that anyone 
who has had unprotected 
vaginal, oral, or anal sex in the 
last 12 years and whose HIV 
status was not known should be 
tested. That wasn't what I 
status was not known should be 
tested. That wasn't what 1 
wanted to hear. I wanted to be 
told that bright college-educated 
females were personally exempt 
from AIDS. 



When I hung up the phone my 
body started shaking and I threw 
up. I didn't want to know. 1 
didn't think I could handle the 
truth. HIV seemed so foreign, so 
outside my body. But the 
possibility existed that the 
disease could be just under my 
skin, preparing its attack on my 
immune system, preparing its 
psychological destruction of my 
family, my friends, and my life. 

Two weeks went by before I 
made an appointment with my 
doctor. I finally stopped running 
and hiding, and I faced the truth: 
right or wrong, I had had several 
sexual encounters without using 
a condom, and I could very well 
be carrying the HIV virus. It 
was my responsibility to myself 
and to my past and future 
partners to know the truth about 
my HIV status. 

The test was simple and 
anonymous. I had blood drawn, 
and then I waited seven 
agonizing days for the 
envelope that 

(Cont. on pg. 4) 



Can you nmxe the saddest 
piece of music you've ever 
hccird .' 1 heard my "saddest tune" 
Monday night on the evening 
news. At llie end of a memoriiU 
service for a 19 year-old man 
killed in Somalia last week, a 
lone uumpet sounded "Taps." 

The tune was sharp and 
mournful until the last few notes 
when the trumpeleer started to 
lose his emotional composure 
and the notes began to tremble. It 
always happens like that. 

"Taps will sound across the 
nation this week as the 14 men 
killed in a firefight in Mogadishu 
a week and a half ago are laid to 
rest. 

I'm not going to debate the 
pros and cons of the Somalia 
mission or the possibility of U.S. 
intervention in Bosnia. I won't 
dwell on the failed attempt to 
l^nd U.S. troops in Haiti 
Monday. Each is a damned if we 
do, damned if we don't, no win, 
can't lose situation. 

Katie Zaikoski went out this 
week in search of student and 
faculty opinion on the U.S. 
policy in Somalia. You will find 
some of the quotes on page six. 
Some people have given the 
issue a lot of thought, and while 



I don't neces.sarily agree with all 
of them, disagreement brings 
debate, and debate encourages 
thought. 

A disheartening trend can be 
found in Katie's notes though. 
Some students on this campus 
had no idea of what is happening 
in Somalia. It's bad enough that 
college educated men and 
women are unaware of world 
events, it is unforgivable to be 
indifferent or oblivious to the 
fact that 14 men were killed 
trying to carry out a 
humanitarian mission. 

Their ages ran from teen-ager 
to middle-aged. They very well 
could have been your kid 
brother, boyfriend, or father, yet 
some people set to graduate from 
this institution of higher learning 
cannot find on the map a dusty 
cornesf ipX^he. world 
American men and women 
Continue to risk their lives. 

For some young "adults" 
picking up a newspaper or 
catching the evening news cuts 
into 35 cent draft beer or the 
Beavis and Butthead show. They 
prefer the same old song and 
dance of blissful ignorance. 

And that song folks, is ahnost 
as sad as "Taps." 



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The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



Page J 



Reader Responses 



What about us? 

Dear Editor: 

I am writing this letter in 
response to the article, "Gay 
Students Face Challenge." The 
article stressed that all campuses 
should have centers where 



people could understand the 
problems and situations of 
homosexuals and bisexuals. 
Ohio State University has such a 
center on its campus. There they 
can enjoy a safe atmosphere 
among people who understand 
and respect them as individuals. 



What about a center such as 
that in Clarion? For those who 
do not know, no, we do not have 
one here. I believe that we all go 
to .school in a very close-minded 
environment. No one 
understands who we are or what 
we stand for, but instead we are 



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suffocated by stereotypes. These 
stereotypes have been able to 
continue because people are 
ignorant. That is why we need a 
center to combat the ignorance 
on campus. From there, 
ignorance could change into 
understanding. 

I and many of my friends live 
everyday in fear of being 
attacked by some close-minded 
person, either physically, 
verbally, or both. It is very hard 
to keep a positive attitude and be 
proud about who we are when 
we are smothered by the 
ignorance of the straight world. 
However, straight people also 
live in fear; fear of what they do 
not understand - homosexuality. 
Out of their ignorance comes 
violence against us. I never 
expect anyone to understand me, 
only to respect me for who I am. 
We are no different, only in 
those we love. We deserve 
equality, but instead get swept 
under the carpet as inferior. 

There are many homosexuals 
on Clarion's campus. There are 
also many who do not 
understand us and do not give us 
a chance. Perhaps we need a 
center like that at Ohio State to 
help those understand better that 
we are all in this world together, 
whether gay or straight. No one 
needs to be alienated anymore in 
the world of straight vs. gay. I 
feel the way that I do because 
that is who I am. It is not a 
disease. 

Homosexuality is something 
that I any many others have 
chosen and are proud of. But 
everyday we have to journey out 
into the "straight world" and are 
expected to follow the rules 
there. There does not need to be 
two separate worlds but one 
world, built on understanding for 
each other. 
Name withheld by request 



Parking woes 
continue 

Dear Editor: ■^— ^— -— 
We call it fraud! The school 
sells us a ticket for $15 and there 
is nowhere to park. It is almost 
two months into the semester 
and we still park about ten 
minutes away. The school should 
lake the responsibility to make 
parking less stressful. I live half 
iin hour away and have to leave 
■m hour early just to have time to 



walk to class. It is pathetic! Take 
heed to these words Public 
Safety because our feelings of 
immen.se hostility and frustration 
are shjired by many commuters. 
Take notice at the depletion of 
permit sales the next time you 
attempt to "steal" $15 from the 
hard-working student body! 

Frustrated students, 

Susan Drayer and 

Jeanne Yount 

Drayer is a sophomore English 

major with a minor in French 

Yount is a junior Elementary 

Education major 

The cycle of 
exploitation 

uear Lditor: 

Two flyers during Rush Week 
caught my attention and 
infuriated me. Both the Sigma 
Phi Epsilon and the Sigma Chi 
fraternities attempted to grab the 
attention of the "well balanced" 
men of this campus by 
publicizing themselves through 
the use of the most commonly 
used image - the female form. 

A bikini contest one night and 
a hot legs contest another made 
me think of how degrading these 
men are of women. They 
willingly exploit us just to 
publicize themselves and gain 
membership to their 
organization. These guys ( I 
cannot give them enough respect 
and refer to them as men) think 
they have the power to controlus 
and use our bodies as objects. 

How can they call themselves 
"well-balanced?" They are 
tipping the scale of equality, 
making it and themselves, 
extremely unbalanced. However, 
on the other side of the scale, 
there are women who place 
themselves into the position of 
objectivity. These women do not 
necessarily realize they are being 
used because they are 
conditioned to live up to those 
standards and act "like a woman 
should." They are unable to 
recognize this fact because the 
images seen through the media 
feeds their minds and persuades 
them into believing that THAT is 
what men want. They feel they 
must live up to these standards 
so that they are "proper" women. 
When these women contribute 
to this cycle, they are letting men 
believe it's alright to treat ihem 



Cont, on pg. 4 



Page 4 



The ClJifibrt Calif 'thur!>ddy; October 14, 19^3 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14,1993 



Page 5 



Hide Park 

(cont. from pg. 2) 



conuuncd Jiuic 1Xk'"s results. It 
was the longest, most soul- 
searching week of my life. 1 
phuined my death. I picked out 
guardians for my children. I 
though about how I had gotten 
the disease, if I had it, and how 
having sex didn't automatically 
make me mature. 

I realized that sex is a very 
powerful force and just like 
guns, power, or drugs, it 
deserves respect and complete 
understanding before it is used. 

1 thought of how during the 
last 4 years I have known one 
person who died from AIDS and 
know one person who knows 
that he is infected with the HIV 
virus. 

I avoided listening to "The 
Last Song" by Elton John and 
refused to watch "And the Band 
Played On" on HBO about the 



origins of the AIDS epidemic. 
No matter what I did, though. I 
couldn't ignore the disease. 
AIDS was in the paper, on the 
television news, and in my 
children's health lessons in 
school. 1 tried to find peace. I 
talked to God. I came to the 
conclusion that whatever the 
results were, AIDS was a part of 
my life, whether it was living 
with it or living my life so as not 
to contact it. 

Finally day seven came. The 
doctor ripped open the envelope 
and said "It's negative." Relief 
poured over me like a tidal wave 
and I cried hysterically. I cried 
for myself, my children, and for 
my former lovers. I cried 
because my life would never be 
the same. I cried because I got 
another chance to listen, to learn, 
and to help those who weren't as 



lucky as me. 

You don't just wake up one 
morning healthy and die of 
AIDS that evening. The HIV 
virus can live inside you for 10 
years or more. And if you think 
putting together a family tree is 
difficult, imagine the sex partner 
tree you must put together for 
everyone with whom you've had 
sex. Each partner has a branch 
on which their partner's partners 
branch hangs. 

So next time you decide to 
have sex with someone, whether 
you are drunk at a party, dating 
for several months, or are 
considering marriage, remember 
how crowded your bed really is. 
You are responsible for your 
physical and mental health. And 
being responsible means more 
than rolling on a condom. 
Name withheld by request 



Jackson 



by Alan Vaughn 
Managing Editor 



"Young America, you have the 
capacity, you have the will. 
Don't let this moment pass. 
Keep this moment alive," said 
Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, telling the 
youth of America that they have 
to "move forward to hope, not 
backward by fear." 

The nationally known orator 
and civil rights activist was 
speaking at Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania, addressing issues 
of concern for today's youth. 

Students, Jackson said, are the 
source of change in America, so 
much more so than the courts, 
the president or the legislature. 
There is much that the 
iwentysomething generation has 
to accomplish, Jackson said, but 
they must overcome obstacles 
first in order to fight for change. 

If the youth are scared of guns 
and murder, they don't have the 
energy to fight for health care, 
Jackson said. 

"One never knows when the 
door of opportunity will swing 



open and you will have to 
become a Rosa Parks or Martin 
Luther King, Jr.," said Jackson. 
"Every generation has its 
challenge and its moral 
imperative." 

The twentysomething 
generation has two sets of 
probems facing it said Jackson. 

The first quagmire is the 
erosion of the tax base and the 
loss of jobs. The presidential 
response to this, said Jackson, is 
not increased investment, but a 
pledge to put more police on the 



streets. Clinton promised four 
years of investment at $50 
billion dollars per year re- 
investment in America, but so 
far has been all cut and no 
reinvestment. 

The second set of problems is 
the "moral degeneracy" that the 
youth have come to live with. 

"Our ethical standards have 
dropped so low [that] we have 
no guilt or shame," said Jackson. 
"In our arrogance, we have lost 
our sense of shame." 



Letters to the editor. . . 

(Cont. from pg. 3) 



that way; this gives the males 
permission, and the cycle 
continues. 

Where do we aim to break this 
cycle? Do we go straight to the 
source or do we educate the 
people lower than the hierarchy 
and grow in mass? There is 
strength in numbers, so the 
saying goes; this means that the 
stronger we become, the more 
powerful we can be against the 



patriarchy. It is when this system 
is deteriorated by our unified 
strength, these negative images 
of women will cease and our 
human abilities will rise. 

CarUt Kostek 

One proud feminist 

Kostek is a sophmore Early 

Childhood and Elementary 

Education Major with a minor 

in Women 's Studies 



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Copies of class schedules 

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beginning October 18. 



■■■IF— ■ I I 1 1 1 1 1 My— *■"> " ' " » 

Dave Barry 

Dave's real world 



collides with TV 

©The Miami Herald 



The reason I agreed to be in an 
episode of a TV situation comedy 
was that the role was perfect for 
me. You want to choose your roles 
carefully, as an actor. You want to 
look for roles in which you can 
display the range, the depth, the 
infinitely subtle nuances of your 
acting talent. 

"It's just one word," the director 
said. "You say, "Howdy."' 

"I'll do it, " I said. A role like that 
comes along once in a lifetime. 

The TV show -- which might 
even still be on the air as you read 
this -- is called "Dave's World." It's 
loosely based on a book and some 
columns I wrote. I use the term 
"loosely" very loosely. There's no 
way they could just take my 
columns and turn them directly 
into a TV series; every episode 
would last four minutes, and end 
with all the major characters being 
killed by an exploding toilet. So 
they have professional writers 
supplying dramatic elements that 
are missing from my writing, such 
as plots, characters and jokes that 
do not involve the term "toad 
mucus." 

I worked hard on "Howdy," 
memorizing it in just days. 
Depending on the scene, I could 
deliver the line with various 
emotional subtexts, including 
happiness ("Howdy!"), sorrow 
("Howdy!"), anger (Howdy!") and 
dental problems ("Hmpgh!"). 

Then, just before I flew to Los 
Angeles for the filming, the 
director called to tell me that they 
had changed my role. In my new 
role, I played a man in an 
appliance store who tries to buy 
the last air conditioner, but gets 
into a bidding war for it with 
characters who are based, loosely, 
on me and my wife, played by 
Harry Anderson and DeLane 
Matthews. 

In my new role, I had to say 17 
words, not ONE of which was 
"Howdy!" I was still memorizing 
my part when I got to the stiidio. It 
was swarming with people: 
camera people, light people, sound 
people, bagel people, cream 
cheese people, people whose sole 
function -- this is a coveted union 
job, passed down from father to 
son -- is to go "SSHHH!" You, the 
actor, have to say your lines with 
all these people constantly staring 
at you, PLUS the director and the 
writers keep changing the script. 
The actors will do a scene, and the 
director will say, "OK, that was 
perfect, but this time. Bob, instead 
of saying, What's for dinner?' you 
say, 'Wait a minuXe! Benzene is 
actually a hydrocarbon!' And say it , 
with a Norwegian accent. Also, we 
think maybe your chfifacter shpuld 
have, no arnis,", ., ,f •_..•: , 
My Tines didn't' change much, 



but as we got ready to film my 
scene, I was increasingly nervous. 
I was supposed to walk up to the 
appliance salesman and say: "I 
need an air conditioner." I had 
gone over this many times, but as 
the director said "Action!" my 
brain - the brain is easily the least 
intelligent organ in the body -- lost 
my lines, and began frantically 
rummaging around for them in my 
memory banks. You could actually 
see my skull bulging with effort as 
I walked onto the set, in front of 
four TV cameras, a vast technical 
crew and a Live Studio Audience, 
with no real idea what I was going 
to say to the appliance salesman 
("I need a howdy"). 

But somehow I remembered my 
lines. The director seemed 
satisfied with my performance, 
except for the last part, where 
Harry Anderson, outbidding me 
for the air conditioner, hands the 
salesman some takeout sushi and 
says, "We'll throw in some squid," 
and I become disgusted and say, 
"Yuppies." (If you recognize this 
dialogue, it's because it's very 
similar to the appliance-buying 
scene in "Hamlet.") 

"That was perfect, Dave," said 
the director. (This is what directors 
say when they think it sucked.) 
"But when you say 'yuppies,' make 
it smaller," 

So we re-did the scene, and as 
we approached my last line, I was 
totally focused on doing a smaller 
"yuppies." Then I noticed that (a) 
the other actors weren't saying 
anything, and (b) everybody in the 
studio was staring at me, waiting. I 
had clearly messed up, but I had 
no idea how. This was a time to 
think fast, to improvise, to come 
up with a clever line that would 
save the scene. So here's what I 
did: I fell down. (It's a nervous 
habit I have. Ask my wife.) 

When I got up, I explained that 
I'd been waiting for Harry to say 
the squid line. 

"They took that out," somebody 
said. 

"They took out the SQUID?" I 
said. "The squid is GONE? " 

It turned out that everybody else 
knew this, including probably the 
Live Studio Audience. So we had 
to do that part again, with my 
brain feverishly repeating "No 
squid! Smaller yuppies!" 

That time we got through it, and 
my television career came to an 
end, and I went back to being, 
loosely, a newspaper columnist. I 
have not, however, ruled out the 
possibility of starring in a spinoff. 
I am thmking of a dramatit action 
series about a hero who, each 
week; tries to buy pn air 
conditioner; 1 have a great line for 
ending this colunui, butyl, cant 
remember what it is 



News 



Could be installed this semester 



Cable TV service agreement reached 



by Christy Williams 
News Writer 



A tentative agreement has been 
reached between Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and 
TCI of Clarion cable company to 
supply cable television service to 
all residence halls. 

In an agreement reached 
Wednesday afternoon, the cable 
company has agreed to wire the 
remaining rooms which do not 
currently have service before the 
end of the semester. 

The agreement is pending final 
approval from Uie Legal Council 
for the State System of Higher 
Education (SSHE), in 
Harrisburg, and TCI's parent 
company in Denver, CO. 

Director of Resident Life, 
Barry Morris, said late 
Wednesday afternoon, "Both 
local parties have signed a 
contract. Now, we need federal 
approval. 

"The University has sent the 
contract to Harrisburg for 
approval, and TCI has sent the 
contract to Denver. We can't 
guarantee they will approve it. If 
they do, arrangements will be 
made to prepare a schedule of 
when we can begin talking to 
individual students." 

As for an actual date of 
installation, Morris said, "If tHey 
sign, and we get no problem 
from the students, we may be 
able to install cable in at least 



some residence halls by the end 
of the fall semester." 

According to Morris, complete 
installation of cable in Wilkinson 
Hall, which has had the service 
for some time, took only one 
week, but he added the building 
was empty at the time. 

Another option the University 
is considering is to only install 
cable service in the rooms that 
are occupied by students who 
presently want cable hook up in 
their rooms. 

This could present a wide 
variety of problems because 
when new students arrive cable 
installation would have to begin 
all over again. 

Morris prefers the option of 
putting cable service into all the 
residence hall rooms at one time. 
The University hopes to pick one 
hall to begin installation as soon 
as possible. 

Ben, Call, general manager of 
TCI of Clarion, -has been, 
negotiating the agreement with 
the University. 

"TCI is prepared to provide 
cable service to the student 
residence halls as soon as the 
University gets the contract 
signed. We have the equipment 
on hand, and we can start 
inmiediately." 

During the sununer orientation 
sessions, incoming students were 
promised that by the start of this 
fall semester cable hook ups 
would be installed in all of the 




Jim Collins / Clarion Call 
Students won't be forced into TV lounges If they decide to have cable service turned on in 
their rooms. An agreement has been reached to supply the service 



University residence halls. 

"The University had told us 
that all halls were going to be 
wired with cable by this year, so 
that is what we told the incoming 
freshmen." said Penny Farmery, 
Orientation leader and senior 
secondary education social 
studies major. 

Currently the only residence 
hall with complete cable 
accessibility is Wilkinson Hall. 
Nair Hall and Campbell Hall 



have cable hook ups in the 
graduate rooms and resident 
director rooms, and all of the 
halls have cable in the television 
lounges. 

Carla Veronesi, freshman 
Speech Pathology major stated, 
"I was informed that the dorms 
were going to have cable hook 
ups this year, so I went out and 
bought a new television set. 
What a waste of money. I cannot 
get a single channel." 



Ben Vessa III , Senior 
Communications major and 
resident assistant in Campbell 
hall is one of the students with a 
strong opinion about this 
situation. 

"A lot of people moved from 
off campus into the dorms 
because they were informed 
there would be cable. When we 
didn't have cable at the 
beginning of the year it caused a 
lot of tension ." 



Named for chemistry professor 



New scholarship award planned for Venango campus 



courtesy of 
University Relations 



An anonymous $10,000 
contribution will fund an 
endowed Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania scholarship in 
honor of long-time professor Dr. 
Glenn R. McElhattan. 

The Clarion University 
Foundation received the 
anonymous contribution 
designated for the Dr. Glenn R. 
McElhattan Scholarship 
Endowment. McElhattan is a 
professor of chemistry at the 
Venango Campus of Clarion 
University in Oil City. 



The new scholarship will be 
awarded next spring for payment 
during the 1994-95 academic 
year to high school seniors 
enrolling at Venango Campus. 
The scholarship winners will be 
selected by the Venango Campus 
Scholarship Committee and will 
be required to demonstrate high 
academic ability and success. 
The size of the award will be 
determined at a later date. 

"We are grateful for this 
anonymous contfibution to the 
endowment fund," said Harry 
Tripp, vice president for 
university advancement and 
executive director of the Clarion 



University Foundation. "It will 
provide a base for needed 
scholarship funds and serve as a 
tribute to the accomplishments 
of Dr. McElhattan and his 
commitment to the students of 
Clarion University's Venango 
Campus. The endowment 
contribution will be a lasting 
benefit for students, with only 
interest being used to fund the 
scholarship." 

McElhattan has worked to 
increase scholarship 

opportunities for students at 
Venango Campus, having served 
for over eight years as the chair 
of the Venango Campus 



Scholarship Committee. During 
this time period the number of 
scholarships grew nearly 400 
percent from eight to 40. 

"The committee members and 
myself worked with a number of 
local businesses and clubs to add 
scholarships from the campus," 
said McElhattan. "I feel very 
strongly about students having 
scholarship opportunities. I am 
pleased to have additional 
scholarship added through this 
anonymous source." 

McElhattan, a resident of RD4 
Franklin, has taught chemistry at 
Venango since 1968. A Clarion 
County native and graduate of 



Keystone High School, he 
obtained a B.S. in education 
from Clarion State Teachers 
College in 1956, a M. S. in 
chemistry from Western Reserve 
University in 1963, and an Ed.D 
from the University of 
Pittsburgh. 

He taught chemistry and 
physics at Rocky Grove High 
School from 1959-68 and was a 
night school program/continuing 
education teacher for 
Pennsylvania State University in 
1966-67. He served in Uie U.S. 
Marine Corps as an artillery 
officer and aerial observer from 
1956-59. 



Page 6 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 7, 1993 



News Feature 



CUP students voice opinions on Somalia 



by Katie Zaikoski 
News ^^^iter 



Over the past two weeks, 
events in Somalia have made 
front page news across the 
nation. As tensions mounted in 
the African nation, 17 American 
soldiers were killed in a weekend 
fire-fighi Oct. 2. The American 
public was shocked and angered 
as Somalis dragged the body of a 
slain U.S. soldier through the 
dusty su^ts of Mogadishu. 

On Oct. 7, President Clinton 
ordered 5,300 more uoops into 
the area, along with heavy armor 
support and increased off-shore 
naval support. Clinton said the 
humanitarian missions must 
continue. 

Meanwhile, on Capitol Hill, 
the demand for U.S. wididrawal 
was being issued by members of 
both political parties. Calls for 
the resignation of Defense 
Secretary Les Aspin were made 
by several members of Congress 
who were upset over Aspin's 
earlier refusal to reinforce the 
troops in Somalia with tanks and 
armored personnel carriers. 

On Clarion's campus the 
students and faculty expressed 
their opinions in a survey 
conducted after the Clinton 
announcement of increased uoop 
sttength. 

• "I think we should pull all 
troops out. We went over there to 
help then defeat them, we're 
getting killed, we're not the bad 
guys so we should pull all tfoops 
out" Gwen Neal, freshman, Pre- 
Law 

• "I just don't believe in it, I 
don't think our servicemen 



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should be killed for any other 
countries anymore. I'm from the 
Vietnam era, that's what they can 
do with it, say good-bye." Laura 
Eisenman, cafeteria worker. 
• "I think we definitely need to 
consider whether we're in there 
as relief or as an invading force 
because right now, we started out 
as one thing and we're becoming 
another." D.J. Sylvis, second 
year senior, general studies 



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clans and then there would be no 
problems." Craig Waringo, desk 
clerk for game room 
• "The whole bit was a bunch of 
political crap in the first place so 
if they wouldn't have got their 
butt in there trying to get 
somebody out of it, and try to get 
their little bit out of it, then they 
wouldn't be there in the first 
place." Malcolm Mosley, junior, 
accounting 



there we might as well put more 
troops in." Tyson Schlosser, 
freshman 

• "1 think that Somalia is kind of 
scary because it could be another 
Vietnam but it doesn't seem the 
United Nations is doing any 
good, I can't imagine that there 
isn't anything that we can do, we 
ought to do something. It's not 
up to us to kick Adid out of 
power, just to make sure that 




AP photo 

Members of Bravo Company, 1st battalion. 87th Infantry, board a C-5 transport plane 
Sunday at GrIffis Air Base in Rome, New York. The soldiers were bemg sent to remforce 
the U.S. troops already in Somalia. 



• "Half of me says diey should 
leave them alone and the other 
half of me says they should help 
them." Line Hilowij, sophomore, 
English 

• "I think we should get them out 
of there." Vikki Whistner, 
cashier at University book store 

• "Like I said a long time ago 
when we first went in there, they 
should of gone in and taken 
away all the guns from all the 



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"I think that there are more 
concerns in the U.S. and that we 
should be more concerned with 
ourselves before we get involved 
in another country's problems." 
Katrina Helmick, French 
International Business and 
Economics 

• "I think it's a complicated 
situation and I react in two 
different levels. We owe it to the 
United Nations to remain 
involved in Somalia when we 
made that pledge and if we pull 
out now we are admitting that 
Adid has won. This strong arm 
tactic that he has employed will 
bring us to our knees. On the 
other hand, my gut feeling is that 
we should get out, the cost of 
human lives is one I wouldn't 
want to pay." Harold Jacobson, 
Pastor of Grace Lutheran Church 

• "I feel that the United States 
should either pull totally out of 
Somalia or send more troops in. I 
think what Clinton did by 
sending more troops was smart 
but I don't feel that we really 
need to be there, but since we're 



everyone is out." Doug Sheldon, 
junior, geography. 

• "I don't mean to sound 
inhumane or anything, but I feel 
that we should completely pull 
out of SomaUa because it's such 
a vulnerable situation. There's 
talk of that possibly being 
another Vietnam and to me as 
inhumane as it sounds, I think 
we should just torch it and get 
out of there." John Echenoz, 
Pizzamore employee 

• "I think we should stay there 
and help out." Phil Plant, junior 
•"We should just pull out and let 
them deal with it themselves. I 
think it's terrible the way they 
are treating our servicemen over 
there and I just feel that we 
should get out." Sharon 
Yonkoski, third semester 
freshman. Business 

• "It looks to me that trie support 
of humanitarian relief is not 
going to do the job. I think they 
should orderly withdraw the 
strength that the president is 
proposing. 1 don't think that we 
can just pull out tomorrow 



without leaving a lot of unhappy 
people behind. It's just an 
unfortunate situation." Dr. James 
Knickerbocker, English 

Deparunent 

• "I think we should pull all 
troops out of Somalia." 
Stephanie Dewire, sophomore, 
undecided 

• "We should definitely get out 
of Somalia as soon as possible." 
Julie Smith, freshman, undecided 

• "I think they should be out of 
there now, or very soon. I'm 
comfortable with the idea of 
March as long as we are out of 
there by March. It seems to me 
that we aren't doing any good, 
I'm not sure that we are wanted 
there, I think we have probably 
overstayed. People get hurt, 
that's not the problem we should 
of expected some people to get 
hurt going in there for a war but 
I don't think we're really doing 
any good there." Dr. Marite 
Haynes, Psychology 

• "I think that we have already 
wasted too many human lives 
over there. We can't be safe in 
all of their country, we have too 
many people who are starving in 
this country that we should help 
before we go fighting over there. 
Now they are just fighting 
against us and we're wasting 
lives." Julie Sherlock, senior. 
Psychology 

• "I think we should stick widi it. 
Cutting and running is not a 
good idea especially because 
something becomes unpopular 
and you just decide to give up. 

"I'm not particularly 
enthusiastic about military 
adventures but if you get into 
them and you don't have an easy 
victory and you get into 
something where you don't look 
that good and then you cut and 
run, well then everyone knows 
what you're doing." Roger Horn, 
librarian 

• "1 don't think we should be 
over there, I think we should just 
stay here because we have 
enough problems and we should 
help out with what's going on 
here." Amy Robeson, freshman, 
Elementary Education 

• "I'm in the reserves and I partly 
think that we should be over 
there and I partly think that we 
shouldn't" Scott Emerick, third 
semester freshman, undecided. 

• "With the recent turn of events, 
it would seem obvious that our 
presence is not welcome and 1 
believe we should remove our 
forces from that area." Benjamin 
Fisler, freshman, theatre. 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



Page? 



Drinking games may be far 
more dangerous than you think 



courtesy of 

College Press Service 

Chug-a-lug and other drinking 
games are not as harmless as 
college students think, warn two 
researchers in a recently 
published study. 

Nearly 4,000 alcohol- 
consuming students from 58 
American colleges and 
universities were surveyed about 
the games they play when 
drinking. 

The study was done by David 
Hanson, a professor of sociology 
at Potsdam College of the State 
University of New York, and 
Ruth Engs, professor of applied 
health science at Indiana 
University of Fort Wanye, Ind. 

While students who identified 
themselves as "light" or 
"moderate" drinkers experienced 
few alcohol related problems, 
those who played a drinking 
game within the preceeding year 
significantly increased the 
probability of negative 
conquences in 15 of 17 drinking- 
related behaviors, the report 
says. 

The behaviors included 
missing classes, getting low 
grades, trouble with the law, 
violent behavior or property 
damage. 



More than twice a.s many game 
players as non-game players 
experienced difficulties in most 
categories, such as driving while 
drinking. Twice the number of 
game players as non-game 
players also had fears that they 
may be alcoholics. 




Ray Henderson / Clarion Call 
Drinking games can be 
dangerous to your health 
and grades. 

Chug-a-lug contests, which 
identify winners by those who 
consuifie die most alcohol in a 
time period, and "quarters," a 
game that involves flipping a 



Ethics essay contest announced 



Clarion University seniors are 
eligible to enter two ethics essay 
contests with the opportunity to 
win up to $5,000 in the national 
contest. Seniors interested in the 
contests must be graduating in 
Dec. 1993 or the spring of 1994. 

The essays can be entered in 
the Clarion Ethics Essay Contest 
and the National Elie Wiesel 
Ethics Essay Contest. Deadline 
for entry in the national 
competition is Jan. 4, 1994, and 
the deadline for the Clarion 
contest is Feb. 1, 1994. 

Prizes for the national contest 
range from the first place prize 
of $5,000, down to $500 for an 
honorable mention. The winner 
of the Clarion contest will 
receive $100, and a second $100 
may be awarded in the event of a 
tie. Honorable mention in the 
Clarion competition carries no 
cash award but would enhance a 
vita. 

Some sample topics for the 
essays: 

• What are our ethical 
obligations to preserve and 
protect our physical environment 



and natural resources? 

• What are the significant 
moral or ethical issues raised by 
technology in the 1990s? 

• How should we respond to 
new, and not so new, ethical 
issues in business, medicine, law, 
govemment and human rights? 

• What are the most important 
moral choices we face today? 

Seniors in all fields of study 
are eligible to enter the contests. 
Members of Clarion University 
faculty from many different 
areas have volunteered their 
assistance to entrants. Interested 
seniors may contact any of the 
following faculty for guidelines 
or advice: Bill Barnes, Biology ; 
Julia Bartkowiak, Philosophy; 
Edward Caropreso, Education; 
Lois Green, English; Mark 
Haggerty, Economics; Susan 
Hilton, Communications; Jean 
Rumsey, Philosophy; and 
Franklin Takei, Philosophy. 

Clarion University has been 
participating in the National 
contest for three years through 
the sponsorship of the 
Philosophy faculty and the 
CoUcce ot Arts and Sciences. 



quarter into a mug of beer to 
designate the person who has to 
drink the contents, were 
identified as two popular campus 
drinking games. 

Hanson and Engs stated that 
drinking game behavior should 
receive greater attention from 
campus alcohol prevention 
programs and messages. 
The two researchers concluded, 
however, that messages that 
stress abstinence from drinking 
have proved to not be effective 
among college students. 

"Light" and "moderate" 
drinkers were defined in the 
study as those who drank no 
more than three to four drinks no 
more than once a week, or five 
or more drinks no more than 
once a month. 

"Heavy" drinkers were defined 
as those who drank more than 
five drinks at any one sitting 
once a week or more. 

Many students are encouraged 
in their drinking endevors by 
drink specials offered by bars 
near campuses. 

Some bars near college 
campuses offer different drink 
specials every night of the week, 
leading some researchers think 
the offers lead to binge-drinking 
by some students. 



The Clarion Call 
needs proof-readers. 

All majors 
welcome 

Communications 
majors can earn 
their print co- 
curricular working 
one and a hall hours 
a week. 



Call Hans at the 

Clarion Call 

226-2380 

News, Features 

and Sports 

writers are also 

needed. 



Public Safety 
Blotter 



The following is a brief .synopsis of criminal investigations 
conducted by Public Safety for the week of Oct. 02, through Oct. 
10, 1993. 

A fire alarm station was activated on the forth floor of Njiir Hall on 
Oct. 2 at approximaely 5:54 a.m. Incident is under investigation. 

A banner (ASA) was removed from the Chandler lobby between the 
hours of 2:00 and 4:00 p.m. on Oct 5. The banner is six feet in length 
and three feet wide with red and white colors. 

A fire alarm station was pulled on the sixth floor of Wilkinson Hall 
on Oct. 8, at approximately 3:20 a.m. Incident is under investigation. 

Between the hours of 3:30 and 7:30 a.m. on Oct. 8, a sink in the 
men's restroom on the "B" wing, forth floor in Campbell Hall, was 
pulled away from the wall. The incident is under investigation. 

On Oct. 9, at approximately 12:30 a.m., a student was cited for 
Public Drunkeness after being observed straggering and falling to the 



ground. 



If anyone has any information concerning these or other crimes, 
please contact Public Safety at 226-2111. 



Habitat for Humanity 
Homeless for a Weekend 

Nov. 5-6 

Sleep out in the park across from the courthouse 
For information, cKl Lynn at 2711 or Kelly at 3524 



THE HEAT 
OF THE HIGHT. 

Want it hot? We've got it. Saucy Meatball and 

hearty sirloin Steak & Cheese. Steamin' hot subs 

on fresh baked bread with free fixin's. If you're 

looking for a hot time, come to Subway. 





36 South 8th Avenue, Clarion 226-7131 



iSUBUjnv^ 



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i i 






Page 8 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



Outside Clarion 



U.S. troops blocked from landing in Haiti 



courtesy of 
Associated I*ress 



National 

U.S. troops blocked in Haiti 

Amiy-baciicd toughs, warning 
of another Somalia, blocked 
American troops from landing as 
part of a IJ.N. peace mission in 
Haiti on Monday and drove 
away U.S. diplomats waiting to 
«jreet them. 

A bimd of 25 to 50 men, some 
of them armed, then beat up 
merchants in the nearby market 
and fired guns while roving 
through the capital city, Port-Au- 
Prince. 

No casualties were reported. 
ITie gunmen later took over the 
state -run radio station. 

U.S. and U.N. officials said the 
disturbances would not halt the 
overall peace mission. 

Two Americans win medicine 
Nobel Prize 

Massachusetts based scientists 
Phillip A. Sharp and Richard J. 
Roberts were named the co- 
recipients of this year's Nobel 
Prize for medicine and will split 
the $825,000 prize. 

The two men knew of each 
other's work but were not 
collaborating when they made 
their discoveries that changed 
scientist's understanding about 
DNA make-up and helped 
launch the field of 
biotechnology. 

Sharp, 49, a native of 
Falmouth, Ky., heads the biology 
department at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

Roberts. 50, a native of Derby, 
England, works at New England 
Biolabs in Beverly, Mass. 

In the wake of the two men's 
work, scientists found that in 
humans and other higher 
organisms. DNA includes 
seperaied gene segments that 
contain information to build 
proteins. 
I 



Kevorkian to go on trial again 

A Michigan judge ordered 
suicide doctor Jack Kevorkian 
Monday to stand Uial for helping 
a 73 year-old m;ui to kill himself 
last month. 

It is the second time Kevorkian 
has been ordered to stand trial 
for ignoring the state's new 
suicide law since the measure 
was reinstated by the Michigan 
Court of Appeals in June. 
Kevorkian has attended 18 
suicides since 1990. 

FBI hara$.sment case 

An FBI agent who contends 
her career has been ruined 
because she pubhcly accused a 
superior of assault and sexual 
harassment, declared Monday 
that she is turning in her badge. 

Suzanne J. Doucette, 39^, said 
she was taking the ^tion 
because the FBI had placed her 
on unpaid leave. 

Doucette argued that she was 
the victim of retaliation because 
she made her allegations public 
in congressional testimooy. 



Kennedy wedding another 
spectacle 

Ihe bride was late, the gr(X)m 
couldn't wait to kiss her and 
camera- wielding journalists 
chased the guests across the 
church lawn. 

The spectacle was everything 
one would expect from a 
Kennedy wedding. 

Edward Kennedy Jr. and 
Katherine Anne Gershman were 
married on Sunday after 
Gershman kept Kennedy waiting 
at the alter for nearly 20 minutes. 
Kennedy met her half way down 
the aisle and gave her a kiss. 

He is the son of long-time 
Massachusetts senator Edward 
Kennedy. 



Officers in King beating begin 
jail time 

Two white police officers 
convicted in the videotaped 
beating of black motorist 
Rodney King reported to a 
federal prison Tuesday to begin 
serving their sentences, after 
receiving a two- week reprieve. 

Sergeant Stacey Koon and 
Officer Laurence Powell started 
their time in "Club Fed" as the 
minimum security facility in 
northern California is called. 
The U.S. Supreme Court refused 
to hear dieir pleas to remain free 
while appealing against their 
convictions. 

Officials of the U.S. Bureau of 

Prisons, mindful that disgraced 

police officers are loathed by the 

general prison population, 

recommended the men serve at 

the facility. 
1 



DESiGHinc mmos 



mmmmt^ 




Tanning Special Mf^ 

15 Sessions for $25%^ ^ 
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state 

Casey getting stronger 

Pennsylvania Governor Robert 
P. Ca.sey's recovery from a hcitft- 
liver transplant has been 
encouraging despite some recent 
set-backs, his heart specialist 
said Monday. 

The governor reportedly felt 
better Monday after antibiotics 
apparently countered a sudden 
bout of fever and chills late 
Saturday, according to the 
University of Pittsburgh Medical 
Center. 

Doctors believe Casey's fever 
was triggered by a blood 
infection caused by bacteria. 



Transplant patient critical 

A five year-old girl from 
l^ngland who underwent a rare 
transplant was back in the 
intermediate intensive care unit 
(ICU) at Pittsburgh's Children's 
Hospital Monday. 

Laura Davies, who had a seven 
organ transplant at the hospital 
Sept. 16, had been moved to a 
regular room, but was returned 
to the ICU after she developed 
breathing problems. 

Davies received a new liver, 
stomach, pancreas, small and 
large intestines and two kidneys 
in a 15 hour operation because 
organs she recieved in an earlier 
transplant in June of 1992 began 
to fail. <; 




courtesy of 

College Press Service 



Cash prizes to student Ideas i .College gets gift - tPO years,^ 



later 



'!■:> 






ilh 



Straight group supports gay 
rights 

The name says it all. Straight 
But Not Narrow is a group of 
heterosexual students who have 
banded together to support gay 
and lesbian rights and fight 
homophobia at the University of 
Houston. 

"There is no reason for 
homophobia," said John Cobb, 
president of the new 
organization. Cobb said his 
group wanted to emphasize that 
not all heterosexual people fear 
homosexuals. "It's simple. We're 
straight, but not narrow minded," 
said Maryelaine Eckerle, vice 
president of the group. 
"Everyone should have equal 
rights, and everyone should have 
the right to be who diey are." 

Mitchell Nicholas, executive 
administrator of the Gay, 
Lesbian and Bisexual Alliance, 
said his group supported the 
efforts of SBNN. 

"You don't have to be gay to 
come out in support of gay's and 
lesbians' equal rights," Nicholas 
said. "People are realizing that 
95 percent of our lives are like 
everyone else's." 

SBNN will be involved in the 
National Coming Out march and 
rally Oct. 11 and AIDS 
Awareness Week in November. 



A new national grant program 
dubbed "The Big Idea" offers 
students $2,000 grants for 
designing innovative service 
projects to batUe social problems 
in their campus communities. 

The program, sponsored by the 
Jostens Foundation in 
partnership with the Campus 
Outreach Opportunity League 
(COOL), announced the 
program, which will provide 
grants to ten students throughout 
the country, in September. 

The projects must reflect 
creativity and innovation and 
have the potential to be 
replicated on other campuses. 

"Further evidence of growing 
student concern over social 
issues can be found in the 
profusion of new student service 
organizations like COOL that 
have sprung up since the late 
1980s, as well as in a marked 
resurgence in established service 
programs," COOL said. 

UNM poets take verse to the 
streets 

A group of poets from the 
University of New Mexico gave 
readings of their work on the 
streets of Albuquerque last 
month in an effort to expo.se 
more people to poetry. 



Gettysburg college recently 
received die biggest single gift in 
its history, $3.5 million, from a 
trust fund established by an 1893 
graduate. 

Merle Stauffer Boyer's will 
stipulated that the college 
ultimately receive all proceeds 
from a trust fund established to 
benefit his two children, Kathryn 
and Donald, during their 
lifetimes. Boyer, a physician in 
Philadelphia, died in 1941. 

Kathryn died in 1979, and 
Donald died in 1993. They left 
no heirs. 

"What makes Uie Merie Boyer 
gift so special is that students 
who will make dieir mark on the 
21st century will have as their 
benefactor a graduate from 19di 
century," said college president 
Gordon Haaland. 

Students arrested in 
prostitution ring 

Three University of Arizona 
students were arrested for 
allegedly running a prostitution 
ring and employing college-age 
women. 

The arrests took place after 
police read an advertisement in 
The Arizona Daily Star 
promising a large selection of 
escorts and reasonaWe rates. 




ance. Somehow we compliment 
each other," comments Intraub. 

Rakeckas and Intraub have 
worked together on a regular 
basis for eleven years, synthesiz- 
ing the disciplines they studied, 
such as dieater, mime, dance and 
die martial arts. For seven years 
they rented studio space in 
Brooklyn and in the better- 
known spaces for avant-garde 
theater throughout New York 
City and around the world to 
work togedier full-time. 

Referring to performances and 



step. 

Rajeckas and Intraub's most 
recent work is "Full Moon Over 
Altoona," which the pair is reluc- 
tant to discuss with those who 
haven't seen it. Audience reac- 
tion is very important to diem. 

Tickets are going quickly, so 
please call soon. Tickets are $8 
for the public and $6 for stu- 
dents. Call (814) 437-3440 from 
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. , or visit the 
Barrow-Civic Theatre ticket 
booth 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 
Monday through Friday. 



o , o ■ , ...... University Relations photo 

Paul Rajeckas and Neil Intraub combine physical and verbal partnering to create a darkly 
comic mosaic. They piece together finely-timed movement with dialogue, soundtracks and 
music, creating a humorous and poignant theatre. 



Escape cold Clarion weather; study overseas in sun 



by Luis Almeida 
Contributing Writer 

Most Clarion University stu- 
dents are unaware that Uiey have 
die opportunity to study abroad 
at almost the exact expense of 
studying in Clarion. 

The International Student 
Exchange Program (ISEP) trades 
one student from the United 
States for one student from a 
host country, so Uiey literally 
trade expenses. Besides die dif- 
ference in expense of living, the 
airfare and a small placement 
fee, die cost of going to school 
would remain the same. 

One of die diree Clarion stu- 
dents to participate in the ISEP 



program last semester was 
Brandie Payne. Payne had taken 
eight years of Spanish before 
going to Mexico. Her main pur- 
pose for going was to become 
more fluent in diat language. 

Payne is majoring in both 
Spanish and marketing. She was 
enrolled in a university in 
Monterey, Mexico. The univer- 
sity was like a technical school 
where she took business courses. 
She felt that professors in 
Mexico expect a lot from Oieir 
students and diat homework was 
a daily fact of life. 

There were 30 odier American 
students at Payne's surrogate 
college, including Jennifer 



Johnson, anoUier Clarion student 
involved in the ISEP program. 
Johnson stated that she would 
usually find herself in a crowd 
with a mixture of both 
Americans and Mexicans. 
Friendships were made to the 
point where she spent Christmas 
and New Year's wiUi two differ- 
ent families. 

The third Clarion adventurer 
was Megan Stecklair, who is a 
German and Spanish major. She 
was placed in Eichstatt, 
Germany, but she is currently in 
Bavaria, about one hour nordi of 
Munich. The university she 
attended in Eichstatt had 3000 
students and die town was com- 



prised of one street. 

Stecklair spoke very highly of 
her ISEP experience. She said 
that she learned new ways of 
thinking and educating herself 
and diat people seemed to really 
enjoy learning in Germany and 
dedicated a lot to Uiat process. 

Germany was not the only 
country Stecklair visited. She 
also explored Poland, Austria 
and Czechoslovakia, and her 
family even joined her in March 
for a vacation. 

Stecklair encourages everyone 
to travel overseas. She reminds 
us diat one does not need a for- 
eign language because Uiere are 
possibiliUes of going to Ireland, 



Scotland, England or some odier 
English-speaking nation. She 
states diat diere was financial aid 
available and diat after buying 
the ticket it was like being in 
Clarion. 

Anyone who is interested in 
seeing new places should stop by 
the Office of International 
Programs at 212 Founders and 
ask about die ISEP program. 



Office of International 

Programs 

212 Founders 

Dr. Lepke 

226-2340 



i 



CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 



give blood so that 

Clarion's football team 

will have an extra 

supply." 

-Jim Leda 

President 

lUP Student Congress 



American Red Cross Bloodmobile 

Challenge 

CLARION vs lUP 

Monday, October 1 8th 

Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room 

1 1 AM - 5 PM 



> .^f- The winner of the Clarion-IUP Blood Drive 
^ "^ " : will have its flag flown over the losing 
TrTf TtTo) school's campus for a day. 




STUDENT SENATE 



)h periormance 
for adult minds only 

Actor Scott Keeley dazzles audience with magic 



by Hans Dovenspike 
Contributing Writer 



Scott Keely, 20 year veteran of 
stage, television, film, and radio 
will be performing a one-man 
show next Wednesday, entitled 
"The Devil You Say." The per- 
formance entails an evening of 
conversation with the devil him- 
self (or herself depending on 
your beliefs). 

Satan delivers his dialog while 



Comic Books 

Comics,cards 

Collector supplies 

Monday-Friday 

Noon-5:00 

Friday 
Noon-7:00 

(Open earlier by chance) 

Phone 227-2544 

Located on South 6th Ave. 
Across from the Loomis 



moving between stage and audi- 
ence. During this witty repartee, 
he attempts to dazzle the audi- 
ence with backfiring magic 
tricks. 

The performance uses excerpts 
from literary greats such as 
Dostoevsky, Twain, and 
Melville — along with the devil 
giving his version of the Bible. 

Amidst the humorous points of 
the performance, the audience 
will find out that beneath his 
facade, the devil is not someone 
to laugh at. 

Says Keely about the play, "In 
everything — every word, every 
image — there is a truth... and 
there is a lie. It is for you to 
decide which is which." 

"The Devil You Say" is rec- 
ommended for mature audiences 
only of adults, college and uni- 
versity and selected high school 
students. The play is sponsored 
by the Clarion University 
Activities Board Art Series. It is 
playing on Wednesday, October 
20 at 8 p.m. at Hart Chapel. 
"The Devil You Say" is free and 
open to tiie public. 





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Expand intellect at coffee house 



by Suzanne Hildebrandt 
Lifestyles Writer 

The retrospect of beatnik cof- 
fee houses comes alive in Oil 
City . For one to two nights a 
month, a portion of the newly 
renovated Barrow Civic Theatre 
complex hosts a quaint gathering 
of diverse artists and audience 
members. 

Sponsored by Professor Phillip 
Terman of the English depart- 
ment at Clarion's Venango cam- 
pus, and other volunteers, the 
coffee house opens its doors on 
select Saturdays throughout the 
year. 

For a nominal admission of $3 
for adults and $2 for students, 
children and senior citizens, you 
are open to enjoy musical perfor- 
mances, poetry readings, short 
skits and literary readings as well 
as collections of other fine arts. 

Beginning at 7 p.m., people are 
prompted to relish the atmos- 



phere by starting off with a 
relaxing cup of coffee, including 
the luxuriant tastes of expresso 
and cappuccino, and the delec- 
table morsels of fresh pastries. 

While engaging in this titilla- 
tion of this palate, you are also 
invited to admire the various 
pieces of artwork on display 
throughout the establishment. 

Then at 7:30 p.m. the enchant- 
ing "performing showcase" takes 
the spotlight as fresh artisans 
from theaters demonstrate and 
share their skills with the varied 
audiences whose ages range 
from 2 to 90. Participation as 
either performer or audience 
member provides for an expres- 
sive and entertaining evening. 

Presently there are only three 
more coffee house nights left in 
this year's season but they are 
looking for interested perform- 
ers, writers, artists and musicians 
as well as good-hearted volun- 



teers for next year's venue. 

All interested individuals 
please feel free to contact 
Professor Phillip Terman at 
(814) 676-9429 or Charlene 
Dicaligaro at (412) 794-3338. 

The headlines for the remain- 
der of this year's performances 
are as follows: October 25- 
Accustic guitarist Charlene 
Dicaligare, poet Norm Milliken, 
Clarion University flutist Kylie 
Anderson, and Clarion Univer- 
sity viohnist Janice Spangler. 

November 6-CUP guitarist 
Brent Register, CUP flutist Lisa 
Johnson, and accomplished 
writer Bill O'Driscoll of the In 
Pittsburgh magazine with the 
remainder of the night reserved 
for open stage. 

December 4-performers are yet 
to be announced but there will be 
two from the musical genre and 
two from the literary genre. 
Hope to see you there! 



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National 

Collegiate 

Alcohol 

Awareness Week 
October 18-21 



Don't ever drink and 
drive; have a friend take 
your keys, not your Ufe. 



Student Senate Time Capsule 

Dr. Diane Reinhard, President of CUP 

Gara Smitli» President of Student Senate, 

and Brian Hoover, Student Trustee 

will be dedicating the time capsule: 

Monday, October 18 at 1 p.m^ 

Outside Gemmell Student Complex 

by the Express shop 

Come be a part of Clarion University history. 



Scare yourself at the 
Jaycees haunted barn 



by Sherry Dickerson 
Lifestyles Writer 



Halloween is just around the 
comer. So if you're not afraid of 
ghosts and goblins, the haunted 
bam awaits you. It is sponsored 
by the Clarion Area Jaycees. 
The haunted bam is the Jaycees 
largest fund raiser of the year. 

The haunted bam will be open 
Thursday, October 14 thru 
Sunday, October 17th and every 
night from Wednesday, October 
20th thru October 31st from 7-10 
p.m. on weekdays and 7-1 1 p.m. 
on Fridays and Saturdays. 

The haunted bam is located at 
the Clarion County Park off of 
Route 66 (between Route 322 
and Exit 8 on 1-80). The admis- 
sion price is $2.50 for adults and 
$1.50 for children 12 years and 
under. 



The Jaycees are a leadership 
training organization that offers 
individual development through 
community service for people 
the ages of 21-39. If you are 
interested in joining, the Clarion 
Jaycees hold their membership 
meetings on the first and third 
Thursday of every month at the 
Holiday Inn. 

Wednesday, October 27th is 
Conununity Night. All proceeds 
benefit the Clarion County Red 
Cross. Your support will get you 
a scare. For advance tickets 
sales call (814) 797-5864. Any 
questions call Jan Walters 226- 
8041. Group rales are available. 



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^^B flu MB W ^^B BB BB W ^r* < 



Have a story for 
the lifestyles 
section of the 
Clarion Call? 



Just call Amy at 
226-2380. 



•r^^^^m^^f^'rm'r^'^^ 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



Page 13 



11 



\\ 



S 



f 



t h 




by Chuck Shepherd 



-A February issue of the 
Journal of the American Medical 
Association reported that a 23- 
year-old Israeli man required 
surgery to repair his small intes- 
tine after it ruptured following a 
toinpetition with his brother in 
which he ate 25 chili petters in 
12 minutes. Capsaicin, the burn- 
ing agent in chili peppers, had 
eaten through the intestine wall. 

j -Testifying in Conway, South 
Carolina, in April on behalf of 
her brother, who was ultimately 
convicted of criminal negligence 

^in the drowning death of a 
woman despite his being severe- 
ly intoxicated at the time, Janet 
Kolbasook told the court her 
brother was dear to her: "We're 



a tight family. We're all alco- 
holics." 

-In April, Edward R. Blagden, 
64, was brought before taxicab 
regulators in Fort Lauderdale, 
Florida on a customer's com- 
plaint that Blagden had locked 
him in the trunk of the taxi when 
he didn't pay the fare. Blagden 
ultimately lost his license, but 
not before he begged the hearing 
board: "I promise you, I won't 
put anybody in the trunk." 

-Ms. Adel Arnold, 49, the old- 
est of five woman who had been 
arrested in July 1992 for a top- 
free protest against Ontario nudi- 
ty laws that allow men to be 
shirtless but not women, won the 
case in February with her argu- 
ment that women's breasts are 
not necessarily objects of sexual 



desire: "They're hanging down 
to my waist. What's sexy about 
that?" 

-Convicted serial keller Henry 
Lee Lucas, imprisoned in 
Huntsville, Texas told an 
Associated Press reporter in July 
that he actually made up tales 
about his involvement in the 
nearly 600 murders he had con- 
fessed to. Lucas, who is now 
serving life sentences for 10 
murders, said that once he got 
started making up confessions, 
he couldn't stop: " I just didn't 
have any willpower." 

-A judge in Los Angeles sen- 
tenced Yu-te Chen, 27, of 
Taiwan to 30 days in jail in 
September after federal agents 
found 52 snakes illegally in his 
possession as he attempted to 



TV-5 joins United Way in fundraiser 



^v Sean Boileau 
lifestyles Writer 



Clarion University's own TV-5 
ijoined forces in an annual Walk- 
a-thon and 10 kilometer race 
with the United Way of Clarion 
County on October 3rd. 

{'Participants from the TV-5 staff 
included Karen Hazlett and 
Cassie Kaizer, who joined in the 
walk-a-thon. Station Manager 
Joe Rainey was awarded a tro- 
phy for placing third in his age 
.division for the lOK race. 
i TV-5 raised a total of $129 
through sponsors who agreed to 
pledge a certain amount for each 

' mile of the course, which 
totalled three miles. This 
amount was the largest amount 
raised by any participating stu- 
dent organization. Said Hazlett, 
"We are happy to have this tro- 
phy; but more than that, we are 
happy to have helped United 
Way. We would like to thank 
our sponsors who made this pos- 



sible." 

In addition to several other 
fundraisers, the lOK race and the 
Walk-A-Thon help to raise 
money for Clarion County's 
United Way and its eleven local 
member agencies: Southern 
Clarion County Organization for 
Parenthood Education, SAFE, 
Rape Crises Center, Parents 
Anonymous, Goodwill 

Industries, Girl Scouts, Boy 
Scouts, Foxview Manor, 



Clarion/Forest Visiting Nurse 
Association, Association for 
Retarded Citizens of Clarion 
County, and the American Red 
Cross. 

Highlights of the Walk-a-thon 
and race were aired during TV- 
5's live broadcast of the Autumn 
Leaf Parade, which will be re- 
aired the entire week of October 
lOth at 5:00 PM. 



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board a flight home from Los 
Angeles International Airport. 
Most were found in a carry-on 
bag, but 18 were strapped to his 
biceps and ankles. 

-Christopher Howard, 25, was 
arrested in Haines City, Florida 
in August after police responded 
to his call reporting that a bur- 
gler was trying to break into his 
house. When the officers 
arrived, Howard led them around 
the house looking for the alleged 
burgler, but apparently forgot 
that he had left on the dining 
room table a ceramic plate con- 
taining cocaine, which the offi- 
cers soon discovered. 

-In April, the Montana 
Legislature passed a harsh ani- 
mal-abuse law that increased the 
penalty for a second conviction 
to two years in prison and a 
$1,000 fine. The state's maxi- 
mum penalty for second-offense 
wife-beating is six months and 
$500. 

-A man whose identity was not 
disclosed in news accounts was 
arrested in April in Kissimmee, 
Florida and charged with misde- 
meanor lewdness after he tried to 
obtain the underwear of several 
police officers to add to his 400- 
item collection. Said a police 
detective, "This guy has a fetish 
for cops." Officers arrested him 
after they talked him into drop- 
ping by the station to chat. He 
was carrying samples of his col- 
lection along with videotapes of 
the TV show "Cops." 

-A 17 year-old boy was hospi- 



talized in Southington, Ohio, in 
March after he placed a .22 cal- 
iber bullet in a vise at his home 
and tightened it to see what 
would happen. It exploded, 
embedding metal fragments in 
his fingers. 

-Francis Perlmutter, who had 
inadvertently confessed to mur- 
der in St. Paul, Minnesota in 
June when he left a message on 
an answering machine, told 
reporters who were questioning 
him just after his arrest: "I don't 
know what's going to happen 
now. This is my first murder." 

-William K. Kessie, 42, was 
arrested in Cleveland in 
December and accused of mak- 
ing several telephone calls to 
women who work for churches 
in which he pretends to be a 
young girl who has been abduct- 
ed and raped and who is asking 
for their help. 

-In February, Wellington, New 
Zealand, police commander 
Murray Jackson told reporters 
that construction of a new police 
station and lockup would be 
delayed because the building 
would be subject to the new 
local safety code, which would 
require that prisoners have 
immediate access to exits in case 
of fire. According to Jackson, 
that would require furnishing 
ihem with keys. 



■(c)1993 Universal Press 
Syndicate 




9 Styles 
To Choose From 



Available at 

606 Main Steet Clarion, PA 

(814)226-8272 

Avatlahlr In many other cart 1 v,it Inj: stvlr^ and 
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*,.' > , •l»JO«o«emf G»«pocwi«f»AH lli(5>H» 









Page 14 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 






The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



Page 15 







Pagt 16 



■ I* w m w w » -^ 9 



The Glarioii Call: Thursday, Octc|ber J 4, 1993 



Entertainment 



THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 





"One more time: You were at the park, enjoying the 
afternoon, when you distinctly heard the defendant 
turn to his dog and say: Look, boy! A stickman!' " 



"In fact, you WkB to build fires, don't you, Mr. Pig? 

Building fires and burning wild animals a pastime 
of yours, Mr. Pig? Did you know my client is an 
endangered species, Mr. Pig, while you yourself 
are nothing more than a walking side of ham?" 




"Weil, the defendant and I had made this deal in which 

we both prospered.... One of those 'you-scratch-me- 

behind-my-ears-l'll-scratch-you-behind-yours' 

arrangements." 



cjo arcM^ ib the back of ihe 
bath carr/ing ih'S shovel «?^ ^^'s 
got -this Wild Jool(i^ his eyesdhJhr^ 
like real ner\^m £fi^ ihen 1 i^ic^ \ 
he'!> fr/'nofo b^r/ 1h'6 h^pl<Jii''ci^^ 
whlck af -first X f.yjirc :s jusffu/l oi" 
manure inf-fhen T slart to \Amcle>- 
wlnat #.<> h-ey is ^o'lnjr ot) an^ ^^^^^ 



Doonesbury 



BY GARRY TRUDEAU 




GOOP AFTBRNOON, eeHJimE^. 
I'M a COMMANP&l TRJPLaR, 
NAVY CHAPeWm FOR THIS 
1MR!e TAILWOK A^^m- 
WNCONVMTION... I 




mMBerneFB in thb imKa 

OFPOZBNaCFCUReCKBPCA- 

FB&ie mu RuiNBP Lms>. i 

P0N7HAVB 10 TBU. VQU HOUJ 
mPORJANTIT ^ 
ISTHATTHIS 

cotivemm 

OFPeCORUM! 





m/ARP IHAimP, IlAlliUB^ 
BRIBFIN6£ACH6QUAPI?0N,I?5- 
VimiNG WHAT ITA15AN5 TO 
CONPUCT yOUR5BLVB&fi&OP- 

Fic&?5 ANP emnmm! 

ANfQUBSimS. 
dS^FORBim 

meTARjBP? 



(ob^Aa^^ 




orni, peopi^, m'epsvim 

HOU/AN OFFICm ANP A 6FN- 
MMAN C0N9UCT5 HmeeiFAl 
A SOQAL FUNC- 
IION! you IN 



Mr. Ed spills his guts. 



:Cross\vord answers; 



NO MORK CHEATING!! 

The current week's 

crossword puzzle 

answers will 

now be appearing in the 

following week's 

paper. 

Sorry for any inconveniences 
lliis nia\ cause. 



A FmAia OFFI- 
1F^, CBK5WP50UT 
eiR? OFANFLBVATOR. 
\ UJHATPOYOUPO^ 



I'^SHB 

A BASF, 

SIR.? 



I 



AFFIRMA7IVF. 
HOUJPOYOU 
MAKBH5R 
AOQUAINI- 
ANC5^ 



UM...6RA3 
HFRFROM 
BBHINP^ 



WUHAVBN'T 
PONB JHB 
RBAPIN6, 

HAVB you, 

/ SAILORS 




The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



PagelT 



Entertainment 




ff THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
1 EngrosseC 
5 Bette or 

Jetterson 
10 Service Drancti 

abcr 

14 fJor.pafeii 

15 All in the 
Family' name 

16 Entreaty 

17 English queen 

18 — porridge 
not .. ' 

19 City in Georgia 

20 Direct 

22 Atomic particle 
24 Green nji 
27 Suave 
30 Sate places 

34 Damp 

35 Frighten 

36 Kmaieo 

37 No its. ands, 
or — 

38 Pay out 

39 in one s right 
mmo 

40 Dir letters 

41 Swoon 

42 ThicKheaced 

43 Closed again 

45 Easy to chew 

46 Stressful 
situations 

48 Kayaks 

51 Pudding variety 

55 — the Red 

56 Crazed 

59 High-fiDer tood 

60 Engrave 

61 Author Zola 

62 Fat 

63 Understands 

64 Backs ot necks 

65 Fitzgerald or 
Logan 




DOWN 

1 Certain horse 

2 — Domini 

3 Actor Sean 

4 Cross the line 

5 Oust 

6 Able 

7 By way ot 

8 Common 
contraction 

9 Animal tender 

10 Remove 

1 1 Narrow opening 

1 2 Office 
communication 

13 City m France 
21 Color 

23 tvlake angry 



25 Travels upward 

26 Sing a certain 
way 

27 Brown pigment 

28 Excite 

29 Takes the 
Palt 

31 Antelope 

32 Wash cycle 

33 Direct 

35 Undercover 
agents 

38 Departrtiem 
store 
employees 

39 Logical 

41 Charge tor 
tiding 

42 Profound 



44 Eras 

45 Vestiges 

47 Serviceable 

48 Letters 

49 Funny Johnson 

50 Pleasant 

52 Spoken f 

53 Sandburg or 
Sagan 

54 Time — nait 

57 I — Camera 

58 Small OrmK 



9.-" ,::i ■ 




...And at the Frankenstein Institute of 
Technology, as you learn to use each tool, 
it goes into your very own tool box!! 



Pagt 16 



The Clarion Call: Thursday. OctqberJ4, 1993 



Entertainment 



THE FAR SIDE 



By GARY LARSON 





"One more time: You were at the park, enjoying the 
afternoon, when you distinctly heard the defendant 
turn to his dog and say: 'Loolc, boy! A stickman!' " 



"In fact, you likeXo build fires, don't you, Mr. Pig? 

Building fires and burning wild animals a pastime 
of yours, Mr. Pig? Did you know my client is an 
endangered species, Mr. Pig, while you yourself 
are nothing more than a walking side of ham?" 




'Well, the defendant and I had made this deal in which 

we both prospered.... One of those 'you-scratch-me- 

behind-my-ears-ril-scratch-you-behind-yours' 

arrangements." 



f Cjo arourKi ib fhe back o-f ihe 
bcith carrfjiy ih's shovel ^^ ^^ 's 
^t this Wild iook'r^ his e^eiahclhri^ 

l:Ke real r\ervm ar^ i^eh 1 i^fice ^^ 
hie's fr/in^ to k/r/ Pi'6 h^ plait,- c Ioq^ 
]AMkk ai {mtX-f.jur^ ;5jus^7w//o/^ 

iy)anure ii^tihen T sBirt toiAcnc/er 




Doonesbury 



BY GARRY TRUDEAU 



600P AF7BRN00N, 6BNTLm3N. 
I'M a COMMANP&?. mPLBR, 
mw ChAPBWm FOR THIS 
VMR'5 TAILWOK A^SOm- 
WNC0NV5NWN... / 




mMB^HBRB IN 7HB mKa 

OFPOZBNSCFUJRBacBPCA- 

FB5RemPRUlNB-PLm5. 1 

PONI'HAV^ TO TBLL VOU HOUJ 

mPORJAKTIJ 

16 THAT THIS 

CONVENTION 

Be^JHEMOPBL 

OFpeCORUM! 



OKAY, PBOPLB, L3J'^R3Vim 
MOM AN OFFlCm ANQA OBN- 
MMAN CONWCTa HIMeOFAJ 
A eOQAL FUNC- 
TION! WUIN 



Mr. Ed spills his guts. 



iCrossvvord answers; 



NO MORK CHEATING!! 

The current week's 

crossword puzzle 

answers will 

now be appearing in the 

following week's 

paper. 

Sorry for any inconveniences 
this nuiN cause. 





SIR? 

\ 



A FmALB OFFI- 
CBR5TEP50UT 
OFANBtaVATOR. 
UJHATPOYOUPO^ 




IS5HB 

A BABB, 

SIR? 



AFFIRMAJIVB 
HOUJ PO YOU 
MAKBH5R 
ACQUAINT- 
ANCe^^ 



UM...6FA3 
HBRFROM 
BFHINP? 



WUHAVBN'T 
PONB THB 
FSAPIN6, 
HAVB YOU, 
/ SAILORS 



ADMIRAL? TRIPLBR 
HBFB, 5IR. JU5T 
aiBCJ<JN6lN,5IRi 




HOU/P TUB 
mBBINO 
60,00^- 
MANPBR^ 



iajbu, sir, 

CONeiPBRJNO 
Ue'RBPBAUNO 
mHTHBB60a 
0BAVIA10R5... 

./ 





60OP 

IMORK, 
IRJP- 
LBRI 



THANK YOU, 

SIR. aw 

ICOULP 
MAKBA 
PIB... \ 



m 

COMBf?i 




The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



PagelT 



Entertainment 



Creature Feature 




fr THE Crossword 



ACROSS 
1 Engrossec 
5 Belle or 
Jetterson 
10 Service Drancn 
aDDr 

14 Nonpareil 

15 "All in the 
Family' name 

16 Entreaty 
7 English queen 

18 — porridge 
hot . ■ 

19 City in Georgia 

20 Direct 

22 Atomic particie 
24 Green nut 
27 Suave 
30 Sate places 

34 Damp 

35 Frighten 

36 Kindled 

37 No Its, ands. 
or — 

38 Pay out 

39 In one s right 
mind 

40 Dir letters 

41 Swoon 

42 Thickheaoed 

43 Closed again 

45 Easy to chew 

46 Stressful 
situations 

48 Kayaks 

51 Pudding variety 

55 — the Red 

56 Crazed 

59 High-fiDer food 

60 Engrave 

61 Author Zola 

62 Fat 

63 Understands 

64 Backs ot necks 

65 Fitzgerald or 
Logan 




w 



Calvm anil 






DOWN 

1 Certain horse 

2 — Domini 

3 Actor Sean 

4 Cross the line 

5 Oust 

6 Able 

7 By way ot 

8 Common 
contraction 

9 Animal tender 

10 Remove 

1 1 Narrow opening 

12 Office 
communication 

13 City m France 
21 Color 

23 Make angry 



25 Travels upward 

26 Sing a certain 
way 

27 Brown pigment 

28 Excite 

29 Takes the 
bait 

31 Antelope 

32 Wash cycle 

33 Direct 

36 Undercover 
agents 

38 Depanrhent 
store 
employees 

39 Logical 

41 Charge tor 
tiding 

42 Profound 



44 Eras 

45 Vestiges 

47 Serviceable 

48 Letters 

49 Funny Johnson 

50 Pleasant 

52 Spoken ^ 

53 Sandburg or 
Sagan 

54 Time — half 
57 I — Camera 
56 Small dnriK 



by Bill Watfrerson 



SF 




...And at the Frankenstein Institute of 
Technology, as you learn to use each tool, 
it goes into your very own tool box!! 



Page 18 



Ihe Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



Cable Channels 



THUm ,^OAY EVENING OCTOBER 14, 1993 




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2 30) *»»'; Abs&iceof Malice jm)] 



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6 Empty Nest 



8 



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14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



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I Cheers^ 



Les Brown 



Cops I 



Tiny Toon 



Cur, Affair 



(3 00) The Black Windmill ' 



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Pyramid [Pyramid 



*** 



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News: 



Coach i 



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Geraldo Sibling rivalry. (R) 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Animaniacs [Batman q 



Newsg 



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."jL. 



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ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



News : 



Full House q 



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The House on Skull Mountain (1974) 



Challenge Max Out 



Parker Lewis Facts of Life 



Say Anything ,. (1989) John Cusack. PG-13' q 



**V2 'Woman Times Seven' {1%7) 



Crazy Kids [Hey Dude (RllGuts 



Impulse i^%4, Suspense) Tim Matheson. 



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NBC News 



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Jeopardy! : 



Copsg 



CBS News 



Roseanne Q 



Jeopardy! g 



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*** 



"Hot Shots' (1991) Charlie Sheen. 



Ent. Tonight 



Straight Talk 



Married... 



Am.Joumal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



*** 



Up Close 



m//otv''(1988, Fantasy) Val Kilmer 



Missing Persons (In Stereo) 



Mad- You [Wings g 



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9:30 



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Major League Baseball Playoffs: NLCS Game 7 Braves at Phillies 



Simpsons g TSinbad g 



Mad- You Wings g 



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Ninja Turtles 



Sportscenter 



Major Dad g 



Kickoff 



PG' (Violence) [Short Sub. 



Wings g 



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-; foof/oose" (1984, Drama) Kevin Bacon. PC' g 



'Perry Mason. The Case of the Maligned Mobster' 



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Supermarket 



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Shop-Drop 



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Unsolved Mysteries 



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Seinfeld g [Frasier g 



Mama 



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Edition 



Chevy Chase 



**V2 "International Velvet {WB, Drama) Tatum O'Neal PG 



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Figure Skating: Professional Masters. iWhitbread [Oshkosh Fly-In 
Murder,~She Wrote q |**V; ■ladykiiler'- (1992, Suspense) Mimi Rogers, q 



**V2 'i Don't Buy Kisses Anymore " {^%2) PG' 



• •* 



'Ghostbusters' (1984, Comedy) Bill Murray. 'PG' 



Partridge [Get Smart 



L.A. Law 



Dragnet 



Bob Newhart 



Cape Horn 



Major Dad g 



*'/; 'Confessions of a Serial Killer" (1992) 



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M.T. Moore M.T. Moore 



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Van Dyke 



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Late Show g 



Love Con- 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



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Sportscenter 



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"Night and the City" {m2) 



Goldie Hawn 



Lucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



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A. Hitchcock 



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FRIDAY EVENING OCTOBER 15. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(2:30) 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



♦* 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



Worth Winning" (^%9] Mark Harmon. 'PG-13 



Empty Nest [Cheers g 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry 



Copsg 



Tiny Toon 



Cur. Affair 



(3:00)*** "W//oiv'(198a) 



Max Out 



Pyramid 



Dream Lg. 



Pyramid 



Newsg 



Coach q 



Newsg 



News 



GerakJo 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Animaniacs [Batman q 



Newsg 



Newsq 



News 



News 



6:30 



Sports Quiz 



ABC News 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsg 



Full House g 



Newsg 



Roseanne g 



NBC News 



**V2 "'Fathom " (\%1 , Adventure) Tony Franclosa. 



Challenge 



Parker Lewis 



Max Out (R) 



Facts of Life 



Motoworld 



Ninja Turtles 



**'/; "'Funny Lady ' (W^, Musical) Barbra Streisand, Omar Sharif PG 



*• 



"Iron Eagle (\%^) Louis Gossett Jr PG-13 



Up Close 



Ninja Turtles 



7:00 



7:30 



Inside the NFL (In Stereo) 



Hard Copy g 



Jeopardyl g 



Copsg 



CBS News 



Roseanne q 



Jeopardyl g 



Ent. Tonight 



Wh. Fortune 



Married... 



Am.Joumal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



*** 



Max Dugan Returns ' 



Sportscenter 



Major Dad q 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



** 



Family 



Piz/aA^an "(1991) Bill Maher 



jBoy-Worid 



Against the Grain q 



It Had to Be 



It Had to Be 



Album 



Album 



Brisco County. Jr. 



Against the Grain q 



1983) Jason Robards. PG' 



Step by Step 



9:30 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



**• "G/?os/fet/stefs" (1984, Comedy) Bill Murray. PG' g 



Mr. Cooper [20/20 q 



Secrets of Lake Success One Less Secret (In Stereo) 



'The Man From Left Field" (1993) Burt Reynolds, g 



"The Man From Left Field' {:%3] Burt Reynolds, q 



Baseball Relief 



Mama 



Mama 



Secrets of Lake Success "One Less Secret" (In Stereo) 



** "Every Time We Say Goodbye' (1986) Tom Hanks 



Muppets I Crazy Kids [Hey Dude (R)| Guts 



**'2 



Reckless Disregard' (1985, Drama) Tess Harper 



*** 



"Desire and Hell at Sunset Motel" (1 992) 



What You Do 



That's Z.//e (1986, Drama) Jack Lemmon. 'PG-13' 



Supermarket 



Looney 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



Bull winkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



W. Series 



NHL Hockey: Detroit Red Wings at Toronto Maple Leafs. From Maple Leaf Gardens. 

Wings q [Murder, She Wrote q \*y2 'Smokey and the Bandit 3" (1983) Jackie Gleason. 



**'/2 "A^/sfrgss"(1992) Robert Wuhl. (In Stereo) R' q 



***V2 Terminator 2: Judgment Day' (\^^^) 'R' q 



Partridge [Get Smart 



L.A. Law 



Dragnet 



iBpb Newhart 



**V2 "Unlawful Entry " (\%2) Kurt Russell. 'R' q 



More-Meets 



M.T. Moore 



Newsq 



News 



News 



Newsq 



11:30 



Sanders 



Cheers q 



12:00 



Comedy Jam 



Nightline q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In Stereo) g 



Edition 



Chevy Chaae Ted Danson. 



Late Show g 



Love Con. 



News q [Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



•** 'T/ieflmflfCft/r-fl" (1989) 'PG-13 



Horse Rac 



Sportscenter j Rodeo 



"Recruits" (1986) Steve Osmond 



*y2 "Bloodfist III: Forced to Fight" (1991) 



*** 



M.T. Moore [Van Dyke 



"Dominick and Eugene" (1988, Drama) Tom Hulce, Ray Liotta. 



Lucy Show 



"Masguerd." 



"Silencer" 



A. Hitchcock 



Unsolved Mysteries 



SATURDAY EVENING OCTOBER 16. 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



(3:00) 



4:30 



5:00 



5:30 



** 



"/■/S3 (1990) StacI Keanan. 'PG-13 



College Football: Regional Coverage 



6:00 



6:30 



*** 



"Defending Your Life' 



Golf: Skills [Belmont Breeders' Cup Special (Live; 



To Be Announced 



Freeland 



Box Office 



(3.00) More-Graffiti 



Cycling: Tour de France 



Cycling: Tour de France. 



Baywatch "Sky Rider " q 



Golf: Skills [Belmont Breeders' Cup Special (Live 



News 



News 



Newsq 



NBC News 



CBS News 



CBS News 



Star Trek: Next Gener. 



Newsq 



NBC News 



7:00 



7:30 



1991) Albert Brooks, PG' q 



News 



Night Court 



Court TV 



Wh. Fortune 



Untouchables Railroaded 



Crusaders 



Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



Jeopardy! q [Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



*** 



"Singles " {^%2, Comedy) Bridget Fonda. 'PG-13" q 



**** 



When Harry Met Sally" (1989) Billy Crystal, q 



Mommies g jCafeAme. [Empty Nest [Nurses q 



10:00 



Dream On q 



10:30 



Crypt Tales 



Commish (In Stereo) q 



Worid Series: Game 1 . Braves or Phillies at White Sox or Blue Jays 



Sisters (In Stereo) q 



Worid Series: Game 1. Braves or Phillies at White Sox or Blue Jays 



Copsq 



Mommies q 



Cop* (R) g 



Cafe Ame. 



(3:30) •** "The Big Picture" (1989) |***V2 "The Right Stuff" (1983, Drama) An account of the training of America's first astronauts. "PG" 



College Football: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



**V2 'Linda (1993, Suspense) Virginia Madsen. q 



(3:00) 



*♦ 



'2 Prelude to a Kiss' (^2) 'PG-13' q 



*♦ 



Loverboy' {\%9) Patrick Dempsey 



Can't on TV Arcade 



(3:00) 'Original Sin' (\%%) 



Double Dare 



Major Dad q [Wings g 



Front Page (Iri Stereo) g 



Empty Nest [Nurses g 



Comic Strip Live (In Stereo) 



*** 



Sisters (In Stereo) g 



Football [College Foottiall: Teams to Be Announced. (Live) 



"Enter Laughing" (1967, Comedy) Jose Ferrer. 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



••Vz "Traces Of Red " (W2 Mystery) R 



News g 



News 



News 



Newsg 



Golden Girts 



Empty Nest 



Saturday Night Live (R) 



Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



Untouchables 'Railroaded 



Afsenio Hall (In Stereo) g [Music 



News g [Saturday Night Live (R) 



Case Closed q 



**'--2 "My Blue Heaven {)9%) Steve Martin. PG-13' q 



**V2 ""Career Opportunities" {1%\) q 



Wild Side Salute 



Legends 



[Football Scoreboard 



**V2 "L/setfCars "(1980) Kurt Russell. R" 



** 



"Big Top Pee->vee (1988) Pee-wee Herman. 



** 



** 



Doug 



"The Karate Kid Part ///"" (1989) Ralph Macchio. PG 



"Iron Eagle" (1986) Louis Gossett Jr.. 'PG-13' q 



Rugrats 



"Out on a Limb" (1987) Actress Shirley MacLaine engages in a spiritual adventure. 



Clarissa 



Roundhouse 



Silk Stalkings "Wild Card" 



Sportscenter [Drag Racing 



•• 



"Sweet Justice" (1992) Marc Singer. "R 



'State Park" (1988) Kim Myers. 



***V2 "Basic Instinct" (1992) Michael Douglas. R' q \*V2 "Ring of Fire" (1991 , Drama) "R" 



Ren-Stimpy [You Afraid? 



**V2 "Out on a Z./md "(1987, Drama) Shirley MacLaine. 



** 



"Kill Cruise " imO) R' 



Very Very Nick at Nite 



Healthy Challenge 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Superman 



China Beach 



SUNDAY EVENING OCTOBER 17, 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25 



26 



4:00 



4:30 



5:00 



(2:30) 



5:30 



6:00 



** 



Golf: Chrysler American Great 18. q 



"Collision Course "(^W, Comedy) Jay Leno. PG' q 



[News q 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



** "Airplane II: The Segue/ "(1982) PG' 



ABC News 



NFL Football: Kansas City Chiefs at San Dtego Chargers. (Live) 



NFL Football: San Francisco 49ers at Dallas Cowboys. From Texas Stadium. (Live) g 



Braun 



Home Again [ Living 



"A Fine i^ess (1986, Comedy) Ted Danson. 



Star Search (In Stereo) [News 



NFL Football: Kansas City Chiefs at San Diego Chargers. 



[Star Trek: Deep Space 9 



••* 



"Guns afflaras/' (1964) Richard Attenborough. 



Horse Racing 



(3:00) Fast Times' 



Worid Cup USA 



Ten of Us Two Dads 



'/2 "Radio Flyer ■(^%2, Drama) Elijah Wood. 'PG-13' 



(3:25) Once Upon' 



Can't on TV Arcade 



Ready or Not Chris Cross 



Double Dare 



Freshmen 



*** 



The Ryan White Story" (1988, Drama) Judith Light. 



(Live) 



Short Sub. 



Softball 



Major Dad q [Wings g 



Videos 



Am. Funniest 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) g 



60 Minutes (In Stereo) g 



Townsend Television g 



I Witness Video (In Stereo) 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



Wind"{^%2, Adventure) Matthew Modine "PG-13' 



Lois & Clark-Superman 



Seaquest DSV (In Stereo) 



10:00 



10:30 



11:00 



Comedy Hour: George Carlin 



•** 



"Pretty Woman" {^990, Comedy) Richard Gere. (In Stereo) q 



"Message From Nam' (1993, Drama) Jenny Robertson. 



Worid Series: Game 2. Braves or Phillies at White Sox or Blue Jays 



Worid Series: Game 2. Braves or Phillies at White Sox or Blue Jays 



Martin q [Living Single Married... [Dearest [Star Trek: Next Gener. 



Seaquest DSV (In Stereo) 



*** 



Gorillas in the Mist"{\S8B, Drama) Sigourney Weaver. PG-13' 



Drag Racing NFL Primetime 



Billiards Challenge 



h "Necessary Roughness'" {^99^) Scott Bakula. q 



•*V2 "Ladykiiler"" ()992, Suspense) Mimi Rogers, g 



*** "Ghostbusters" {^9BA, Comedy) Bill Murray. 'PG 



Rocko's Life [Legends [You Afraid? [Roundhouse 



Spenser Ceremony" C\993, Mystery) Robert Urich. 



"Message From A/am "(1993, Drama) Jenny Robertson. 



*•* 



Shampoo" [Wb, Comedy) Warren Beatty. R' 



Supertwuts: Ali vs. Chuvalo 



Case Closed (R) q 



** "Man rrot/^/e' (1992) Jack Nicholson. "PG-13" g 



••• ""Star Trek III: The Search tor Spoc/c (1984) 'PG' q 



Nick News mork 



[Lucy Show [Van Dyke 



*** 



"Unspeakable Acts 09%, Drama) Jill Clayburgh. 



Drag Racing: NHRA 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) q 



***V2 "The Road Warrior" (■\9B'\] "R 



Tim Allen 



M.T. Moore Bob Newhart 



News 



News 



Newsg 



Paid Prog. 



News 



11:30 



12:00 



""77;e Last of the Mohicans' 



Newsq 



Cheers g 



Sttkel 



Wealth 



Paid Prog. 



Rescue 911 



Cheers g 



Night Court 



Murphy B. 



Lifestyles 



TBA 



Suspect 



••V2 "r/?e/?etvartf"" (1965, Drama) 



Sportscenter 



Silk Stalkings "Wild Card"' [Hollywood 



NFL 



*** 



**V2 "Defenseless" (^99^, Suspense) R 



'Coming to America" 



Thirtysomething 



Dragnet 



Paid Prog. 



A. Hitchcock 



Paid Prog. 



"Deadly S. 



Supennan 



Paid Prog. 



MONDAY EVENING OCTOBER 18, 1993 



10 



11 



14 



17 



18 



21 



22 



25^ 



4:00 



4:30 



(3:00) Chris. Col' 



Donahue (In Stereo) q 



Empty Nest [Cheers q 



Oprah Winfrey q 



Les Brown 



Tom-Jerry Tiny Toon 



Cops g 



Cur. Affair 



5:00 



Hot Shots 



Newsg 



Coach g 



5:30 



Sports Quiz 



Newsg 



News 



Geraldo Marital infidelity. 



Oprah Winfrey g 



Animaniacs [Batman^ 



Newsq 



(3:00) *** "Gorillas in the Mist" (1988) 



Max Out (R) 



Pyramid 



(2:30) 



Dream Lg. 



Pyramid 



Challenge 



Parker Lewis 



6:00 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



*** 



Newsq 



Time After Time" (1979) Malcolm McDowell. 'PG" 



News 



News 



ABC Newd 



NBC News 



CBS News 



Newsq 



FuU House g Roseanne g 



Newsg 



NBC News 



**V2 "The Reward' (^9%b, Drama) 



Max Out 



Facts of Life 



*** 



Guilty by Suspicion" (1991) 'PG-13' 



Muppets [Crazy Kids 



Th'breds 



Ninja Turtles 



W. Series 



Ninja Turtles 



Hard Copy g Ent. Tonight 



Jeopardy! g 



Cops g 



CBS News 



Roseanne g 



Jeopardyl g 



Wh. Fortune 



Manied... 



Am.Journal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



9:00 



9:30 



••* "Dead Bang " (^989, Suspense) Don Johnson. R g 



Day One g 



Fresh Prince 



Shade 



Shade 



Blossom g 



Dave's 



Dave's 



10:00 



10:30 



Tracey Ullman: New Yori( 



11:00 



11:30 



12:00 



•**V2 "The Waterdance" (W2] "R" g 



NFL Football: Los Angeles Raiders at Denver Broncos. From Mile High Stadium, g [News q 



"Moment of Truth: Stalking flac/r "(1993) Shanna Reed 



Murphy B. 



Murphy B. 



Love & War 



Love & War 



**'/; "Jersey Girl" i^ 992, Comedy-Drama) Jami Gert;. q 



Fresh Prince Blossom q 



•* ""7"ess of the Storm Country " {]960) Diane Baker. 



Sportscenter 



Major Dad q 



NFL Prime Monday 



Wings q 



(3:30) "The Fortune"' (Wi) *** "The Purple Rose of Cairo" {^98^) 



•** ""The Big Picture" (1989) Kevin Bacon. 'PG-13' q 



Hey Dude (R) [Guts 



""An Early Frost'C\965: Drama) Aidan Quinn. 



What You Do 



Supermaricet 



** 



Looney 



"In Between {] 992) Alexandra Paul. 



Shop-Drop 



Looney 



Bullwinkle 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Murder, She Wrote q 



Eye to Eye (In Stereo) q 



Eye to Eye (Iri Stereo) q 



Mama 



Mama 



"Moment of Truth: Stalking Back" (1993) Shanna Reed. 



News 



News 



Newsq 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In Stereo) g 



Edition 



Chevy Chaae Don Rickles 



•••V2 "Splendor in the Grass "{^9e^, Drama) Natalie Wood 



Newsq 



Expedition Earth 



WWF: Monday Night Raw 



*** 



"White Men Can"tJump" (1992) Woody Harrelson 



*'/2 "American Samurai" (\992) R' 



You Watch? Get Smart 



L.A. Law 



Dragnet 



Amazing Games 



Silk Stalkings (In Stereo) q 



W. Series 



Major Dad q 



** 



""Ring of Fire II: Blood and Steel" (1992) 



"Universal Soldier (1992) Jean-Claude Van Damme. 



Bob Newhart M.T. Moore IM.T. Moore 



*• 



"Notorious" {)992, Suspense) John Shea. 



Van Dyke 



Late Show q 



Love Con. 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



And Justice for All" ?\' 



Sportscenter 



Wings g [Odd Couple 



**'/2 Blue Desert" jm^) 



"Aces: Iron Eagle III" (1992) 



Lucy Show 



Unsolved Mysteries 



Hitchcock 



Mysteries 



TUESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 19. 1993 j 




4:00 [ 4:30 [ 5:00 [ 5:30 


6:00 1 6:30 [ 7:00 | 7:30 


8:00 [ 8:30 [ 9:00 


9:30 [ 10:00 10:30 11:00 


11:30 1 12:00 


2 


*** "Seems Like Old Times' (1980) Goldie Hawn. PG' 


*** "Ghostbusters ' 0984, Comedy) Bill Murray. "PG" g 


*** ""S/>)C7/es""(1992) Bridget Fonda g 


1 Am a Promise: Children of Stanton Elementary 


*** "Under Siege" 0992) 


4 


Donahue (In Stereo) g 


Newsq 


Newsg 


Newsg 


ABC News 


Hard Copy g 


Ent. Tonight 


Full House g 


Phenom g 


Roseanne q 


Coach (R)q [NYPDBIueq 


Newsq 


Cheers g [Nightline q 


6 


Empty Nest Cheers g 


Coach q 


News 


News 


NBC News 


Jeopardyl g 


Wh. Fortune 


Saved-Bell 


Getting By g 


"Message From Nam" 0993, Drama) Jenny Robertson. 


News 


Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 


7 


Oprah Winfrey q 


Geraldo 


News 


CBS News 


Copsg 


Married... 


Worid Series: Game 3 White Sox or Blue Jays at Braves or Phillies 


News 


Late Show (In Stereo) q 


8 


Les Brown 


Oprah Winfrey q 


Newsg 


CBS News 


Am.Joumal 


Worid Series: Game 3. White Sox or Blue Jays at Braves or Phillies 


Newsq 


Edition 


Late Show q 1 


10 


Tom-Jerry Tiny Toon 


Animaniacs {Batman q 


Full House g 


Roseanne g 


Roseanne g 


Married... 


Roc (R) g 


Bakersfield 


America's Most Wanted q [Mama [Mama 


Chevy Chase (In Stereo) q 


Love Con. | 


11 


Cops g Cur. Affair 


Newsg 


Newsg 


NBC News 


Jeopardy! g 


Wh. Fortune 


Saved-Bell 


Getting By g 


"Message From Nam" 0993, Drama) Jenny Robertson. 


Newsq 


Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 1 


14 


(3 00) *** "Ghostbusters 


"Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973) 


*** "H/ar/oc/c' (1959, Western) Richard Widmark. 


Short Sub. 


*** "Pete n' Tillie" 0972) Carol Burnett. PG" 


** "/Werf/ca/Story" (1975) Beau Bridges. 1 


17 


Max Out (R) 


Dream Lg. 


Challenge 


Max Out 


NBA Today 


Up Close 


Sportscenter 


NHL Hockey: Pittsburgh Penguins at New York Islanders, From the Nassau Coliseum. [Sportsnight 


Sportscenter 


18 


Pyramid 


Pyramid 


Part<er Lewis 


Facts of Life 


Ninja Turtles 


Ninja Turtles 


Major Dad g 


Wings g 


Murder, She Wrote g |**"2 "Web of Deceit (1990, Drama) Linda Purl g 


Major Dad q 


Wings q [Odd Couple 


21 


(2:00) 


♦*V2 "Babe" 


1975) Susan Clark. 


** "Nickels Dime 0992) C. Thomas Howell, PG 


"Desire and Hell at Sunset Motel' 0992) *** "The Last Boy Scout 


1991) "Rq 


** "Boomerang" (1992) Eddie Murphy, q 1 


22 


(3 35) ***'2 "Night of the Hunter (\9bb) 


To Die, To Sleep 0992. Drama) NR' 


*** "City Slickers' 099^) Billy Crystal. 'PG-13 


**V2 "Psycho IV: The Beginning " 0990) 


Fatality 


Red Shoe 


** "Night Eyes 2" 099^ 1 


25 


Muppets 


Crazy Kids 


Hey Dude (R) 


Guts 


What You Do Looney 


Looney 


Bullwinkle 


Partridge [Get Smart 


Dragnet Bob Newhart M.T. Moore 


M.T. Moore 


Van Dyke 


Lucy Show 


Hitchcock 


26 


*« Killer Instinct {:986. Drama) Melissa Gilbert. 


Supermaritet 


Shop-Drop 


Unsolved Mysteries 


Healthy Challenge 


"Lady in the Corner 0989, Drama) Loretta Young. 


Unsolved Mysteries 


Mysteries 



WEDNESDAY EVENING OCTOBER 20. 1993 



4:00 



4:30 



2 (3 30)*'? Defense Play" 



7 



Do nahue (In Stereo) q 



Empty Nest j Cheers : 



Oprah Winfrey :; 



8 : Les Brown 



10 Tom-Jerry Tiny Toon 



11 Cops: 



14 (2 30j 



Cur. Affair 



5:00 



5:30 



6:00 



News; 



Operation Lookout 099)) PG-13 



Coach : 



Newsq 



News 



Geraldo Shoplifting. (R) 



Oprah Winfrey 



Animaniacs Batman: 



News : 



Newsq 



News 



News 



6:30 



7:00 



7:30 



** 



Pizza Man 099:) BiW Maher 



ABC News Hard Copy q Ent. Tonight 



NBC News 



CBS News 



News : 



Full House :; Roseanne : 



News : 



Jeopardy! 



Cops 



CBS News 



Roseanne : 



Pete " Tiilie (1972) Carol Burnett PG 



NBC News [Jeopardy! 



Wh. Fortune 



Married. 



Am.Journal 



Married.. 



Wh. Fortune 



8:00 



8:30 



**V2 "Storyville (1992. Suspense) James Spader R' q 



Thea 



htL 



[Joe's Life q 



9:00 



9:30 



Home Imp [Grace Under 



Unsolved Mysteries q [Now-T. Brokaw & K. Couric [Law t Order Black Tie q 
World Series: Game 4 White Sox or Blue Jays at Braves or Phillies 



10:00 



Crypt Tales 



10:30 



Sanders 



Moon Over Miami q 



Worid Series: Game 4 White Sox or Blue Jays at Braves or Phillies 



Beverly Hills, 90210 q 



Unsolved Mysteries q 



Melrose Place (In Stereo) q Mama 



Mama 



■♦♦'2 



17 j MaxOutiRi , Dream Lg i Challenge Max Out 



18 . Pyramid 

"2r~[!2 30) 
22 '••♦ - 



j Pyramid 



Parker Lewis Facts of Life 



:♦♦ 



Fugitive Family (1980. Drama.l 



' InternaPcnal Velvet (1978 Drama) Tatum O'Neal PC 



Insid e PG A : Up Close Sportscenter PBA Bowling 



Ninia Turtles jNinia Turtles jMaior Dad q [Wings 



----. Bil' Murray PG i 



Say Ar^ything (1989) John Cusack PG-13 



** 



(1991) PG 



[Ston es 



Rochester Open (Live) 



Murde r, She Wrote q 



Now-T. Brokaw > K. Couric jLaw t Order Black Tie 



**'2 l/ff/e/Uurders (1971, Comedy) Elliott Gould PG 



Boxing: Iran Barkley vs Adolpho Washington (Live) 



♦ ♦'2 



♦ ♦* 



Toto the Hero (1991) PG-13 



Pef SemafarK (1989. Horror) Dale Midkiff 



11:00 



Dream On q 



Newsq 



News 



News 



News q 



Chevy Chase 



11:30 



12:00 



•*** Platoon " 0988) R 



Cheers q [Nightline q 



Tonight Show (In Stereo) q 



Late Show (In Stereo) q 



Edition 



News : 



In Stereo) ; 



Late Show q 



Love Con. 



[Tonight Show (In Stereo) : 



*** 



The Kremlin Letter (1970) PG 



Speedweek Sportscenter Volleyball 



**V2 "The Lover 0992. Drama) Jane March, R' 



Major Dad q Wings 



[Odd Couple 



The Gnfters 0990) R 



**'2 Gladiator (1992 Drama) Cuba Gooding Jr,. R q j** Miraae Beach (1992) Ami Do'enz [♦ Bikmi Summer 2 (19921 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



Page 19 



Sports 



HEY. WILUE! 



ALF "leafs" Huskies mushing in defeat, 40-18 



by Ben Vessa 
Sports Editor 



Just as it left Melmac, ALF 
departed from Clarion with a 
bang. After giving up two quick 
scores to Bloomsburg, the 
Clarion Golden Eagles exploded 
for 40 unanswered points and 
after a great week of food and 
fun, proved that they could have 
their cat and eat it too. 

Bloomsburg darted ahead early 
in quarter number one. After an 



put Bloomsburg up by 12 with 
only eight minutes gone by. 

Clarion began to move the ball 
late in the first, but a 12 play 
drive stalled at the BU 20 and 
Paul Cramer's field goal attempt 
sailed wide. 

Clarion got the ball back after 
a Bloomsburg fumble and Craig 
Ray went to work. First he 
found Kevin Harper on a third 
and nine play , then he spotted 
Marlon Worthy in the end zone 



Kamara interception placed 
Clarion at the Bloomsburg 28. 
Another third down pass from 
Ray to Harper, this one good for 
26, capped off the drive. 

Ray hit Tim Brown on another 
third and long situation on 
Clarion's next possession. That 
23 yard pick-up set up an eight 
yard Henry touchdown and a 26- 
12 lead. 

Ries fumbled the snap on the 
Huskies next possession and the 



more like Gordon Schumway, 
coughed up another furball, this 
time at his own 10 yard line. 
Art Gregory would take the 
honors from there to conclude 
an incredible stretch in which 
the Eagles scored 27 points in 
the first eight minutes and 37 
seconds of the third quarter. 

Both teams cleared the benches 
in the fourth, and it led to some 
impressive performances by the 
Eagles. Fullback Chad 



BlooitLsburg 
Clarion 



12 6 « 18 
J3 27 - 40 




Ray Henderson/ Clarion Call *)PVl^''*'« 
Coming together: Craig Ray (11) and the Golden Eagles displayed the championship form of 1992 against BU on Saturday. ij**'!'"^^^ 

Total Yards 
Art Gregory fumble stalled a on another third down attempt. rout was on. Speakman gained 32 yards on •jnmovers 

lengthy Clarion drive. Just before the half, Ray Chris Coleman recovered the five carries and Gary Fallings 3ra Down conv. 

Bloomsburg quarterback Phil marched his troops down the fumble, and three Henry runs and Dan Veney each contributed 

Ries found Buck Eardley flying field one more time. Damien later, the score was 33-12. It was three tackles in limited playing 

down the right sidehne for a 72 Henry picked up 29 of his 105 Henry's third touchdov^m and he time. 

yard touchdown and a 6-0 lead. first half yards on this drive, the would finish the day with 125 Bloomsburg scored again with 

An interception gave the last yard good for a 13-12 yards rushing. 23 seconds remaining on a Rob 

Huskies the ball at the Clarion Eagles' half time lead. Bloomsburg would shoot Giba touchdown pass to Glen 

18, and on the second play of the The Eagles came out flying in themselves in the fcwt one more McNamee from four yards away 

drive, Mike Johnson scored to the third quarter. An Alim time as Ries, looking all the to set the final at 40-18. 



First Onarter 
Bloomsburg: Eardley 72 pass from 
Ries (pasi; failed). Drive 1 play, 72 
yards, : 10. Key play; Zarzaca 
fecoversCjregary fumble. 
BJoonLshui^ 6, Clarion 0. 
Bloomsburg: Jc^nson 18 riw (pass 
failed). Drive; 2 plays, 18 yards, 
:43. Key play: BabuJa intercepts 
Ray and returns 37 yards. 
Bloomsburg 12, Clarion 0. 
Second Quarter 
Clarion: Wortby 8 pass fmm Ray 
(Cramer kick). Mve: 6 piays, 31 
yards, 2;25. Key play; Harper 15 
pass from Ray on 3rd & 9 from 
Bloom 30. Bloom 12, Clarion 7. 
Clarion: Heniy I run (pass failed). 
Drive; 13 plays, 57 yards, 3.09. Key 
play; Harper 13 pass from Ray on 
3rd & 10 fn>m Bloom 31. Clarion 
13,BUU. 

Third Quarter 
Clarion: Harper 26 pass from Ray 
(Crdmer kick). Drive: 3 plays, 28 
yards, 1 -.iy). Key play; Kamara 
intercepts Ries at BU 28. Clarion 
20,Bt(K)m 12. 

Clarion: Henry 8 run (kick failed). 
Drive: 5 plays, 53 yards, 1:54. Key 
play; Brown 23 pass from Ray on 
3rd & 8 from BU 31 . Clarion 26, 
Bloom 12. 

Clarion: Henry 2 run <Cramer kick)* 
thrive 4 plays, 15 yards, 1-34. Key 
play; Coleman recovers Ries 
fumble. ClariiHi 33, Bloom 12. 
Clarion: Gregory 10 run (Cramer 
kick) Drive 2 plys. 10 yards, :31 
Key play: Lehmann recovers Ries 
fumble at BU 10. Clarion 40, 
Bloomsburg 12- 

Fourth Quart er 
Bloomsburg: Giba 4 pass from 
McNamee (pass failed). Drive; 7 
plays, 35 yard^, 1 :06. Clarion 40, 
Bloomsburg 18. 

Team Statistics 

Bloom CUP 

11 17 

52 254 

177 120 

229 374 

5 3 

1-11 8-16 



Clarion FJaver Statistics 
tliishjng: Henry 24-125, Gregory 
21-89, Speakman 5-32. 
Passing; Ray 10 of 12 for 120 yards, 
2 TD's and one INT. 
Receiving: Harper 4-63. Bn)WTi 3- 
36. Worthy 2-16. 



Page 20 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



T 



' ' 1 II. 



% ', 



The Clarion Call: thursaaV, Octobei-U, 1^93 



Page 21 '8 



Clarion wins fifth of year: 



Sports Commentary: 



Eagles split with Point Park, Slippery Rock Lloyd and Greene are bringing back memories 



hy Nathan Kahl 
Sportswriter 



After starting off 2-1, the 
Golden Eagle volleyball team 
suffered through weeks and 
weeks of losses, however, going 
into their match against Point 
Park College, the Hagles had 
won two of tlieir last three. 

Point Park proved to be no 
match for tlie Golden Hagles and 
Clarion prevailed three games to 
one. Clarion won the match 15- 
10, 9-15, 15-2, 15-8. Jenny 
Betters led ilie Eagles with nine 
kills, and Katie Rhodes was 
close behind with seven. 
Meghan Kelly led the way 
defensively with 10 digs, while 
Lisa Flynn and Gerri Condo 
added nine. Rhoads also 
finished with 29 set assists. 

The Eagle's bliss ended, 
however, when they lost to 
Slippery Rcx:k on Tuesday. The 
Eagles dropped this one in 
straight sets, 14-16, 7-15, 11-15. 
The games were close, but this 
was the type of match where 
things could have gone either 
way, but they didn't go right for 
the Eagles. 

Flynn had nine kills and seven 
digs. Betters added seven kills. 
Rhoads was again the set assists 
leader with 28. 

The Eagles will be in action 
again on October 19 with a home 
match against Edinboro. Clarion 
lost a close, hard fought match to 
the Fighting Scots earlier this 
year. 

Clarion's overall record is 5-17 
with only four of those 22 
matches being at home. 



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Get it out of here! : Clarion's Bobble Simpson and Nicole Flambard kept lUP off balance all night. The Eagles have won 
three of their last five Including a four set thriller against Point Park last week. 



PSACs start today 



Golfers win at Edinboro 




by Nathan Kahl 
Sportswriter 



In a field of six squads at the 
Edinboro Invitational, the 
Clarion University Golden 
Eagles placed first overall with 
an score of 315. The tournament 
which was held September 30, 
was the first Clarion tournament 
victory in four years. Chris 



Brosius and Cory Bierly tore up 
the course by shooting scores of 
78. Brian Fiscus shot a 79, while 
Andy Ganoe and Todd Corbeil 
fired 80's. 

On October 5th, Clarion took 
part in the Guy W. Kuhn Classic 
better known as the Allegheny 
Invitational. The Golden Eagle 
gold team shot a 330 and 



finished eighth while the blue 
squad finished eleventh by 
shooting a 337. 

The top golfers for the Eagles 
were Greg Greksa and Rob 
Pierson who finished with scores 
of 79. Andy Ganoe continued 
his outstanding play by shooting 
an 83, and Chris Brosius and 
Chris Williams were close 



behind with an 84. Todd Corbeil 
and Brian Fiscus finished with 
scores of 85, Cory Bierly blasted 
an 86, Ron Malincheck took an 
88 and Cory Allen shot a 90. 

The Eagles begin the PSAC 
Championships today and will 
be in action October 19 and 20 
at the Davis & Elkins 
Invitational. 



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by Jody Males 
Sportswriter 



After Greg Lloyd blasted San 
Diego wide receiver Anthony 
Miller last Sunday, Miller arose 
from the turf and slowly 
stumbled to the wrong huddle. 
This play signified the kind of 
football the Pittsburgh Steelers 
are playing. 

After a dismal 0-2 start, head 
coach Bill Cowher has his black 
and gold playing the best defense 
in the league. Not the division 
or the conference, the league. 
The top-ranked defense of the 
Steelers is playing "NFC-style" 
and it's no wonder why 
Pittsburgh has won three straight 
games. 

Kevin Greene, who gave San 



Diego quarterback John Friesz a 
concussion with a bone-crushing 
hit, and Greg Lloyd whose 
blindside mugging of back-up 
Stan Humphries caused a fumble 
and a Levon Kirkland 
touchdown, have destroyed 
opposing quarterbacks all year 
They did let the ambulance 
carrying Friesz escape the field 
without stripping it, however. 
There is a limit isn't there? 

At this pace, Lloyd and Greene 
will be reclining on the beach in 
Hawaii come February. Just as 
Joe Greene was the cornerstone 
to the dynasty defense, Lloyd is 
to the 1993 version. And how 
about the secondary? Led by 
"Mr. Do Everything" Rod 
Woodson, this unit is the best in 
the league, and with tons of 



young talent, the defensive unit 
is going to be solid for years to 
come. 

Ihc Steelers last three games 
have literally been shutouts. The 
Curtain has allowed one 
offensive touchdown in the last 
three contests. Granted these 
three teams stink (2-13 
combined record), but 
remember, they are professional 
teams. 

Cowher wants his team to have 
that "nasty" image; the image of 
a punishing defense. They want 
the reputation of sporting the 
fastest, hardest-hitting defense in 
the league. Football fans, they 
have my vote! 

This week is the biggest test to 
date for Cowher's Men of Steel. 
A typical NFC powerhouse is 



coming to town. The unbeaten 
New Orleans Saints arrive, and 
with them, a well-balanced 
powerful defense and the lop 
rushing offense in the NFL. The 
Saints seem to be the "cTeam of 
the crop" for the '93 NFL 
campaign. If the Steelers can 
knock off the Saints, people 
everywhere will become 
believers. That could be just 
what the Steelers need, a solid 
winning performance over an 
NFC powerhouse and a stay at 
the top of the heap in the AFC 
Central.. 

- In other NFL notes, Miami 
Dolphins starting quarterback 
Dan Marino was lost for the 
season after he ruptured his right 
Achillies tendon against 
Cleveland last Sunday. Marino 



wasn't the only Dolphin to go 
down, however Linebacker John 
Offerdahl will miss three to four 
weeks with a dislocated right 
shoulder, and defensive end 
David Griggs will miss about a 
month after undergoing 
arthroscopic knee surgery. 

- New York Jets running back 
Blair Thomas will miss two to 
four weeks with a strained right 
hamstring, and wide receiver 
Rob Moore will miss about a 
month due to a torn cartilage in 
his right knee. 

- Chicago Bears wide receiver 
Wendell Davis may be lost for 
the year after he underwent knee 
surgery on Monday. Davis tore 
tendons in both patellas, which 
hold the knees in place, trying to 
catch a deep pass against Philly. 




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Page 22 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



Clarion vs. Lock Haven 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



Eagles look for first conference win on Saturday 



hy Tondelaya Carey 
Sportswriter 



Clarion University's football 
team travels to Lock Haven to 
battle the Bald Eagles Saturday, 
October 16th after a 40-18 
victory over Bloomsburg during 
Homecoming. Kickoff time is 
set for 1:30 at LHU's Hubert 
Jack Stadium. 

Clarion, under the tutelage of 
eleventh year head coach Gene 
Sobolewski, enters the game 
with a 2-3 overall record and an 
0-1 mark in the PSAC-Wesl. 
LcKk Haven, led by fourth year 
head coach Dennis Therrell, 
enters the game with a record of 
1-5 and an 0-2 mark in the 
conference. 

"We're basically in the same 



position going into this game as 
we were a year ago," says 
Sobolewski. "But if we're going 
to work our way back into the 
race, we have to take it one game 
at a Ume." 

Clarion's offense exploded for 
40 points last week and is 
currently averaging 338.6 yards 
of total offense with 151.2 
coming on the ground and 187.4 
through the air. The Eagles' 
defense ranks sixth in the PSAC 
and fourth in the west in total 
defense, limiting opponents to 
334.6 yards per game. 
Opponents are getting 163.8 on 
the ground and 170.5 through the 
au-. 

Clarion's defense will 
definitely have its hands full 
trying to stop the Bald Eagles' 



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the number one passing attack in 
the entire PSAC. The Bald 



Eagles are averaging 276.7 
passing yards per game, and, 
along with 96.7 rushing yards, 




Ray Henderson/Clarion Call 
Ready for action: Freshman quarterback Chris Weibel (10) 
has assumed the second-string job after Chris Zak's Injury 
ended his season prematurely. 



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average 373.3 per game. 

Quarterback Craig Ray will 
lead Clarion's offense again. 
Ray, a transfer from New Haven, 
completed 10 of 12 passes for 
120 yards and two touchdowns 
against Bloomsburg. He has 
now completed 30 of 58 aerials 
for 330 yards and three scores in 
1993. Starting Eagles' 
quarterback Chris Zak will miss 
the remainder of the year due to 
a re-injured knee. 

Ail-American tight end Tim 
Brown has caught 30 passes for 
332 yards and needs four 
receptions to set the new Clarion 
career record with 150 grabs. 
Also ready to catch passes are 
wideouts Kevin Harper with 10 
catches for 155 yards and 
Marlon Worthy who has eight 
receptions for 140 yards. 

Senior tailback Damien Henry 
ranks third in the PSAC-West 
with 521 yards and four 
touchdowns on 114 carries. 
Henry is Clarion's fourth all- 
time leading rusher with 1,615 
yards and is tied for third in 
career touchdowns with 22. 
Gregory, meanwhile, has run for 
222 yards and two scores on 62 
attempts. 

Lock Haven quarterback Bob 
McLaughlin has completed 147 
of 259 passes for 1,624 yards 
and nine touchdowns. He leads 
the PSAC in total offense 
averaging 273.2 yards per game. 
Top receivers are Jon Spinosa, 
Bryan McGinty, Erik 

Steinbacher, and Otis Duncan. 
Spinosa has caught 33 balls for 
380 yards and three scores; 
McGinty has 31 catches for 311 
yards; Steinbacher has 26 
receptions for 318 yards, and 
Otis Duncan has latched on to 
1 1 McLaughlin strikes. 

Lock Haven is led on the 
ground by Afiba Fairnot, who 
has gained 298 yards on 68 
carries. Kevin Brown has gained 
155 yards on 36 attempts. 

The Bald Eagles problems 
have come on defense where 
Lock Haven ranks last in the 
PSAC in total defense giving up 
509.2 yards per game. 
Opponents are getting 274.7 
rushing yards and 234.5 passing 
yards per game, plus 36.5 points 
per outing. 

The Golden Eagles host 
Shippensburg next Saturday, 
October 23rd at 1 pm. Clarion 
beat Lock Haven 42-14. 
CJregory ran for 148 yards and 
Jay lonini gained 166 during last 
year's Homecoming. 



Page23 



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Needed: 1 or 2 female roommates 
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semester. For info, call: 226-5647. 
Females preferred. 

ROOM FOR RENT: Need 2 female 
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Personals 



Sig Eps, Thanks for the fun-filled 
mixer, we'll have to try it again. 
Love, the sisters of Alpha Sigma 
Alpha 



Happy 21st birthday to Kris Milner. 
Love, the sisters of Alpha Sigma 
Alpha. . , -_ 



A special thank you to Joe and 
Linda Ida for all your help and 
contributions in making our float a 
success. Love, the sisters of Alpha 
Sigma Alpha. 



Congratulations to our new associate 
members: Amy Banner, Carolyn 
Boarts, Vicki Brown, Julia 
Dornenburg, Kelly Holtsman, Lisa 
Massie, Jennifer Nock and Tonya 
Piper It may seem to be a long road 
ahead but it's well worth the trip. 
Love, your sisters of Alpha Sigma 
Alpha. 



A special thanks to the Dance Team 
for dancing the night away with 
us.. .we're still breathing heavy! - 
The D.C. boys 



Our brothers wish to congratulate 
Amy Martz on becoming the new 
sweetheart of Sigma Chi. We love 
you Amy & look forward to a 
wonderful year. 



Heidi Servette- "Don't let weeds 
grow around your dreams. " Keep up 
the good work! I love you litUe! - 
Jen 



Dawn and Larina- Thank you for all 
your hard work on the float. Love, 
your D Phi E sisters. 



Sig Eps- Thanks for a great ALF 
mixer and for helping out with the 
float. We had fun working with you 
guys! Love, the sisters of Delta 
Zeta! 



Sig Tau Gamma- Thanks for the 
mixer and for all your work on the 
float. We love you guys. Let's get 
together again soon. Love, D Phi E. 



Alpha Chi Rho- thanks for the great 
hippie mixer. We'll groove with you 
anytime. Love, the sisters of Alpha 
Sigma Alpha. 



Merrilynn- congratulations on your 
engagement and being crowned 
Homecoming Queen. We're so 
happy for you. You're a queen in all 
our hearts. We love you. Your 
sisters of Alpha Sigma Tau. 



Amy- congratulations on your 
lavaliring and being named Sigma 
Chi SweeUieart. We're so proud of 
you. With love, your sisters of 
Alpha Sigma Tau. 



Hey Phi Sigma Kappa! The pig 
roast was a blast, but being your 
sweetheart is the best! Thank you 
for bringing it back and making me 
the first in a long time. I love you 
guys! Let's make this year the best 
ever. Love, Josie. 



Colleen and Treaster- thanx for the 
great job with Alumna tea. Love, 
yourZTA sisters. 



Sigma Chi- Thanx for the great 
week, the mixer and our float- we 
all had a blast! And a special thanx 
to Maria (Stressmiester) and Denny 
(Craftmaster) for your hard work 
getting the float together! Love, the 
Zetas 



Thanks to Sigma Sigma Sigma for 
the great job Oct. 7, distributing 
First Federal balloons during ALF - 
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Hey KDR- High-5 right back at you! 
Great job on a #1 float! We love you 
guys! love, ITieta Phi Alpha. 

Wendy and Karin- you guy.s did a 
great job with the lloal! Love, your 
sisters of Theta Phi Alpha. 



Theta Chi- Getting together for ALF 
was great. Can't wait to mix again. 
We'll bond anytime!! Love. Tri 
Sigma 



Congrats to Carolyn and Pam K. for 
a successful float and alumni 
gathering. Special thanks to all 
Sigma Sigma Sigma sisters who 
helped with organizing ALF 
weekend. 



Tri-Sigma wants to know if you're 
brave enough to visit the Sigma 
Sigma Sigma haunted house. Come 
visit us at the open bid party 
Monday, October 18 from 8:30-9:30 
p.m. -if you dare 



Theta Xi- Thanks for helping us 
with the float and the great mixer on 
Thursday. We had a blast! Love, Phi 
Sigma Sigma. 



Stephanie- Thanks so much for all 
your hard work on our float. You 
did a wonderful job! We love you! 
Your Phi Sig sisters. 



Phi Sigma Sigma congratulates 
CUP'S new Homecoming Queen, 
Merrilyn Murnyack. 



Slack- Thanks for all the hard work 
you did to make our float such a 
success. You did a great job. We 
love our Turtlebuddy. Love, the 
sisters of Delta Zeta. 



Kelly and Sara- Thanks for the 
excellent chartering banquet -Love, 
your D Phi E sisters. 



Christine A- Happy 21st Birthday 
next week. Hope it's a blast! Love, 
your Delta Zeta sisters. 

Amy Mennen- Thank you for 
putting so much hard work and 
effort into the float. You made the 
land of "Oz" come to life. Love, 
your Delta Zeta sisters. 



Delta Zeta would like to extend a 
special Congratulations to Merrilyn 
Murnyak on becoming the 1993 
Homecoming Queen. 



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Happy Birthday Jen Sniezek! Your 
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Announcements 



ATTENTION COFFEE 

DRINKERS!! Feel like starting a 
coffee club, sitting around talking 
the issues and drinking the Java? 
Completely informal, (^all Jeff at 
2912 or Ray at 2380. 



"To be your voice, we must hear 
your voice."- 1993 Student Senate. 



Sunday Student Mass, 5:30 p.m. at 
Immaculate Conception Church. 
Main Street. This week: NO MASS 
10/17, Enjoy mid-semester break! 
Next Week: Rite of Acceptance for 
students preparing to join the next 
Easter Gospel: Matthew 22:34-40 



Student Senate meetings are held 
Monday evenings at 7:30 p.m. in 
246 Gemmell. All are welcome to 
attend. 



"Now that I'm here, how should I be 
planning my career?" Presented by: 
Representative from Career Services 
and sponsored by the Newman 
Association. WHEN: Oct. 19th at 
7:00 p.m. WHERE: 248 Gemmell. 
ALL WELCOME! 

Clarion vs. lUP Bloodmobile 
Challenge Monday, October 18th, 11 
a.m. -5 p.m. Gemmell M-P room. 
Don't forget to donate. You may even 
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finding the correct supplies for your 
typewriter - call CLARION OFRCF 
EQUIPMENT, Rt 66 South, 226-8740 

For Sale: 1993 Trek Mountain Bike 
great condition, like new. Accessories 
included. $4(X). Call Jim. 226-9345 

Wc have carpet and vinyl remnants. 
Hinies L&R Store 

For sale: Sporty '89 Chevy Bercttu Ci'l. 
blue. V6. Fl. sunroof, al.irin wiih 
outdoor locks, power window ^/Idc'ks, 
AC. spotless interior, hluc b(H)k \aluL" 
57.200. Will sell $6,:'.(i Call DrrvK. 
226-3005. 



Page 24 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 14, 1993 



The Godfather predicts: 

The road to Pasadena goes through Happy Valley 



Just to bring you up to dale, the 
Godfather went 3-1 last week. 
What does that tell you? It tells 
you that the Godfather just wins. 
It also tells you that if you don't 
listen tt) the Godfather, you may 
find a stallion head when you 
wake up. 'I"his week I'm taking 
a kx)k at the biggest games in the 
biggest conferences. So call your 
bookie; make him an offer he 



can't refuse. 

#17 Michigan at #7 Penn State -5 
This game is crucial to both 
teams on their quest for the Rose 
Bowl. Penn State is undefeated 
in its inaugural Big Ten season, 
while Michigan suffered iLs first 
loss in 29 Big Ten games last 
week. Penn State quarterback 
Kerry Collins is sU"ong and will 



be looking to get the ball into the 
hands of explosive wide receiver 
Bobby Ingram. The Wolverines 
will try to pound Tyrone 
Whealley down the throats of the 
Lions. No chance. Take Penn 
State in Happy Valley as the 
Lions lake a step closer to 
Pasadena. Penn St. 20, 
Michigan 7. 





226-8881 



Sun-Wed 11 AM-Midnight 
Thurs11AM-1AM 
FrI-Sat 1 1 AM-2AM 



327 W. MAIN ST. CLARION, PA 



Monday Night 
Football Special 

16" One topping Pizza 



Only $6.00 



plus tax 



Good only on Mondays 
5:00 pm - Midnight 



October Special 

2 -16" Cheese 

Pizza 
Only $11.99 piusax 

$1.80/ topping covers both pizzas 

Expires 10-31-93 



PIZZA 



Dinner 
for four 

Only $8.25 

PLUS TAX 

Includes 16" one-item pizza 
plus 4 cups of Pepsi 

limited delivery area only Expires 10/31/93 
226-8881 






Dinner 
for two 



Only $6,00 

PLUS TAX 

Includes 12" one-item pizza 
plus 2 cups of Pepsi 

limited delivery area only Expires 1(y31/93 
226-8881 



PIZZA' 



Sub ' 
for two 



Only $4.50 

PLUS TAX 

Includes BIG 12" SUB plus 
2 cups of Pepsi 

limited del very area only Expires 1 CVS 1/93 
226-881 



#10 Tennessee at #2 Alabama -6 

The Tide finally gets its first 
major test when the Tennessee 
Volunteers come to town. 
'Bama owns the nation's longest 
winning streak as well as the 
quickest, hardest-hitting defense. 
Tennessee boasts of quarterback 
Heath Shuler who passed for 307 
yards last week against Arkansas 
despite wearing uniform number 
21. Alabama is not Arkansas. 
Look for the Tide to roll closer 
to the Sugar Bowl. Alabama 24, 
Tennessee 17. 

#20 Colorado at #9 Oklahoma -6 

Who would have thought that 
the Sooners would be sitting at 
5-0. But here they are, and a 
confrontation with Nebraska for 
an Orange Bowl berth could be 
happening "soon." Cale Gundy 
and company have schooned 
over their opponents thus far 
including Texas A&M. 
Colorado has had a rough time 
of it lately. Even Big 8 doormat 
Missouri covered the spread last 
week against the Buffaloes. 
Figure the Sooners to jump on 
the Buffs early and often. 
Oklahoma 30, Colorado 17. 

Stanford at #11 Arizona -11 

Bill Walsh, who some say has 
the greatest mind in football, 
better come up with an ingenius 
formula to figure out how to gain 
a yard against Arizona's Desert 



Swarm defense. After this week, 
I have a feeling Bill will 
contemplate going back to the 
booth for Notre Dame games. 
The Wildcats are on their way to 
the Rose Bowl and anyone who 
dares stand in their way, will 
suffer the same treatment as 
someone who keeps me from my 
lasagna. Arizona 28, Stanford 3. 

Clarion -5 at Lock Haven 

The Eagles are at the point in 
their schedule where they should 
be able to put together some 
wins. Quarterback Craig Ray 
played an exceptional second 
half on Saturday, and his passing 
should open up the running game 
for Damien Henry and Art 
Gregory. The defense struggled 
early against Bloomsburg, but 
after two quick scores, the 
Huskies were shut down the rest 
of the way. Look for Clarion to 
start showing the championship 
form of 1992. Clarion 33, Lock 
Haven 18. 

The big plate of spaghetti 

award goes to Georgia Bulldog 
quarterback Eric Zeier. Zeier set 
an SEC record as he threw for 
544 yards and four touchdowns 
against Southern Mississippi. 

The Black Rose award goes to 
the Michigan Wolverines for 
spoiling a perfect week for the 
Godfather. I'll get my revenge. 



Wass 




m[[ Be processed 



Stehle's 

Mini-storage 

3 miles from CUP - Intersection 322 & 66 
Shippenville, PA 16254 

5'x7'space - $26.50 per month 
5'xlp' space - $31.80 per month 

Deposit required - Larger spaces available 

Access 7 days a week 

NEWLY INSTALLED SECURITY GATE 

Phone (814) 226-9122 



r srm'mmvf! am'JI''t,:si3sa.: 





^^^^^■■1 *--^*^&im>im '^■<*lniW^ vM»St^M)m iMItttti^ 



Volume 74, Issue 7 



In 
This 
Issue 



News 

Registration Time 

Gcmmell computers to bel 
improved for pnx:ess. . . pg. 5 1 



Lifestyles 

Drug and alcohol 
prevention 

iCommunity gets involved in I 
ped ribbon program pg. 9 



Sports 



Sports Spotl^ht 

Hie Brown 'catches' Urbanskyl 

pg. 18 



Weather Outlook 



tlitirsday: 

Friday: 

Saturday: 

Sunday: 

Monday: 

Tuesday: 

Wednesday: 



Cloudy 
high 55 
Partly sunny 
high 57 
Chance of rain 
high 55 
Partly cloudy 
high 52 
Sunny 
high 59 
Mostly sunny 
high 6() 
Chance of rain 
high 58 



Commeniaiy pg 2 

^^s pg.'s 

Lifestyles ■ • • Pg. 9 

Entertainment pg 12 i 

TV Guide pg J4 j 

Sports pg. 15 

Classifieds pg, 19 j 



The student newspaper of Clarion University of Pennsyl 




vania October 21, 1993 



Clarion wins blood drive challenge 



by Michelle Sparer 
Editor 

Clarion University was 
victorious Monday, besting 
Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania at the blood drive 
challenge, by surpassing their 
quota and netting 229 pints of 
blood for the American Red 
Cross. 

Clarion's goal was to surpass 
175 pints within one day unlike 
lUP who fell short a few weeks 
ago, of their preset two day 
quota of 600 pints of b lood. 

"Student Senate is 

very proud of both 

Clarion and lUP 

for the tremendous 

participation with 

the blood mobile 

challenge. " 

—Gara Smith 



The blood drive challenge was 
sponsored by the respective 
student goveraements at the rival 
schools in conjunction with the 
American Red Cross in an effort 
to boost extremely low blood 
supplies in the region. 

"Student Senate is very proud 
of both Clarion and lUP for the 
tremendous participation with 







the blood mobile challenge," 
said Clarion's Student Senate 
President, Gara Smith. "[It's] an 
even better feeling in knowing 



that lives will be saved." 

Because of the win. Clarion's 
flag will fly over lUP's campus 
on November 12 and a cake will 



be presented by lUP's president 
to Clarion's alumni at the 
November 13 Clarion versus 
lUP football game. 



^ - -o -,w«uv. ,^ uiiu a taKc wui lUP lootball game 

Anti-Abortion groups target college papers 



by Diana Smith 
College Press Service 



Pro-life groups are targeting 
colleges with paid newspaper 
supplements that use first person 
accounts and photographs of 
babies and developing fetuses to 
urge women to consider 
altemaatives to abortion. 

"We had hoped to put it in 100 
campuses nationwide this year," 
said Bob Cheatham, a graduate 
student at the University of 
Southern California and past 
president of the California 
Collegians for Life. Students 



who oppose abortion want to 
print and distribute 1 million 
copies of the publication through 
campus newspapers. 

However, the supplemental has 
raised objections from some 
students who believe it is an 
attempt to bypass the editorial 
process and get pro-life views 
into circulation without 
dissenting opinions. Pro-choice 
students also have criticized 
some information in the 
publication as false or 
misleading and question whether 
First Amendment issues are 
involved. 



Students involved in getting 
the supplement into as many 
college newspapers as possible 
believe the pro-choice groups are 



disgruntled because Collegians 
for Life have found an effective 
communication tool. 



Legal Ed. Seminar 



The Clarion University Center 
for Legal Education has been 
approved to host a one day 
seminar, "Current Development 
in Legal Ethics," which will 
meet the Pa Supreme court's 
requirementof continuing 
education. 

"The Pennsylvania Supreme 
Court promogated a rule that all 



Iwayers authorized to practice in 
Pennsylvania mu.^>t complete 
instruction each year in legal 
ethics." 

This seminar will meet the 
requirements set down by the 
court. Six speakers from various 
law firms are scheduled to speak 
to 900 invited attorneys at the 
seminar on Nov. 23. 




Page 2 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 21, 1993 



Opinion 



The Clarion 
Call 



Eagles Staff 



Michelle Sporer 

Editor-in-Chief 

Alan Vaughn 

Managing Editor 

Rodney Sherman 

News Editor 

Amy Gerkin 

Features Editor 

Ben Vessa 

Sports Editor 

Ray Henderson 

Photography Editor 

Samantha White 

Ad Design 

Chris Clouse 

Advertising Manager 

Brigitte Josefczyk 

Circulation Editor 

& Interim 

Business Manager 

Hans Dovenspike 

Copy/Design Editor 

Art Barlow 

Advisor 

The Clarion Call is published 
every Thursday during the school 
year in accordance with the 
school calendar. Editors accept 
contributions from any source, 
but reserve the right to edit all 
copy for libel, taste, style and 
length. 

The absolute deadline for 
editorial copy is 12:00 p.m. on 
Monday. 

Opinions expressed in the 
editorials are those of the writers 
and not necessarily the opinion of 
the university or of the student 
body. 

Display advertising copy is due 
Wednesday by 5:00 p.m. 1 week 
prior to publication. Classifieds 
are due Tuesday at noon the 
week of publication. 

The Clarion Call is funded by 
me Student Activity Fee and 
advertisinp revenue. 

270 Gemmell 

Clarion University of 

Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

(814) 226- 2380 

Advertising Rates 

Display Ads: Per Column 

Inch...$5.50 

Classified Ads...$1.00 for 

every 10 words every five 

words after are $^0 

Subscriptions 

Semester...$7.00 

Academic Year...$10.00 

The Clarion 

CaU'is 

printed on 

recycled 

newsprint 



w 




The way I see it 



/ ^ J Photo 



hotography F^ditor 



In celebration of the October 
Classic: The World Series, I 
again proffer a reprint of the 
testimony of one Casey Stengel, 
Manager of the New York 
Yankees, said testimony given 
on 9 July, 1958, before the 
subcommittee on Antitrust and 
Monopoly of the Committee of 
the Judiciary ofthe Unites States 
Senate. This excerpt is taken 
from The Congressional Record. 

I try to reprint this testimony 
every four years; that way each 
generation of college students 
will have had at least one 
exposure to "Stengelese." Casey, 
the master of manipulation and 
the manipulator of obfuscation, 
has always been a known force 
with which to deal, but in 
reviewing this copy I made a 
new discovery (redundant) - the 
quick wit, keen mind and 
brilliant use of linguistic 
simplicity of, (lest we forgot that 
only one representative of the 
baseball establishment was 
giving testimony), Mickey 
Mantle. I always knew there was 
something lurking behind that 
boyish grin. Enjoy. . . 
From The Congressinal Record 

Casey Stengel 
Senator Kefauver: Mr. Stengel, 
you are the manager of the New 
York Yankees. Will you give us 
very briefly your background 
and your views about this 
legislation? 

Mr. Stengel: Well, I started in 
professional ball in 1910. I have 
been in professional ball, I 
would say, for 48 years. I have 
been employed by numerous ball 
:lubs in the majors and in the 
minor leagues. 

I started in the minor leagues 
with Kansas City. I played as 
low as Class D ball, which was 
at Shelbyville, Kentucky, and 
also Class C ball and Class A 
ball, and I have advanced in 
baseball as ballplayer. 

I had many years that I was not 
so successful as a ballplayer, as 
it is a game of skill. And then I 
was no doubt discharged by 
baseball in which I had to go 
back to the minor leagues as a 
manager, and after being in the 



A. Barlow 

minor leagues as a manager, I 
became a major league manager 
in several cities and was 
discharged, we call it discharged 
because there was no question, I 
had to leave. 

And I returned to the minor 
leagues at Milwaukee, Kansas 
City and Oakland, California, 
and then returned to the major 
leagues. In the last 10 years, 
naturally, in major-league 
baseball with the New York 
Yankees; the New York Yankees 
have had u^emendous success, 
and while I am not a ballplayer 
who does the work, I have no 
doubt worked for a ball club that 
is very capable in the office. 

(Continued on pg. 4) 



Last night as I was defrosting 
my freezer, 1 realized two 
l+hings. F'irst, 1 should defrost 
my freezer more often, and 
second, winter is about to return 
to Clarion. 

For the benefit of all you 
freshmen and transfer students 
who haven't yet experienced 
winter here at Clarion University 
of Pennsylvania's Siberia 
campus, we are mind-numbingly 
proud to extend to you the 
Official 1993 Clarion Call 
Spectacular Blow-Out All- 
American Winter Preview and 
Survival Guide. 

{WARNING: THE FOLLOW- 
ING PARAGRAPHS OF THIS 
COLUMN CONTAIN SCENES 
OF A FRANK AND GRAPHIC 
NATURE. NO ONE WILL BE 
ADMITTED WITHOUT SNOW 
SHOES, SEVEN LAYERS OF 
THERMAL UNDERWEAR, 
AND A VALID STUDENT 
I.D) 

The first thing you should 
know about the Clarion winter is 
when to expect it. Usually, 
winter arrives in Clarion 
sometime between late October 
and early May, much like the Pro 
Basketball season. 

Also like the Pro Basketball 
season, winter here in Clarion is 
boring, unproductive, and seems 
like it will never ever end. 

Another important thing about 



winter in Clarion: one moment 
it's a really nice day out, and one 
moment later WHOOMP (sound 
of four feet of snow falling 
without warning), four feet of 
snow has fallen without warning. 
This can be very disturbing, 
particularly for those of you who 
are less than four feet tall. 

As far as surviving these 
months of hell, here are a few 
tips and tricks to help you get by: 

l.)Use cafeteria trays as sleds 
on the hill by Ralston. Don't 
worry if you can't get stopped. 
You will crash headfirst into the 
Student Center long before you 
get to the street. 

2.)Get together in the TV 
lounge with your friends, turn 
off the TV, look out the window, 
and make fun of all the people 
who slip and fall on the ice (I 
once saw a person clear an entire 
set of stairs by Catlson Library). 

3,,)Write your name in the 
snow (you can get really creative 
here). 

4.)If you're out of hairspray, 
just style your hair, leave it wet, 
and then go outside. In ten 
seconds it will be stiff as a 
board. 

5.)Walk down the hill by 
Peirce, fall down by Tippin, and 
slide on your butt the whole way 
to Becker. 

Have a pleasant winter, or 
maybe stay in Clarion instead. 




The Clarion Call: Thursday, October 21, 1993 



Page 3 



D *i''OateO t>y Tr Dui^e MtO«J ?.«fvtCM 



"in WR PEOPLE GO/ 



Reader Responses 



Athletes 
are heroes 



Dear Editor: 

I thought that the commentary 
written by Nathan Kahl was 
interesting ("My interview with 
Jack Lambert"). In fact, 1 wrote a 
similar piece on athletes last year 
in the Venango Voice. I went on 
to say that Lou Gehrig was my 
favorite athlete of all time 
because of his dedicadon (2,130 
consecutive games), his lifetime 
statistics, his compassion for 
people, and his truly moving 
final speech at Yankee Stadium; 
"I consider myself the luckiest 
man on the face of the earth." 
People like that are few and far 
between. 

But what about our 
expectations of athletes? Is it too 
demanding? My belief is that to 
some extent, aUiletes should be 
role models. Afterall, it is the 



fans who are really paying their 
salaries. I've sometimes 
wondered why millions of 
people are such devoted fans of 
I rofessional sporus teams. Is it to 
jee the greatest talent in the 
world or is it to see the people 
who have the greatest talent in 
the world. I've always figured it 
was the latter. I think they owe 
us a little more than just doing 
their job. This doesn't mean that 
we should bug them for an 
autograph if they are eating at a 
restaurant. Nor are they expected 
to be "chipper" every time they 
make a public appearance. 

However, I think they should 
conduct themselves as a role 
model to fans, (i.e., staying away 
from drugs, getting in bar fights, 
etc.) particularly to children. 

Athletes are heroes. That is 
their job. 

John Grenci is a math 
instructor at Venango Campus 




eat Steak." 



("Then, give them any regular 6 "sub* of their 
choice for just 99<f.") 




No wonder diings went bad for Marie Antoinette. 

She said, "Let them eat cakej-not "steak." Anyway, we're playing 

it sman, because for a limited time when you buy a delicious Steak & Cheese 

Sub with a medium soft drink, we'll give you any regular 6" sub* for just 99<. 

(Hey, we've got our heads on straight over here.) 



iSUB 



^hisilif lasu- 



36 South Eigth Avenue, Clarion 226-7131 

. Sub must be ti( equal or lesser value. Not good with any other offer. For a limNed time. Not lor del-very. 



Praise for 
the library 



Dear Editor: 

This letter is in regard to 
Carlson Library and its services. 
However, it is not one of the 
usual library-bashing types; 
instead it is a laudation to its 
performance. 

After two-and-a-half years as 

a grad student in Rehab Sciences 

at Clarion, I have found the 

overall resources to be more than 

praiseworthy. Above all, I have 

found the staff to be far more 

helpful and courteous than that 

of the larger libraries at Pitt and 

Penn State, whose libraries I 

used to roam for six years as an 

undergraduate. Perhaps I have 

found Carlson's resources to be 

most advantageous because I 

simply took the time to learn 

what potentials libraries can 

offer while still in high school - 

and there were no available 

GEAC. ERIC, InforTrack, and 

PsychLit computer systems back 

then! Many students still fail to 

take full advantage of these 

databases, yet will tell you the 

library had no information on the 

subject being researched. 

To be honest, I will be the first 
to admit that Carlson is not 
entirely up-to-date in certain 
areas, and does lack some 
immediate resources; most 
libraries do due to growth and 
technological change. However, 
many of these unavailable 
resources may be obtained via 
interlibrary loan if students 
would just take the time to 
examine their needs closely, ask 
questions, and place orders early. 
Notably, the reference and 
interlibraiy-loan staff deserve the 
most praise as far as I am 
concerned. Friends, you simply 
will not get as much one-on-one 
help and considerate effcwt from 
larger libraries. Perhaps you 
would enjoy paying the 
processing fees for any reprints 



Dear Clarion, 

A special and warm thanks 
are extended to you from 
Student Senate. We did not 
only meet our quota but we 
donated 229 pints of blood! 
An extra thanks to all who 
donated. The proud CUP flag 
will soar high above the 
losing lUP. Go Golden 
Eagles! 

Gara Smith, President 
Student Senate 



of journal articles obtained 
elsewhere - this is a reality at 
many larger libraries! Of course, 
there are many disadvanmges of 
having a smaller library; 
however, perhaps we should 
focus on die advantages instead. 
As the average student, I have 
usually found that if you make 
the effort to dig deeply enough, 
look at what you have instead of 
don't have, and pose questions to 
the Carlson staff, you will 
probably end up with all the 
information you can possibly use 
for any assignment. Remember... 
knowing how and where to look 
is half the battle. 

Jeffrey W. Edelmann is a 
graduate student in 
Rehabilitative Sciences at 
Clarion 



TciH 
for flexibility 

uear Editor: 

On October 6, 1993, a 
classmate and I decided to go see 
the University performance of 
"Love Letters" in Hart Chapel. 
Actually, we are both enrolled in 
Acting 254, and Dr. Mary 
Hardwick made attending the 
show mandatory for all of her 
students. So, because I am a 
good student, I decided to go. 

My friend and I were 
informed' in class that CUP 
students were admitted to 
performances and oUier activities 
free of charge. That is why we 
pay our activities fee. I 
understood that I had to take my 
student ID to verify that I am 
honesdy a CUP student. 

When I got to the door of 
Hart Chapel, approximately ten 
minutes before die performance 
began, I walked up to the lady 
sitting at die table guarding the 
front entrance like a pit bull. I 
said hello to her, and she replied 
coldly, "ID!" I handed her my 
student identification card, and 
she threw it back at me. She 
barked, "Five dollars or you 
can't get in. Your ID isn't 
validated." 

At that moment I saw my 
teacher Dr. Mary Hardwick, who 
was nervously awaiting the 
beginning of the performance 
that she had been laboring over 
for weeks. I flagged Dr. Mary 
down, and I explained my 
situation. She very graciously 
explained to the woman that I 
was in her class, and I was 
indeed a student at Clarion 



University this semester. 

The woman began to growl. 
She .said Student Senate's policy 
is Uiat no one can get into any 
activity for free unless diey have 
a validated student ID card to 
prove they have paid their 
activities fee. 

Still calm, I explained to diis 

person that I lived in a 

dormitory. I showed her my key, 

and I explained to her that every 

student in die dorms pays their 

activities fee before they are 

given dieir key. I furdier stated 

diat I am a writer for die Clarion 

Call. My friend, luckily, had a 

copy of the previous week's 

paper, and I showed the woman 

my name on the byline. I 

explained to her diat I could not 

participate in activities unless I 

had paid my activities fee. 

Dr. Mary, who was becoming 
impatient, said she would give 
me the five dollars for my 
admission. I declined, and 
informed her Uiat I would raUier 
walk back to my room to get Uie 
money, 

I walked out of Uie chapel 
doorway and headed toward my 
dorm. As I was walking, I 
became enraged at this 
unbelievable scene diat had just 
occurred. I sprinted back to Hart 
Chapel ready to defend my 
position, once again. It was five 
minutes after the performance 
had begun. 

As I entered the now dark 
chapel, where the entire audience 
was captivated by die actors on 
stage, die woman was nowhere 
to be found. I couldn't believe 
my eyes. I walked right in, 
along with two other students 
who did not show their ID to 
anyone. I enjoyed the entire 
performance free of charge. 

I can understand the rule 
requiring students to get their 
ID'S validated in Order to prove 
diey are currently CUP students. 
What I cannot understand is die 
Draconian policy they have 
adopted of enforcing dieir rule. 

Governor Jerry Brown once 
said, "What we all need is a 
flexible plan for an everchanging 
world." If the United Stales 
government recognizes this 
statement to be true, I think 
Clarion University's government 
should take a look at it too. 
Christy Williams is a 
Sophomore, English and 
Secondary/Special Education 
major 



Page 4^ 



The Clarion Call: Thursday, Octoher 21, 1993 



Hide Park 

(cont. from pg. 2) 



1 have been up and clown ihe 
ladder. I know there are some 
things ill baseball 35 to 50 years 
ago that are better now than they 
were in those days. In those 
days, my goodness, you eould 
not transfer a ball elub in the 
minor leagues, CIjlss i), Class C 
ball, (^lass A ball. 

How eould you transfer a ball 
elub when you did not have a 
highway.' How eould you 
transfer a ball elub when the 
nulroad then would take you to a 
town, you got off and then you 
had to wail and sit up five hours 
to go to another ball elub? 

How eould you run baseball 
then without night ball? 

You had to have night ball to 
improve the proeceds, to pay 
larger salaries, and I went to 
work, the first year 1 received 
$135 a month. 

I thought that was amazing. I 
had to put away enough money 
to go to dental college. I found 
out it was not better in dentistry. 
1 stayed in baseball. Any other 
question you would like to ask 
me? 

Senator Kefauver: Mr. Stengel, 
arc you prepared to answer 
particularly why baseball wants 
this bill passed? 

Mr. Stengel: Well, I would have 
to say at the present time, I think 
that baseball has advanced in this 
respect for the player help. That 
is an amazing statement for me 
to make, because you can retire 
with an annuity at 50 and what 
organization in America allows 
you to retire at 50 and receive 
money? 

1 want to further state that 1 am 
not a ballplayer, that is, put into 
that pension fund committee. At 
my age, and I have been in 
baseball, well, 1 will say 1 am 
possibly the oldest man who is 
working in baseball. 1 would say 
that when they start an annuity 
for the ballplayers to better their 
conditions, it should have been 
done, and 1 think it has been 
done. 

I think it should be the way 
they have done it, which is a 
very gcxxl thing. 

I'he reason they possibly did 
not tiike the miuiagers in at that 
lime was because radio and 



TOUIN & COUNTRV 
CLERNERS 

Formal wear 

& 

costumes 

S41 Lit>oMy filroel CAi\r»>r\ PA 1f)?14 

We have over 200 
costum^s.tor rental 
for Halloween and 
all year longi 




Hi-t Ml 'I :»;iM 
< AX ;ni /?';•, ]r,u 



television or the income to ball 
clubs was not large enough that 
you eould have put in a pension 
plan. 

Now 1 jun not a member of the 
pension plan. You have young 
men here who iu'e, who represent 
Ihe ball clubs. 

They represent the players iuid 
since I am not a member and 
don't receive pension from a 
fund which you think, my 
goodness, he ought to be 
declaied in that, tcx), but 1 would 
say that is a great thing for the 
ballplayers. 

That is one thing 1 will say for 
the ballplayers, they have an 
advanced pension fund. I should 
think it was gained by radio and 
television or you could not have 
enough money to pay anything 
of that type. 

Now the second thing about 
baseball that I think is very 
interesting to the public or to all 
of us is that it is the owner's fault 
if he does not improve his club, 
along with the officials in the 
ball club and the players. 
Now what causes that? 

If I am going to go on the road 
and we are a traveling ball club 
and you know the cost of 
transportation now -- we travel 
sometimes with three Pullman 
coaches, the New York Yankees 
and remember I am just a 
salaried man, and do not own 
stock in the New York Yankees. 
I found out that in uaveling with 
the New York Yankees on the 
road and all, that it is the best, 
and we have broken records in 
Washington this year, we have 
broken them in every city but 
New York and we have lost two 
clubs that have gone out of the 
city of New York. 

Of course, we have had some 
bad weather, I would say that 
they are mad at us in Chicago, 
we fdl the parks. 

They have come out to see 
good matericil. I will say they are 
mad at us in Kansas City, but we 
broke their attendance record. 

Now on the road we only get 
possibly 27 cents. I am not 
positive of these figures, as I am 
not an official. 

If you go back 15 years or so, 
if I owned stock in the club, I 
would give Uiem to you. 
Senator Kefauver: Mr. Stengel, I 
am not sure that I made my 
question clear. 

Mr. Stengel: Yes sir. Well, that is 
all right. I am not sure I am 
going to answer yours perfectly 
either. 

Senator O'Mahoney: How many 
minor leagues were there i